Epik Whistler

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magic carpet
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Epik Whistler

Post by magic carpet » Sep 10, 2012 8:51 pm

Hi E-Bikers,
Bought my second ebike today, even though I've only got a couple hundred miles on my Bionx SL 350 equipped, Opus Zermatt. At the end of the Toronto Bike Expo trade show, a small west coast company didn't want to ship their samples home so they dutch auctioned them. The deal was to good to pass up and a test ride sold me. It's a mid drive, entry level, mountain bike with front suspension, 26" tires, and an 8 spd rear cassette/derailleur and is called an Epik Whistler. Accelerating through the gears feels like I'm riding my old Suzuki GS750! The difference between mid-drive and hub motor is very similar to standard transmission and automatic transmission sportscars. The Epik's proprietorial, coaxial motor is quite a honking chunk of metal, and really pulls in each gear, coming into it's optimal rpm range. Not unlike the torque curve of a multi valved, overhead cam, ICE.
I love my Bionx/Opus for it's vintage roadbike styling and silky, silent, hubmotor power, but I'm surprised by how fun the buzzy little crank drive bike is, with it's arm stretching performance, and engaging and effective transmission. The Bionx/Opus makes a better urban commuter and is a 'one of a kind', 'stylee' ride. Passing cyclists have lauded me for staying in the saddle on steep climbs, unaware of the e-assist! The Epik, though nicely finished in white on white with red trim, is generic MTB, and though very stealthy with it's waterbottle style, LiMide (TM) battery, makes a whirring noise, that would be a dead giveaway on the bikepath, but a blast on the trail.
Although I've been an eboater for years, I've wanted an ebike for almost as long, and now I have two. As different as night and day!
Life is good.
Mike :wink:


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full-throttle
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Re: Epik Whistler

Post by full-throttle » Sep 10, 2012 11:18 pm

Is this it?
Image
Image
http://epikbike.com/whistler.aspx
Technical Specs
Max Motor Speed: 	32km/h (as limited by controller)
Speed Range:            Up to 45 km (varies with terrain and pedaling)
Battery:                Lithium rechargeable, 37V, 8.8 Ah
Weight:                 21 kg (2.5 kg is battery weight)
Frame: 	                Al alloy, high quality MTB frame (18" frame)
Tires: 	                26" x 1.95" Kenda, 26x1.95 K857
Wheels/Spokes:          High quality double walled rims, stainless steel spokes
Brakes- Front: 	        Tektro AURIGA COMP Hydraulic Disc Brake
Brakes- Rear: 	        Tektro AURIGA COMP Hydraulic Disc Brake
Gears: 	                Shimano Alivio 8 speeds
Front Fork: 	        SR Suntour XCT, 80mm Travel Suspension front fork
Handlebars: 	        Al alloy - Flat bar
Chainwheel: 	        EPIK chainring, 42T
Chain: 	                KMC Chain
Saddle:                 Velo Saddle
Grips: 	                Velo Ergonomic Grips
Stand: 	                Alloy Side kickstand
Motor Type: 	        Brushless DC Motor, 36V
Output Power: 	        350 W
Control Panel: 	        led 790 / J-lcd
Assistance Mode: 	Low / Med / High
Rear Cassette: 	        Shimano 8 Speeds Cassette 11/32T
Rear Derailluer: 	Shimano ALivio 8 Speeds Derailleur
Total Width: 	        600 mm (or less)
Wheel Base: 	        1100 mm

