My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Lightweight / Folding / Portable EVs - seats optional

Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby swbluto » Thu Feb 19, 2009 1:24 am

During the middle of another exciting adventure to somewhere I would've never gone to before, I found that the motor would spin without spinning the timing pulley. Uh-oh - I thought maybe the set screw broke or something. Another exciting bus+walking trip home and I found the verdict was a set-screw that loosened itself. Hmmm... so it seems like these set screws need something a little more to keep them in place. Is there a particular version of loc-tite that's preferred for these? You know... something that can be easily removed.

Anyways, here's a rough cost analysis using approximate figures.

$70 - scooter.
$4 - Oak to create custom mount.
$10 - timing pulley
$20 - Mr.Tuffy for the tires.
$20 - new heavy-duty inner-tubes.
$100 - Motor including shipping.
$175 - Castle creations controller.
$25 - Various electronic components(Things I already had so not a big deal.).
$20 - Odds and ends
------------------------------------------
$444 Not including the battery.

The battery ended up explicitly costing another $30 since I broke the BMS during the process of modding it, so the total figure is 474. With the Ping battery being $370, a "From the beginning" cost would've been around 814 dollars. So, it's only cost me an extra 400 dollars for one nifty, high speed and nimble scooter that's not only light but also fairly versatile. Its final weight is around 19 pounds, which is certainly carry-able and I'm able to take it aboard the bus and inside buildings without much trouble. It's enabled a certain amount of exploration I wouldn't take otherwise and I definitely foresee many future adventures with this handy companion. Fortunately, some technology of Back to the Future is here.

(Well, it's not hovering and it doesn't go over water... but it's light, quick and compact unlike so many leaden department store varieties.)
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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby swbluto » Sat Feb 21, 2009 12:47 pm

Almost killed myself Friday by jutting into the road when it seemed like there weren't any cars coming out of the corner of my eye but one suddenly became visible as I turned onto the roadway to cross it. As I wasn't directly looking it, I don't have a clear idea of its distance, but it appeared to be about 10 to 40 feet away traveling at around 20-30 mph and I had this characteristic sense of impending danger, where I'm anticipating some very odd, suddenly different experiences(i.e., me thrown off my scooter, I'm suddenly on the ground wondering what went on or I find myself in a very tired state in a hospital bed two days later as I slowly awake).

It's clear I need to establish some definitive rules when it comes to safety and I'll definitely need to add a mirror. One comes to mind. "Look both ways before crossing"... :roll:, so simple but yet sometimes so easily ignored when a seeming opportunity presents itself.

On another note, some component of my motor seems to have a developed a definitely noticeable clicking sound. I first noticed it several days ago, but it seemed to come and go. But, then, all of a sudden, the motor started spinning madly without spinning the wheel... apparently the set screw securing the timing pulley/"belt sprocket" became loose. I retightened it and hoped that would solve it, but now I'm getting this clicking sound again and it's become consistent to the point of being present while the motor isn't engaged(I was kind of embarrassed taking it around campus as I thought it'd give a wrong impression of what electric vehicles sound like.). ... Uhhh ohhh... I found that it develops with there's tension on the motor shaft(the belt is tight) and a similar sound was heard when slightly loosening the set screw and then quickly spinning the timing pulley. It went away and it seems the set screw made itself tight against the timing pulley. Thinking I could just "tighten" it and it'd automatically recenter, I was wrong. So, now I know the set screw can gradually become loose and hide the symptoms during its progress. So, I've picked up some loc-tite and I'm going to apply that to the screw today and test the scooter out Monday.
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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby fechter » Sat Feb 21, 2009 1:10 pm

Loctite is good. Put some between the sprocket and the shaft too.
I use two set screws 90 deg. apart on the sprocket, which helps too, but you still need Loctite.
Go easy on the set screw threads so you can remove it later if you need to.

My Zappy had a similar clicking sound when one of the bearings got loose in the hub. I got rid of it by tightening the axle bolt.
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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby swbluto » Sat Feb 28, 2009 1:53 am

I went hard on the threads as I don't want to even give it a chance of coming loose. In the worst case scenario, it just seems I have to heat using a mini-torch(Which I have!) and removing it becomes easy.

