CroBorg Commuter

General Discussion about electric bicycles.

Re: Greyborg Warp Build Planning

Postby markobetti » Sun Mar 11, 2012 5:10 pm

Alan B wrote:
gensem wrote:If you a carefull you can fit like 24-28 (depending on the clearance you want front the side cover) 20ah a123 pouchs, but be aware that you ll have to bent the cells a little.


That is about 1.5 kwh of A123. Nice. :)

Is that using both battery storage areas on the frame?


you can fit 48 hewadways inside ..without bending ....still 1.5 kw
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Re: Greyborg Warp Build Planning

Postby cassschr1 » Sun Mar 11, 2012 7:46 pm

Markobetti,can the bending of the cells be avoided by using the wider side covers. Cass
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Re: Greyborg Warp Build Planning

Postby Alan B » Mon Mar 12, 2012 4:33 pm

Decided to go with White Industries 16 tooth ENO freewheel. Ordered.

Will have to deal with the thread depth.

Less costly freewheels are probably fine.

The White product is clearly the best in class.

Freewheel failures are not too common but can result in crashes.
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Re: Greyborg Warp Build Planning

Postby Alan B » Sun Apr 15, 2012 12:25 pm

Looking at brakes

The Greyborg standard forks have dual disc capability. So what dual mirrored calipers are available?

Looks like only two. The Gatorbrake 8 pot, and the Magura BIG Twins. Any others??


Freewheels Again

Received the White Industries. It will take an 8mm spacer to avoid having it bottom out on the motor threads. The motor threads are wide. Not sure if this is a problem until the swingarm is together and more measurements are made.
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Re: Greyborg Warp Build Planning

Postby zombiess » Sun Apr 15, 2012 1:29 pm

Alan B wrote:Looking at brakes

The Greyborg standard forks have dual disc capability. So what dual mirrored calipers are available?

Looks like only two. The Gatorbrake 8 pot, and the Magura BIG Twins. Any others??


Greyborg told me Hygia does duals that work. I've been wanting to order some Hygia brakes to test them out but have been holding off until I get my own frame and fork because I want the dual fronts. From what I've read the Hygia brakes look pretty nice and are reasonably priced for complete setups. If someone buys them I hope they do a review. I really want to buy a set myself right now just to test them out on my race bike which currently has Hayes Strokers on it, but it's not in my current budget right now.
Greyborg Warp Frame with Greyborg Cromotor aka "Monster Bike", 24 FET IRFB4115 EB324 Top Speed 42MPH (75V)
Greyborg Hub Motor, ZombieSS 24FET/36FET IRFB4115, Customized full suspension kids MTB. Top Speed 61 MPH (125V)
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Re: Greyborg Warp Build Planning

Postby Alan B » Sun Apr 15, 2012 2:36 pm

Looks like the Hygia Multi for tricycles.

Any suppliers for these?
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Re: Greyborg Warp Build Planning

Postby gensem » Sun Apr 15, 2012 2:51 pm

Hygia sells online for the end user.

I made an order on the dual front brakes like 10 days ago, we they arrive i ll take some pictures.
A decent 25mph bike will cost around $1000.
A decent 35mph bike will cost around $2000.
A $1000 35mph bike will get you killed.
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Re: Greyborg Warp Build Planning

Postby Alan B » Sun Apr 15, 2012 3:18 pm

gensem wrote:Hygia sells online for the end user.

I made an order on the dual front brakes like 10 days ago, we they arrive i ll take some pictures.


Excellent. Did you order them with the hall sensor built in?
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Re: Greyborg Warp Build Planning

Postby Alan B » Sun Apr 15, 2012 3:28 pm

Looks like Hygia uses Shimano XT/XTR size pads. Convenient.

They mention something about post mounting. I wonder if they have the proper adapters for the MTB forks.

http://www.hygia.com.tw/liveshop/index. ... duct_id=82
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Re: Greyborg Warp Build Planning

Postby zombiess » Sun Apr 15, 2012 4:40 pm

Alan B wrote:Looks like Hygia uses Shimano XT/XTR size pads. Convenient.