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Re: Epik Whistler

Post by magic carpet » Sep 11, 2012 8:00 am

Thanks Fullthrottle, yup, that's her.
I dropped her off at my LBS for a tune-up on the way home from BikeExpo. The sales rep assembled it at the show, and hadn't adjusted the derailleur or brakes, and I couldn't wait to get rid of those red tires! I'll remount them on their own rims for off-road use, but most of my riding is around town, so I'm putting on streets for now.
I made a couple calls to the left coast where there are several dealers who carry them and all reports were favourable. Of course the bike is too new for them to speak to reliability, but buyers there are happy so far. One Vancouver shop I spoke with has been working with Epik through development and filled me in on the company history. The motor design is there own, I'm told. Dr. Battery is partnered with Epik and brings some good tech to the table. Some details, such as the downtube battery mount, are nicer than the Bionx. The Bionx mount is stamped, unfinished steel, but Epik's is extruded and powder coated aluminum.The battery connectors are two bullet shaped studs as opposed to the Bionx which has a standard computer style multi pin jack built in. My Bionx had a bent flange on the jack when I picked it up from the shop, which I had to straighten with some needle nosed pliers. That can't happen with the DR. Battery design.
They call their batteries 'Lithium Imide' (TM), but they are basically Lithium Ion with Graphite replacing the Aluminum foil conductor. Dr. Battery is a subsidary of Leyden Power, who have been developing their own cell design for computers and other devices for several years. They claim increased duty life (up to 1600 charging cycles) and wider operating temperature range (-20f to 140f) as advantages to their formula. They also claim greater power to weight density, but I don't see how that could be possible by the substitution of graphite for aluminum. Maybe it has something to do with the shape of the cells which are elliptical as opposed to round cylinders?
Unlike the Bionx, Epik seems less proprietorial and more easily adaptable to other batteries, motors and controllers, should reliability become a problem.
I have only ridden one other mid drive, the Luxor, and the Epik feels quite a bit quicker and responsive. The Epik computer screen has one feature I really
appreciate and that is an easily resettable speed limiter. First thing I did was change it from 32k to 40k. She feels quick, but I really won't know until I get the gears working smoothly.
With two bikes, I'm looking forward to bringing friends on their first ebike rides, riding off road with the crankdrive and having a spare for when the Bionx is in the shop. I'll try to report back objectively with a comparison between these two fundamentally different designs once I get this d..n cast off my leg.

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Re: Epik Whistler

Post by magic carpet » Sep 11, 2012 8:00 am

Thanks Fullthrottle, yup, that's her.
I dropped her off at my LBS for a tune-up on the way home from BikeExpo. The sales rep assembled it at the show, and hadn't adjusted the derailleur or brakes, and I couldn't wait to get rid of those red tires! I'll remount them on their own rims for off-road use, but most of my riding is around town, so I'm putting on streets for now.
I made a couple calls to the left coast where there are several dealers who carry them and all reports were favourable. Of course the bike is too new for them to speak to reliability, but buyers there are happy so far. One Vancouver shop I spoke with has been working with Epik through development and filled me in on the company history. The motor design is there own, I'm told. Dr. Battery is partnered with Epik and brings some good tech to the table. Some details, such as the downtube battery mount, are nicer than the Bionx. The Bionx mount is stamped, unfinished steel, but Epik's is extruded and powder coated aluminum.The battery connectors are two bullet shaped studs as opposed to the Bionx which has a standard computer style multi pin jack built in. My Bionx had a bent flange on the jack when I picked it up from the shop, which I had to straighten with some needle nosed pliers. That can't happen with the DR. Battery design.
They call their batteries 'Lithium Imide' (TM), but they are basically Lithium Ion with Graphite replacing the Aluminum foil conductor. Dr. Battery is a subsidary of Leyden Power, who have been developing their own cell design for computers and other devices for several years. They claim increased duty life (up to 1600 charging cycles) and wider operating temperature range (-20f to 140f) as advantages to their formula. They also claim greater power to weight density, but I don't see how that could be possible by the substitution of graphite for aluminum. Maybe it has something to do with the shape of the cells which are elliptical as opposed to round cylinders?
Unlike the Bionx, Epik seems less proprietorial and more easily adaptable to other batteries, motors and controllers, should reliability become a problem.
I have only ridden one other mid drive, the Luxor, and the Epik feels quite a bit quicker and responsive. The Epik computer screen has one feature I really
appreciate and that is an easily resettable speed limiter. First thing I did was change it from 32k to 40k. She feels quick, but I really won't know until I get the gears working smoothly.
With two bikes, I'm looking forward to bringing friends on their first ebike rides, riding off road with the crankdrive and having a spare for when the Bionx is in the shop. I'll try to report back objectively with a comparison between these two fundamentally different designs once I get this d..n cast off my leg.
Last edited by magic carpet on Sep 11, 2012 8:21 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Epik Whistler