After letting it dry for almost 6 days, I put it on and the clicking was present from the get-go and it lasted all through my ride. Oh, hmmmmm..... It must be something else(But at least I hopefully prevented it from coming loose again!).

So I traveled about 2 miles in one direction, I visited Arby's(I never go there! Wow, I love this mobility. I used to like it with a car, but there's just something cool about a souped-up light scooter that excites me like no other. Like, the fact it costs so little to operate.) and I went 2 miles back. About a mile of it had a pretty persistent 2-4% up grade hill and the scooter seemed to never go below 15 mph which was really nice. After about traveling 1.5 miles, my scooter cut-out. Thinking that it might've been my thermal protection circuit, I measured the temp using a handy-dandy IR thermometer I got from Fry's(I love that store! They're like the Radio Shack I've never had because I apparently was born too late in the 21st century.), and it reported a varying temperature between "212" and "Hi"(It does that when it gets over its maximum which is about 225 degrees) with the hottest temperatures tending to be directly on the accessible part of the heat-sink. Yep, it's working... :lol: I waited for it to cool off and I expedited the process by exposing to the 38 degree air outside... 5 minutes later, yay, it's nice and cool again!

So, the moral of the story is, I need to start trying to adapt these small CPU coolers and fans I bought from Fry's. :roll: But the problem of the thermal energy being trapped within the back is still there. Even if I may transfer the thermal energy to the air inside the back-pack, I imagine that would just simply heat up the entire backpack's compartment(Although the controller's average temp would hopefully be much lower.).
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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby swbluto » Mon Mar 02, 2009 11:55 pm

OK, just got done modding the controller. The first picture is what the top looks like when I took the "Phoenix HV 85 Castle" sticker off the case and cut out the shrink-wrap plastic so that I could fill in the depression with tin foil and attach that to the heat sink. I compressed the tin foil as much as possible to remove the not-so-heat conductive air gaps.
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Cut out plastic
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Attached electric tape to insulate the electronics from the tin foil.
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Inserted multiple-folded over tin foil.
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Used heat transfer compound, heat sink and a couple of rubber bands and voila!
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It seems like the bottom half of the heat sink isn't immediately thermally connected to top half, so I inserted a little tin foil into the gaps to hopefully improve thermal transfer to the "cool side". Now I just need to add on an appropriate 12 volt regulator that can supply .15 amps on the circuit board and wire it up.
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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby recumpence » Tue Mar 03, 2009 7:53 am

That system works to a degree. However, I would recommend two smaller fans rather than one large one. Each small fan could be mounted to each side of the controller. That is required to reach all the green heat sinks and FETs. That is because there are 3 boards with FETs on both sides of each board and each of the green heat sinks (there are 3 separate heat sinks) can get cooling air. So, your large heat sink only reached the top panel of FETs (1/6th of them).

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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby swbluto » Tue Mar 03, 2009 12:59 pm

The problem is that it isn't very easy for me to find two small fans in my city, as the only place I know of that sells small cooling fans at all are the more comprehensive electronics stores like Fry's and they had limited stock(like 1).

Anyways, to try to help ameliorate the issue you brought up, I tried to add aluminum foil in between the gaps between the top half and bottom half of the heat sinks to facilitate thermal transfer there. After reading your post, I also tried to mount on the other small fan on the other side of the controller and while it doesn't seem powerful, it seems like it should provide some nice air flow on the top and sides. The part of the aluminum foil in between the gaps that sticks out I also bent upwards in an effort to deflect more of the airflow onto the heat sinks.
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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby swbluto » Sat Mar 07, 2009 2:50 am

Ok, since the last update, I found out the knocking sound came from the set-screw that was loose. Apparently it was loose after the loctite dried, so I twisted the hex key just a little harder than usual and it became tight again. Let's hope the loctite makes it difficult for the screw to screw itself loose, even after twisting it to tighten it.