They mention something about post mounting. I wonder if they have the proper adapters for the MTB forks.

http://www.hygia.com.tw/liveshop/index. ... duct_id=82


when you order you select all the options, post mount, iso mount, hose length, adapters, rotor size /etc.
Greyborg Warp Frame with Greyborg Cromotor aka "Monster Bike", 24 FET IRFB4115 EB324 Top Speed 42MPH (75V)
Greyborg Hub Motor, ZombieSS 24FET/36FET IRFB4115, Customized full suspension kids MTB. Top Speed 61 MPH (125V)
9C 8x8, 24S2P LiPo, Lyen 12 FET, Diamondback Recoil Comp. Top Speed 42 MPH (100V)
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Re: Greyborg Warp Build Planning

Postby Alan B » Sun Apr 15, 2012 5:48 pm

Looks like they have a version with hall sensor for the rear brake as well.

How long does the hose need to be for a rear hydraulic Greyborg brake?
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Re: Greyborg Warp Build Planning

Postby Alan B » Sun Apr 15, 2012 6:06 pm

zombiess wrote:
Alan B wrote:Looks like Hygia uses Shimano XT/XTR size pads. Convenient.

They mention something about post mounting. I wonder if they have the proper adapters for the MTB forks.

http://www.hygia.com.tw/liveshop/index. ... duct_id=82


when you order you select all the options, post mount, iso mount, hose length, adapters, rotor size /etc.


OK, the brake calipers themselves are post mount. Looks good. Minimum hose length is 750mm to the splitter and 750 to the brakes. Probably a bit long for the front.

Stainless hose probably a good idea.

Ceramic pistons worthwhile?

Parking switch probably not worthwile.
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Re: Greyborg Warp Build Planning

Postby gensem » Mon Apr 16, 2012 6:40 am

Alan B wrote:
gensem wrote:Hygia sells online for the end user.

I made an order on the dual front brakes like 10 days ago, we they arrive i ll take some pictures.


Excellent. Did you order them with the hall sensor built in?



I tough about the sensor but because it was a front brake I did not ask for the hall option.
On the other hand I got It with steel hose and ceramic pistons.
A decent 25mph bike will cost around $1000.
A decent 35mph bike will cost around $2000.
A $1000 35mph bike will get you killed.
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Re: Greyborg Warp Build Planning

Postby Alan B » Mon Apr 16, 2012 6:58 am

It is an analog hall sensor (digital available special order) so it could be used for a linear regen input, or an adjustable threshold circuit made.

Might make sense to just get it in the rear brake, Hygia has an ebike single hydraulic brake set and it comes with the sensor in the handle. Price is quite a bit lower too since it is not a twin.
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Re: Greyborg Warp Build Planning

Postby Alan B » Wed Apr 18, 2012 6:35 pm

Ordered a Cycle Analyst V3 beta for this Greyborg. Will test it out first on the Novara unless the 'Borg is ready when it comes. There are some delays on the V3 beta shipment so not sure when it will arrive.
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Re: Greyborg Warp Build Planning

Postby Alan B » Sun Apr 22, 2012 6:20 am

The Cycle Analyst V3beta arrived! I will test it on the MTB.

Had a great day yesterday with Stevil. We installed the DUAL 4 pot Gatorbrakes on the forks with 160mm discs. I didn't even know that dual mirrored 4 pots were made, but there they are! I forgot to take pics, but the discs are pretty rad with sawtooth edges.

I got to test ride Stevil's 'Borg and wow does it feel great! Can't wait to get mine done!
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Re: Greyborg Recap

Postby Alan B » Mon Apr 23, 2012 12:05 pm

I have been getting a few questions on my Borg project, so I thought a recap might be in order.

I started this thread on Christmas Day about four months ago. My hardtail mountain bike was coming along nicely, but I wanted more. Better suspension. Better tires. More torque. The HT3525 I had just purchased was still in the box and I was already realizing it wasn't enough. On the Marin group trip I came very close to smoking my 9C 2810. It was really hot for hours, and didn't really have the torque even at 72V to make the climb well. On the work commute the rough roads and gravel were a bit more exciting and distracting than I like. It works, but I wanted more.

So I started looking at full suspension bikes. Downhill bikes are really nice, and expensive, and not suited for batteries, and not really the right suspension for street riding, or carrying loads. I'd like to have one for dirt, but that is a big project for another day.