Post by magic carpet » Sep 11, 2012 8:00 am

Thanks Fullthrottle, yup, that's her.
I dropped her off at my LBS for a tune-up on the way home from BikeExpo. The sales rep assembled it at the show, and hadn't adjusted the derailleur or brakes, and I couldn't wait to get rid of those red tires! I'll remount them on their own rims for off-road use, but most of my riding is around town, so I'm putting on streets for now.
I made a couple calls to the left coast where there are several dealers who carry them and all reports were favourable. Of course the bike is too new for them to speak to reliability, but buyers there are happy so far. One Vancouver shop I spoke with has been working with Epik through development and filled me in on the company history. The motor design is there own, I'm told. Dr. Battery is partnered with Epik and brings some good tech to the table. Some details, such as the downtube battery mount, are nicer than the Bionx. The Bionx mount is stamped, unfinished steel, but Epik's is extruded and powder coated aluminum.The battery connectors are two bullet shaped studs as opposed to the Bionx which has a standard computer style multi pin jack built in. My Bionx had a bent flange on the jack when I picked it up from the shop, which I had to straighten with some needle nosed pliers. That can't happen with the DR. Battery design.
They call their batteries 'Lithium Imide' (TM), but they are basically Lithium Ion with Graphite replacing the Aluminum foil conductor. Dr. Battery is a subsidary of Leyden Power, who have been developing their own cell design for computers and other devices for several years. They claim increased duty life (up to 1600 charging cycles) and wider operating temperature range (-20f to 140f) as advantages to their formula. They also claim greater power to weight density, but I don't see how that could be possible by the substitution of graphite for aluminum. Maybe it has something to do with the shape of the cells which are elliptical as opposed to round cylinders?
Unlike the Bionx, Epik seems less proprietorial and more easily adaptable to other batteries, motors and controllers, should reliability become a problem.
I have only ridden one other mid drive, the Luxor, and the Epik feels quite a bit quicker and responsive. The Epik computer screen has one feature I really
appreciate and that is an easily resettable speed limiter. First thing I did was change it from 32k to 40k. She feels quick, but I really won't know until I get the gears working smoothly.
With two bikes, I'm looking forward to bringing friends on their first ebike rides, riding off road with the crankdrive and having a spare for when the Bionx is in the shop.
I'll try to provide a more objective comparison once I get this D..n cast off my leg.
Last edited by magic carpet on Sep 11, 2012 8:05 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Epik Whistler

Post by magic carpet » Sep 11, 2012 8:28 am

How do I delete redundant posts?

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Re: Epik Whistler

Post by grindz145 » Sep 11, 2012 3:49 pm

That's interesting, I thought optibike had a patent on the motorized bottom bracket. I like the concept.

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Re: Epik Whistler

Post by magic carpet » Sep 11, 2012 5:40 pm

The red tires are ghandi! Three bike shops later, I found some all black, Continentals for the street in 26x1.75 and ran home and installed them in 20 minutes. Couldn't do that with a hubmotor. One little speed sensor on the rear disc was the only electrical connection and the quick release spindles made it childs play. Well, as easy as changing wheels can be without a bikestand or centerstand. Picked up a water bottle cage to mount on the bosses on the underside of the down tube, but discovered they are utilized by the mounting bolts attaching the battery rack. Good design feature, allowing four bosses to attach the battery, as opposed to two with the Bionx. I'll pick up some longer bolts to extend through the down tube, and attach the bottle cage with nuts instead.
Spent two hundred bucks today on tires, tubes, mirror and bottle cage. Still need lights, saddle, fenders, rack and centerstand. Probably another three or four hundred dollars to get her the way I want her. That bargain price has grown substantially.

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Re: Epik Whistler

Post by magic carpet » Sep 11, 2012 6:06 pm

grindz145 wrote:That's interesting, I thought optibike had a patent on the motorized bottom bracket. I like the concept.
Don't think so grindz145, they're huge in Europe. Bosch make a nice one and there must be a dozen others.
The Bionx gives a better cycling workout (if you want one) and doesn't require constant shifting. You can start out in high if you want to. The Epik demands constant shifting to keep the motor in it's optimum speed range and feels more like a motorcycle.
Mike

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Re: Epik Whistler

Post by full-throttle » Sep 11, 2012 7:37 pm

grindz145 wrote:That's interesting, I thought optibike had a patent on the motorized bottom bracket. I like the concept.