I didn't try running the fans tonight because I just finished up with the scooter's mechanicals and I wanted to ride before midnight(And it's sounding good! Although, I fear I'll have to tinker with it eventually. I think the next time I take the motor out due to set-screw loosening issues, I'll drill a hole right through the shaft and install a spring-pin or something like that.), but checking the temperature on the controller at several points throughout the ride and it was hovering at 90-110 degrees(including the parts of the controller that aren't closest to the giant cpu cooler). Wow! That heat sink really makes a difference. I think I may not even bother running the fans, as it appears the 1A 12V regulator heats up to 200 degrees or so dishing out .22 amps to power the fans(It doesn't have a heat sink but it shouldn't need one, should it if it's getting fed 22 volts?). I also found out the main transistor I use to drop the voltage for the regulator to supply 5v to the digital circuitry(It draws something like .15 amps) gets to over 200 degrees in operation. It hasn't exploded yet but what the heck? It's supposed to be an 8A darlington. It hasn't been problematic before, save the melted rubber-maid top, but it soon became problematic when I eventually discovered that upon the rubber maid container solidifying and the top bouncing around during the ride, it ended up pulling the 8A darlington out of the breadboard. It kept cutting out every 1/2 mile or so and I didn't find out until I got home and opened the container and there the darlington transistor was dangling from the lid having embedded itself, haha. Maybe I should use one of these 15A audio amplifiers I have... oh, but they have a low gain it seems and I don't want to mess with a complicated darlington pair.

I feel like I need to solidify this circuit and make a hard-copy pronto. I think I may add data-logging capability and usb functionality, as well. :mrgreen: It'd be neat to get detailed diagnostics when connecting it to my laptop, but I can imagine all the work involved.
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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby swbluto » Tue Mar 17, 2009 1:43 am

I finally added USB functionality but I don't yet have my SD breakout board so no data logging... yet! It can store temporary variables in its memory, but it isn't great enough to store very detailed data about an entire ride and it disappears when you disconnect the power. Using this temporary memory, I was recording to find out its highest current when studdering from a stop(the controller studders the motor a little at the beginning, but it soon syncs within the motor within a second so it's not a problem. If you start with the slightest push forward(like 1 mph), it'll sync nearly instantly.) and it turned out to be 19 amps or 4 amps over my programmed limit. That doesn't sound bad, methinks. I think I may up this battery's current limit to 25 amps or so just I can taste its power. :lol: Or maybe not. I think I'll get finished with my "current splicer" with some high-C batteries(likely a123s if they're going in my back pack) and then I'll be unleashing high power. I'm thinking of adding a button to the handle bar to turn on the "nitro", so to say, for when I want to accelerate quickly, go up hills fast or just plain go fast(as if 25 mph wasn't enough, I could go 37! But, yeah, I would probably get hurt if I did that.).

Seriously, though, if I get a123s, I'll probably be getting ~4.4 Ah of them to satisfy the range of battery current I desire and with the 4-6 mile range I'd get with that, I may just elect to abandon my ping batteries except for the longest of journies. 4-6 miles is good enough because, hey, it becomes uncomfortable standing on this scooter for more than 1.5 miles and it's really designed as a short-trip machine anyways, connecting those .5-1.5 mile destinations off the bus line.
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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby swbluto » Thu Mar 19, 2009 7:38 pm

My scooter has been cutting out on a predictable basis. I found the problem was that the battery was cutting-out, and I measured its cell voltages and they were still pretty high, so I suspect it's an over-current cutout. The circumstances it happens under, however, is "normal" and not ones that'd draw particularly high current and this has only recently cropped up so I suspect some of the coding changes I've made would've made it do this, so it's back to the debugging board.
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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby swbluto » Thu Mar 19, 2009 9:08 pm

Nothing abnormal cropped up in debugging, so I built a load tester for the battery. I used the circuit I built to serve as an ammeter and for the load I used nichrome wire from a heater and attached to it by alligator clips. I then submerged this under water and the water served as a very effective heat sink(It has high thermal conductivity AND heat capacity - can it get any better?). After drawing 15 amps, the battery cut out after about 4 seconds or so so I need to get to really repairing the battery pronto - it seems my circuit is actually working fine, then.
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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby swbluto » Sun May 03, 2009 2:16 am

Ok, just several updates.