I wanted a comfortable ebike with plenty of power for hills, plenty of capacity for longer rides, and lots of rubber to soak up the gravel, pavement, and thorns without excitement.

The Cromotor looked like the deal, and there was one available. I checked with Accountant to see when Greyborg frames would be available, and they had one left. :shock: I ordered them. I knew they were arranging a US dealer which would be a better way to go, but would not be ready for awhile. I also knew this was a significant project, and I have many other projects, so this was going to take a while. I have the other ebike so that's okay.

Pretty much every turn in this project has been delayed. I didn't expect anything else, so all is fine. The shipment took awhile. Some parts were missing (probably removed during shipment), so another shipment (great service from Accountant!). There was some shipping damage, so add some repairs. There are a lot of components on a bike, and the Greyborg I'm building is not using the most available stuff. Dual front discs are hard to come by. Stevil found some for me, THANKS! Four pot Gatorbrakes for Tadpole Trikes. Chainrings and crank arms for the ATS Schlumpf two speed crankset. Thanks to Accountant for the crank arms and Ebay for the 34T 110 BCD Chainring.

I wasn't looking for a racing machine, though Stevil has shown that it can be one, and Zombiess has shown that the Cromotor is racing capable as well. I'm really looking for what Hal was building - a really competent commuter. This Greyborg Warp can be both, apparently. :D

When I ordered the 'Borg I'm not sure I had a fully developed wheel plan, but the 17" Moped wheels appealed to me. I had a Motobecane Mobylette moped and put thousands of commute miles on it going to college. In years of use it had maybe one or two flats. I don't think I ever replaced a tire. It was a killer to pedal if you ran out of gas, and it was a dog going up the hill at work at 9 mph and pissing all the cars off. The brakes were almost good enough to stop me going back down that hill. But you had to anticipate the light or you might have to dig in your heels to get stopped. :D The suspension was better than nothing. The Greyborg Warp with Cromotor will so outperform the Moped in every way except range and recharge time. :P

So 17" Moped wheels with 2.5" tires are about 23.5" OD so comparable to 24" bike tires, pretty much. But instead of a few ounces of rubber you have over 4 pounds of 70 MPH DOT rated rubber. Serious stuff. I was going to use 2.5" Gazelles on both ends as recommended by JRH, but I liked the 3" that Stevil had on his rear tire which fits fine in the Borg frame, so I'm going to try that (2.5 front, 3.0 rear). More rubber! Depending on the battery complement this bike will be nearly 100 pounds, much like the Motobecane Mobylette moped was for weight.

Lacing the Cromotor into a rim is a challenge because it has about 3.8mm holes which is a bit large for 12 gauge spokes. 11 gauge might fit but those won't fit the moped rims. I suppose they are sized for motorcycle rims. So you can drill new spoke holes, or use washers. We'll try washers first.

On the front hub you have the opposite problem. This hub is made for dual discs but probably 13 gauge spokes. So it will have to be drilled out slightly to fit the 12 gauge spokes that the rim wants.

I was looking at Kiwi's beautiful Borg torque plate, but I was concerned that it might be a bit thin for this double-torque motor. Then I find out that the Cromotor has 16mm axles flatted to 10mm so they won't fit the Kiwi plate, and the axles are not really long enough to fit thick torque plates, and that no torque plates are needed if the Cromotor is seated fully forward in the horizontal Cromoly Steel Borg swingarm dropouts. So I bought half-link chain and plan to seat it fully forward. Stevil used a floating chainring (like Luke does) to provide the fine adjustment so the motor can be fully forward, so I can do that too if needed.

I was going to have Magudaman (who is also local here) make some custom torque plates, but there isn't room for them. I was also going to use the new alloy rims that JRH is having made, but they are way late and Stevil made me an offer I could not refuse. :) He's just over an hour from me so that avoids shipping.

The rear brake mount that Accountant supplies has a 12mm hole to go on the axle, so I'm not sure what to do there. Drilling it out to 16mm won't leave much material. I may need to have something fabricated. Perhaps Accountant has something for it now that the Cromotors are going to all have the 16mm axles? Didn't Luke say the rear brake was optional? Sheldon Brown doesn't seem to think they are needed much (see his encyclopedic bike website in the braking section). I will do a rear brake, though, and Regen. Soon.