My battery was crapping out due to a parallel cell group that was known to cut out at 7ah, as opposed to nominal 10ah, about a year ago. I think it's been worsening since then, so I replaced it. During testing, somehow the BMS screwed up and its over-amp protection wouldn't come on and the fets were getting kind of hot during use(Like smoking), Arggg.... Oh well, I reasoned, I'm only drawing 15 amps on my scooter so it shouldn't burn the fets too badly.

I ended up not testing the battery pack since it was dark at night and the robotics society meeting was tomorrow and I just *had* to show it off. So, the next day I went and during the middle of my bus ride, I found out the back tire was pretty flat - like 20 psi flat - Not so completely flat that you couldn't ride on it, but definitely a "squishy" kind of flat that really sucked energy and slowed you down tremendously. Thinking, eh, just a little more energy used than average... I went to the robotics meeting. Climbed a freaking huge 300 ft. 10% hill to get there and I didn't really "push my scooter" all the way since... well, I haven't done load testing of that magnitude, yet and I knew the motor was consuming mega-amps going only 6 mph or so. Anyways, I finally got to the meeting, blah blah, people were mildly impressed, someone said "you did good son" and then there was a cool presentation on these wirelessly communicating poet-mixing "electronic birds" performed by the department at the university that I'm currently taking a class from and aspiring to be accepted to. Anyways, the meeting ended, I took the bus down the hill and then I got off and started scooting to Fry's electronics that only laid a mile *points* that way! On the way, the scooter started to get REALLY REALLY SLOW. I thought, eh, that's odd... it must be the flat tire. Eventually I abandoned powering the scooter at all because it was getting so freaking weak and I had to walk for about .4 miles or so and I grabbed a pocket multimeter while I was Fry's and tested the battery and... oh dear, 34 volts. It's usually 42-43 volts at its cut-off lowest. I thought, yeah, I should carry my portable pump with me at all times - I could possibly mount it in part underneath the scooter, so not too much of a burden. So, I pulled the battery out of the back pack and OMG... it looked like two cells near the middle of the pack where I replaced the cells just started ballooning! They were like freaking lithium balloons! I thought maybe they were going to exploded or something given the obvious "stretch marks" on the outside. I dumped the battery out as cautiously as I could and then after awaiting a few seconds to be assured it wasn't going to explode, I measured the voltage on these two lithium cell balloons. Oh, an oh so ominous 0 volts. Bummer. Several others also went well below their typical LVC but I've successfully recharged those but I don't know what their capacity is, yet. I'm sure I'll find out.

Swearing off ping's BMS, I then sought out "individual chargers" and an LVC board. The former I bought from voltphreaks and the latter I am designing. I still need to stitch my battery together to make it operable(the balloons have been removed) and I'll be hooking up my LVC design board soon enough so to give it LVC protection. For protection, I won't be hooking up mosfets to cut off its discharge, instead I'll be using a piezo-electric buzzer to buzz me when it gets low. Right now, I haven't built the circuit and I'm not entirely sure how much noise I can expect on the control lines, but I'm basically going to have an 10 to 1 ratio on the ADC so 10mV of noise would appear as 100 mV to the detector. Not the best in the west, but as long as I give it a pretty comfortable margin from 2 volts, I should be fine.

Anyways, I just ordered two dewalt new 36 volt packs on eBay so I'll be getting that soon enough to work with! I'm thinking of using it as a "booster on demand" pack as most of the terrain I scoot on is pretty comfortable at 20 mph(i.e., sidewalks/pathways with due caution at cut-outs/"drive ways") but the occasional road way seems like it'd be safer at a higher speed(Might actually be counterproductive as... well, what would happen if my tire blew out? Would I be thrown into the opposing lane? What if someone pulled out in front of me?) and I need the current for the occasional hill. I'm sure once I get it hooked up, I'll get to learn the limits of my motor. I'm thinking of limiting the total current with the boost enabled to 50-60 amps or so(that's only 60*30=1800 watts to the motor - hopefully it'll survive) and I may need to shape the throttle curve to make the speed more adjustable. I'm thinking(Well, I've calculated it using the spread-sheet I created) this would cause my ping to give out 15 amps or so and the a123s would give 10c or 45 amps. Since I'm planning on operating at higher limited currents, it's going to be a necessity to hook up temp sensors to the motor, controller(it fell of, lol) and possibly the ping battery. Anyways, I'm projecting the a123s would provide 45 amps for roughly 6 minutes so I think it would last me, uhhh... 5-7 miles on the straight and I'm guessing somewhere around 1.5-2 miles going up hills. So, as a booster, I think it should work fine.