Philistine had the Lyen 24 FET controller in his Borg, and I decided to follow that track. The 18 FET is undoubtedly adequate, but for solid reliability I wanted to go with the 24. I had Lyen build me one. Mine seems just a little to be too long to fit in my frame, but I'm going to review that again before I cut it shorter. Either way we'll get that in. But if you want an easier project choose a smaller controller. :)

I want to be able to pedal, both to get some exercise, and to be able to go on bike paths. Derailleurs are a problem, and the Borg isn't really set up for them, so I chose the ATS Schlumpf two speed planetary drive crankset (with excellent pricing from Accountant). With the 34 tooth chainring and the 16 tooth single speed freewheel I will get about 12mph in low gear, and about 20mph in high. A larger chainring could be used by leaving the plastic off the chainring side, perhaps fabricate a flat panel to go there.

For forks I have the Volcano set up for dual discs from Accountant. Nice pricing and should be adequate for commuting. Don't need too much travel, this isn't a downhill machine and I don't plan to jump it.

Stevil is helping me out with FSA Pig DH Pro headset and Ritchie adjustable stem. (Thanks!)

I took Oatnet's suggestion of a Cloud9 seat, and he also suggested adjustable stems. I have a seatpost but need to do some sanding to get it to fit in the tight seat tube.

I decided to go with the White Industries freewheel but find that it doesn't fit on the long motor threads as far down as it should (someone warned me about that), but I learned that it is machinable stainless so I can fix that. But I ordered a Dicta (which has threads all the way through) to start with, then I'll decide later to fit the White or not.

In the midst of my Borg build I was reading about the Mega Enduro ride that Lyen has chronicled, and its requirement for less than 20 watt hours per mile. That, and the long time in the saddle convinced me that I needed to try a recumbent for the occasional longer touring ride. I dialed up Craig's list and there was a bikeE just a few miles away, inexpensive, in good condition and barely used. I ignored it for nearly a week and then zoomed over there before someone else scooped it up. I put a BMC on it from Ilia at ebikessf. It is amazing but in no way replaces the Borg. It is light and efficient and wonderfully comfortable (aside from potholes), but for daily driving on rough and steep roads and competing with cars the Borg is preferred. I'll have them both. :D

So when is the Borg going to be on the road? Soon I'll have wheels, headset, stem, and some assembly to do. Still need to get the ATS Schlumpf installed, sort out axle spacers and chainline, figure out the rear brake (or temporarily skip it), mount some cover panels, and do the wiring.

AND the batteries. Stevil has a system for making up packs on the fly using the hardcase Turnigy bricks, he makes up a pack for what he needs and straps it in the Borg. Very clever and lightweight. I like the modularity.

I tend to think more in terms of a mounted pack and onboard charger that is more than adequate for the daily commute, and then a longrange secondary pack that is added when needed. Methods HVCLVC boards. The Cycle Analyst V3beta is in hand. But the battery pack is still theory. I'll probably start with 15S 8AH Zippy that I have sitting around, and then get some Turnigy 6S bricks and start aggregating a full set.

I have been looking at the ebikes.ca simulator. Thanks to Justin and zombiess for putting the Cromotor's measured data in there (NoName5004). It may not be perfectly accurate, but it is really useful to get some idea of how things are going to work.

I have the 2810 on 18S lipo at LVC of 3.6V on a 26" mountain bike (like my setup) to compare with the "CroBorg" (coined a new term there?). (this is done by selecting a 2807 and scaling the values since the 2810 is not there). This compared to the NoName5004 (which is model data based on some measured values from a Cromotor).

So I'm looking at 12/24S or 18S. Being an engineer I don't want to run my 100V 4110 FETs at 24S all the time. There's just not enough margin. So I thought about using a 12S/24S switching setup, then it would spend little time at 24S. But do I need 50 mph? That's just going to be trouble in so many ways. Sorry Luke. :)

So back to 18S. My original plan. How does that look? 2KW into the 9C, 4KW into the NoName5004, so very conservative. At Low Voltage Cutoff (3.6V) ( so it will be better than this ) the mountain bike with 9C 2810 gets 25 mph. That's about right, I see about 28-30 hot off the charger. What about the NoName5004 in 24" tires? Well it matches the 9C at 65% throttle. The efficiency of the NoName5004 is just slightly better than the 9C. Using better materials does make a difference. It rocks :)

So what about the rest of the throttle? The NoName5004 at 18S in 24" wheeled mountain bike makes 37 mph at LVC. Hot off the charger will break 40, especially in a tuck. On a recumbent with a 26" wheel, wow, look out 50. But I'm not going there now.

Thrust off the line is exactly double at 72.5 vs 145 pounds. The torque of the NoName5004 is just less than double the 9C at these power levels, but the smaller moped wheel makes the difference. :)

You can push both the 9C and the Cromotor a lot harder than this. These are efficient, conservative commuter power levels. I'm quite happy with 2KW in my 9C for most things, and doubling that should be really, really excellent. :)

So I'm looking for a good 170mm rear shock for the Borg, let me know if you have any leads!

Thanks to ES, Fetchter, Justin, Luke, Stevil, JRH, Oatnet, dogman, zombiess, methods, green machine, HAL, Accountant, icecube57, Philistine, amberwolf, Ilia, Lyen, grindz145, Kingfish, gcindc, markobetti (an incomplete list in no particular order) and all the other folks who have helped to make this happen!
Last edited by Alan B on Tue Apr 24, 2012 7:09 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Greyborg Recap

Postby zombiess » Tue Apr 24, 2012 1:46 am

Alan B wrote:I have been looking at the ebikes.ca simulator. Thanks to Justin and zombiess for putting the Cromotor's measured data in there (NoName5004). It may not be perfectly accurate, but it is really useful to get some idea of how things are going to work.


I'm not sure if Justin has gotten around to updating the simulator yet. The motor specs he put in there gave it overly optimistic performance. He and I talked by PM and I supplied him with the necessary data to update it and make it much more accurate, but last I heard from him he hasn't had the time. SWBluto's simulator has done good for me so far and is how I simulated the different scenarios I posted. I have a link to my esim file and also his simulator if you want to give it a shot. I'll try to check the bikes.ca sim tomorrow to see if Justin updated the data yet.
Greyborg Warp Frame with Greyborg Cromotor aka "Monster Bike", 24 FET IRFB4115 EB324 Top Speed 42MPH (75V)
Greyborg Hub Motor, ZombieSS 24FET/36FET IRFB4115, Customized full suspension kids MTB. Top Speed 61 MPH (125V)
9C 8x8, 24S2P LiPo, Lyen 12 FET, Diamondback Recoil Comp. Top Speed 42 MPH (100V)
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Re: Greyborg Warp Build Progress

Postby Philistine » Tue Apr 24, 2012 4:37 am

Re the 24 Fet controller in the Gborg frame, I should have noted to you Alan how tight the fit was. It really is a tight squeeze, but mine does fit without any rubbing etc.., but there is almost no tolerance, and I just presumed all 24 Fets were the same size. You can see in the photo below how tight it is, the bit on the left (outside the frame of the shot) is right against the end with no room to move, and you can see at the end in the photo (on the bottom right as you look at the photo) the end is right up against the frame. The tolerance is so tight it might be that your Gborg frame is slightly smaller in that part, it would only have to be a few mm to be too tight I guess.

I also built my battery boxes for the lipo about a mm too wide, so that the plastic canopy barely fits on and really stresses the bolt holes (some have cracked already). At some point I will glue tabs onto the canopy so I can get a few mm more clearance. (Apologies for the bad phone photo but you get the idea)

Gborg2.JPG
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Greyborg vs Zero

Postby Alan B » Thu Apr 26, 2012 11:42 am

Thanks for the updates, Philistine. With the curved tubes it is hard to say exactly how much interference there is with the controller, but it is not much. I'm going to spend more time fitting before cutting. Measure twice, cut once, etc.

On another note, I took a test ride yesterday of the Zero 2012 dual-sport. So now I've test ridden both Stevil's HT powered race-winning Greyborg and the Zero.

One interesting thing about the Zero. When I was first getting into ebikes and reading about the Zero the wife indicated she would rather I got an emotorcycle like the Zero than an ebike. Her reasoning was that the emoto could compete better with traffic and be safer. I had ridden a 500cc motorcycle for years without problems but haven't had a motorcycle for a long time.