Also, in regards to my custom controller, I've added an SD card data logger and an LCD screen kind of like the CycleAnalyst. I'm planning on throwing up information about temps, currents and voltages and the such on the screen so I can actively monitor everything in real time. The major thing I need to do is find a water-proof housing for the LCD screen and start laying down the wires. I also want to exchange those pesky tiny RC servo connectors with a single serial cable connector and see how that works out.
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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby swbluto » Sun May 03, 2009 3:24 am

I'm also thinking about tying the throttle amount to the current limit rather than the "max servo pulse width". That way, it should actually seem like the throttle's responsive since the current is being limited almost all over the throttle range at a mere 15 amps. It'd also be nice for limiting the current directly should something be getting a little too hot. :mrgreen:

And, assuming no mechanical break-downs, my simulator is suggesting I'll be zooming up hills at 25+ mph! OMG. That'd be absolutely lovely. I'm getting worried about my controller, though, since it would be current limited. So, yeah, I'll definitely be doing progressive testing and souping up cooling as needed.
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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby swbluto » Sun May 03, 2009 8:16 pm

I just had a relevation with miles at viewtopic.php?f=28&t=10053 and it seems my scooter's stock belt just isn't good enough for the power I was aspiring to. It seems a 25mm width belt running on a 20-tooth pulley would work well, but then I'd have to get a back pulley(On the wheel) that sticks out a little more, methinks and it seems the gear-ratio wouldn't be anywhere near optimal. Also, while I was discovering the power limits of my stock belt, I found it that it might be underpowered for its current usage! So, I wonder, is that where that clicking sound might be coming from? A slipping belt?

So, it seems my a123 order might have been practically useless. Oh well, I guess I'm going to be making my bike run off an outrunner sooner than I thought. :)

(And my dream of an ultra-powerful tiny electric-scooter has been flushed down the drain. There are actual mechanical power limits to small drive-trains. Hmmm... I kind of wonder what a chain's power limit would be? Maybe there's hope, yet!)
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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby recumpence » Sun May 03, 2009 8:28 pm

For a tiny high power unit, I would run a small pitch chain. A #25 chain, for instance, has multiple time the power handling of a 15mm wide, 5mm pitch belt.

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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby kfong » Sun May 10, 2009 11:55 am

Go to allelectronics.com. They have currie scooter parts and chains. I placed an order from them recently for cheap brushed motors and picked up all kinds of surplus scooter parts. Can't beat the price.

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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby swbluto » Sun May 10, 2009 10:12 pm

Oh, well, the new update seems to be that my belt will just wear out faster than normal industrial levels(Which, they being on the orders of years of operational time I imagine, 100 hours would work for at least a year.) when exceeding the ratings. So I'll continue with the belt and see how it goes.

On another note, this scooter feels dreamy. I'm not sure how to describe it, but if you can imagine how removed you are from "standard life" during a dream with a hint of euphoria, that's how I feel just riding this thing. It's a really weird sensation. I guess that be because of my childhood dream(originated at 9 years old, I believe) was to develop an "anti gravity" board like Back to the Future's mattel version, and it seems like this approximates that goal quite closely. I don't think I can ride this well in a desert or other non-paved surfaces, unlike I theoretically could with a real anti-gravity board, but it comes close to the result of an anti-gravity board in urban settings.
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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby rs-racer » Fri May 15, 2009 12:00 pm

How fast wil i go with that motor on 24V?
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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby fechter » Fri May 15, 2009 12:45 pm

I use a 5m-15 HTD belt on my souped up Zappy. It's lasted over 400 mi so far (made by Goodyear).

On the motor sprocket, you might try putting Loctite on the bore of the sprocket as well as the screw threads. This will eliminate any play between the sprocket and the motor shaft which will reduce the likelyhood of the screws loosening. I used the blue stuff. It comes off OK with a bit of force.
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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby swbluto » Fri May 15, 2009 1:36 pm

rs-racer wrote:How fast wil i go with that motor on 24V?


That depends quite a bit on the type of batteries you have and the sprocket ratio. But, assuming you have at least 4Ah of a123s or >15C lipo and you gear it for the highest speed on flat-land, my simulator suggests 32 mph. With my current stock gear ratio, it'd be about 30 mph. I just got my dewalt battery packs in so I just need to take them apart and start the soldering process(OMG, only 60 contacts to solder now. :shock:), but I suspect I won't get that done for some time since it's a lot of work and I don't have much available free time (I also need to get a special torx t-10 screwdriver... garsh, mother, grrr....). Anyways, it'd be running at about 33 volts which would give me 37 cruising speed but, seriously, I don't want to find out what happens if my tires blow(Which it seems tires occasionally do, and small scooter tires seem more vulnerable due to holding a bit less air. I'm wondering if I should add the Slime just to simply slow down the "blow out" process so I won't get seriously injured.), so I'll definitely be limiting it to 25 mph or so on the occasional roadway or generously wide and open multi-use path.

Also, I changed out the tiny two servo connectors(a pain to connect) to a serial cable connector. It seems like it might come off easily(And, no, I'm not going to use the screw terminals), so I'm not sure how appropriate that'll be (I really need to find a suitable connectors... I'm seriously thinking that cat5 network connectors are my best bet), however, I've also switched the side of the scooter where the power and data connectors connect so now I can push freely with my oh-so-comfortable right foot. So, hopefully, cable disconnects won't be a problem and riding this thing won't be as awkward.

Anyways, fechter, what kind of power are you running at? It's reassuring to know that your timing belt has lasted so long. I don't think I'll be going 400 miles per year, so hopefully the belt will last over 6 months.
Last edited by swbluto on Fri May 15, 2009 1:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby rs-racer » Fri May 15, 2009 1:41 pm

I have two 12V 12A battery's. I would be happy with 20/25 MPH, what would be the runtime?
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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby swbluto » Fri May 15, 2009 2:48 pm

Ahhhhh, it sounds like you're talking about SLA batteries. They are quite a different beast(And quite deficient)! I found my 24V 12Ah SLAs were good for about 20 amps and they lasted for 6-7 ahs and their output voltage was something like 10V each at 20 amps. If you limit it to 20 amps, using my simulator, it appears you could expect 5-6 miles at 18 mph. Going up hills are just out of the picture with those, as you need amps and SLAs generally don't put out much without significantly dropping the voltage. Also, I'd think you'd need to limit the amperage as you'll kill the batteries rather quickly if you don't actively limit it. It appears the motor likes to draw 50 amps with ordinary gear ratios which would hit a 12Ah SLA rather hard.
Last edited by swbluto on Sat May 16, 2009 1:34 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby fechter » Fri May 15, 2009 6:39 pm

swbluto wrote:Anyways, fechter, what kind of power are you running at? It's reassuring to know that your timing belt has lasted so long. I don't think I'll be going 400 miles per year, so hopefully the belt will last over 6 months.


It's hard to say exactly since I never had it fully instrumented. I'd estimte around 1.5kw. It climbs a 10% grade at about 17mph. Runs around 20mph on flat ground.
"One test is worth a thousand opinions"
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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby rs-racer » Sat May 16, 2009 12:36 am

Yes i'm talking about SLA battery's. I want to use them for a while and then switch to lipo's. I'm goining to order HXT 63-74 motor with the 100A super simple controller, motor mount and servo tester.
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Re: My Outrunner-Upgraded Small Light Viza Volt Scooter

Postby swbluto » Sat May 16, 2009 1:30 am

Ok. Make sure to check out the ebike's non-hub section before making any significant investments you might regret. That's where the "RC crowd" hangs out, so they have tons of experience with various products. In particular, I haven't heard too many good things about Hobby-City's controllers but I haven't really messed with them, so I wouldn't personally know.
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