It is interesting to compare them. For me there are two use cases they would both be used for. One is commuting to work, 13 miles, half 50mph limit highway along the lake and half windy hilly through the park 25mph limit. Actual speeds tend to run higher, of course. The other is dirt, camping, desert type uses which I won't cover here since I haven't tested either in that mode.

This was a brief test ride at work where the streets are narrow and pretty steep (7%) and the speed limit low. The seat on the dual-sport Zero is pretty high, but not a problem for me to straddle. It feels good, but on this short ride I won't be on it long enough to gauge its longterm comfort. The pegs are lightweight but effective which is the theme on the whole machine - they are working hard to keep the machine's weight down so they can save the weight budget for the battery. As you stand up the bike you feel the weight. Substantial, but less than my former motorcycle, a 500 cc water cooled shaft drive v-twin.

The kickstand is substantial but light, and easy to reach. It has a switch that interlocks the motor, so you can't power off until it is up, a nice safety feature. The throttle and front brake are on the right, on the left grip there is no clutch lever. The rear brake is on the right toe, the usual configuration for a USA motorcycle, aside from the missing clutch. The kill switch is on the right thumb, very similar to one I bought on ebay for my ebike. The dual mirrors are somewhat small and angular, probably designed to minimize air resistance while providing useful coverage. They seem to provide a useful view though not an expansive one. Having dual mirrors is nice, I've been doing single mirrors on my ebikes and I occasionally look for the missing right side mirror reflexively.

Flip the key on, the LCD speedo comes to life. Set the SPORT/ECO switch in ECO, make sure the kill switch is off. I'm starting on a gradient so holding the rear brake and rolling the throttle gently on, hear/feel some motor power pulses and release the brake, it rolls backward a bit. Quite a bit more throttle is required to get moving forward, and it takes off at a crawl. Incredible low speed low power control. You can easily ride at very low speed.

I did a loop around the hilly streets, gliding along and hitting the throttle progressively harder to see what it would do. No surprises. Good power, accelerates smoothly up hills. Competent. With my recent ebike experience I know they are managing this motor to keep it safe, cool and efficient, not pouring excess power into it. It feels like a good solid machine, not a thrill generating rocket. I flip the ECO switch to SPORT and test again. More powerful, still not a rocket. Feels good. Excellent brakes and throttle control. It is so easy to ride at near zero speed I almost forget to put my foot down at a stopsign. The extra high and forward weight of the battery makes this bike very easy to balance.

The turn signal control is spring loaded, so you can't leave it locked on, but the blinkers continue after it returns to center. I suspect it will time out, or you can cancel it by pushing it inward. Nice to have a turn signal, hand signalling on bikes creates some risks of its own. Turn signals on ebikes is a whole discussion of its own. But it feels good to have it, easy to use, and safe. I need to think about that more on my ebikes.

As I bring it back I need to turn it around on a gradient in the parking lot. The weight is noticeable, and the restricted steering angle. Much harder to maneuver around than an ebike which will turn much sharper plus you can always lift an end or even stand it on one wheel.

As I think back about the ride I realize I didn't notice the suspension. This is good, it works well, nothing to complain about.

So ebike vs Greyborg for my commute - how would that compare? The highway part of my commute is 50 mph with a wide shoulder, so with the emotorcycle (em/c) I could stick with traffic speed and save some time. Until it stacks up from too many cars. Then it is hard to stay legal and thread through it on the em/c. I see motorcycles threading into the bike lane, not supposed to do that, but they occasionally do.

On this part of the route the ebike has a pretty nice (most of the way) wide lane to itself. Not as clean, not always clear (disabled vehicles and clutter end up in the bike lane). So you can move along at bike speeds while the cars whiz by (watch them carefully though, some wander into the bike lane). Running high speeds in the bike lane is not a great idea, it just isn't that clutter-free. If the ebike will do 55 mph one could merge into the car lane, and that would be safer, but not really legal. My Greyborg is not being set up for 55, though it is possible to do that with over 100 volts.

When the cars stack up sliding alongside them in the bike lane at 20 mph is nice. It can save more time than was lost earlier if the stack is very deep. Then I peel off and turn into the hills, winding and climbing. The speed limit is 25, there are lots of corners, and the pavement is not good nor the roads wide. Here the Zero would be in its element, fun, perfect. Easily able to slide past the lycras which the cars have trouble passing. Possible to pass the slow cars safely. Fun. The ebike is not bad, a strong one like the Greyborg will keep speed equal to most cars, so the danger of getting passed would be minimized. Both Zero and Greyborg are excellent for this part of the trip, but Zero would be a bit faster.

Arriving at work the Zero would have to be parked outside. Finding a place with a power outlet to charge from would be a challenge. I might be able to get an extension cord or outlet positioned to use. Hard to predict. The Borg can be brought into my office. Out of the weather, away from prying eyes and fingers, and charging is no problem. Bringing a heavy ebike in up a few stairs and in the door is a bit of a challenge, but not hard. Make sure those lipos don't flare up indoors. :shock:

Taking the bikes places is also quite different. The em/c would require a trailer. I have one, but it is a hassle to load, unload and park with it. The bike rack is a lot easier to deal with. Hopefully my bike rack will be up to the Borg's weight, being a bit more than the usual bike. :)

It was a fun test ride, and I'd like to have a Zero. Someday perhaps I will get one. Thanks for the test ride, Dean of Pleasanton Mastercraft!
-- Alan W6AKB eESP, GreyBorg, eBikeE BMC, myEbikes, ezPCBs and Thanks to ebikes.ca for rescuing this forum!
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Re: Greyborg Warp Build Progress

Postby Alan B » Thu Apr 26, 2012 3:53 pm

Progress Report from Stevil: :D

Image
-- Alan W6AKB eESP, GreyBorg, eBikeE BMC, myEbikes, ezPCBs and Thanks to ebikes.ca for rescuing this forum!
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Re: Greyborg Warp Build Progress

Postby chroot » Thu Apr 26, 2012 4:07 pm

Zero motorcycle ZF9 model is very nice e-motorcycle and I have thought about this one sometime in future I might purchase next year.

Thanks for details! :lol:
Thank you Justin Lemire-Elmore - You are a HERO!

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Re: Greyborg Warp Build Progress

Postby Alan B » Sat Apr 28, 2012 1:11 am

24 FET controller Fits!

Earlier I reported that the Lyen 24 FET controller did not fit in my Borg frame. Tonite I got it out and tried again. It still did not fit. Best I could judge was an interference of about 1/4" between the frame tube and controller case.

So I removed the electronics, put the aluminum case in the chop saw, and cut off 3/8".

Now it fits.

Please don't try this at home unless you have an aluminum cutting rated blade in your saw. I used a 120 tooth carbide blade in a 12" chop saw. I cut slowly and held the case very still, better yet clamp it. Clean up all the aluminum chips from the box and reinstall the controller, taking care to torque the heatsink screws carefully and evenly. Make sure the heatsink compound is not disturbed or loaded with aluminum chips.

Now it Drops In!
-- Alan W6AKB eESP, GreyBorg, eBikeE BMC, myEbikes, ezPCBs and Thanks to ebikes.ca for rescuing this forum!
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Re: Greyborg Warp Build Progress

Postby Alan B » Sat Apr 28, 2012 9:09 am

Anyone ordered a custom Yasusu shock for the Greyborg?

Hal recommended:

Yasusu BNCP401

Apparently they do custom setups, bushings, etc to suit your setup. But their web page is not clear on how to specify that.
-- Alan W6AKB eESP, GreyBorg, eBikeE BMC, myEbikes, ezPCBs and Thanks to ebikes.ca for rescuing this forum!
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Re: Greyborg Warp Build Progress

Postby gensem » Sat Apr 28, 2012 11:42 am

Alan B wrote:Anyone ordered a custom Yasusu shock for the Greyborg?

Hal recommended:

Yasusu BNCP401

Apparently they do custom setups, bushings, etc to suit your setup. But their web page is not clear on how to specify that.


I have one 401 (Hal´s advice too)... im not using it yet, but the construction is very good for 50 bucks.
A decent 25mph bike will cost around $1000.
A decent 35mph bike will cost around $2000.
A $1000 35mph bike will get you killed.
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