It looks similar to Bofeili drive
viewtopic.php?f=28&t=26995

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Re: Epik Whistler

Post by magic carpet » Sep 12, 2012 12:58 pm

Very similar. My schematic shows a 'speed reduction system' in the stack of motor, controller and crank sprocket. I'm thinking the mechanism inside it's 'donut' exterior is planetary gearing. One difference is the packaging of the motor itself. The Epik motor is entirely cylindrical, and slips into a corresponding tube which is the bottom bracket. My thoughts were that it might accept other motors of the same (or less) outer diameter, but the motor seems to be specifically designed for this application and a replacement would require significant modifications.
Battery's charged, sun's out,see ya!

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Re: Epik Whistler

Post by magic carpet » Sep 13, 2012 7:43 am

I'm liking the Whistler very much. Having two ebikes is like having a Mistress, one get's all the attention, while the other sit's there. I'm feeling kinda guilty. The crank drive definitely adds an extra element to the ride, and demands a little more attention.
Yesterdays ride downtown was great! I picked up some lights and fenders and Greg, at Ezriders, the Pedego dealership, threw in a Pedego watch! Came back on the waterfront bike trail during rush hour, it was like riding in the peloton (if I was Lance Armstrong). The bikes bunch up at the red lights, and spread out when the signal changes. The fastest sprinters get a jump on me, but I soon sweep into the lead and catch the next green. See ya guys! And this with a cast on my leg!
Rain in the forecast for tomorrow, so today I'll ride again. But where to? I've done the main bike paths from end to end, so maybe I'll head to Toronto Island and test the stealthiness of the Bionx at the Ferry Terminal. There is a sign posted barring ebikes, but what they're looking for is escooters, not electrically assisted bicycles.
Time to get out there. Later eriders.
Mike
Last edited by magic carpet on Sep 14, 2012 8:04 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Epik Whistler

Post by richmpdx » Sep 13, 2012 12:40 pm

That is a great looking ebike, thanks for posting. It seems like it would be a really good opportunity for a Gates carbon drive and an alfine internal hub.

Can you comment on any noise generated by the bottom bracket motor? How does it compare to your other ebike?

I hope Epik exports this ebike to the US.

Rich

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Re: Epik Whistler

Post by magic carpet » Sep 14, 2012 12:53 am

Had a great ride to the Island today. Took the Bionx/Opus 'cause I had lot's of stuff to carry and haven't got a rack on the Whistler yet. Besides she was getting jealous of the Epik. On the Bionx/Opus, I throw my old motorcycle saddlebags over the rear rack, and have a handlebar/rack combo up front. Lunch, towel, tools, newspaper, jacket and six heinies is a pretty big load. Though not as fast as the Whistler, the Bionx is like a RollsRoyce in smoothness, silence and ease of operation. It has a thumb throttle in addition to pedelec, which is REALLY handy when you're wearing a cast on your foot. The Epik goes 8k faster, but you have to give 50% of the effort to the torque sensor, which means those last few kliks don't come without some cost. Having no throttle button requires maintaing a cadence in top gear for top speed. With the Bionx it's easier to cruise at the max of 32k, either pedalling or using the throttle button, or both, and is very effective in gusting headwinds and rolling hills. The Epik has a distinct hum to it, not loud or even unpleasent, sorta turbine like. The Bionx is TOTALLY silent! The Whistler would have been in it's element on the dirt paths and sandy beach today (when I get a rack), with it's suspension and fat tires. The Opus is a b...h in sand with thinnish tires and a full load onboard.
I'm finding one good reason for having two ebikes is so you can ride one in the morning and another in the afternoon. I drained the Bionx today by riding fast and heavy, but I had the Whistler to ride to the Chinese restaurant for dinner. Always ride white at night.
Mike

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Re: Epik Whistler

Post by magic carpet » Sep 14, 2012 1:40 am

richmpdx wrote:That is a great looking ebike, thanks for posting. It seems like it would be a really good opportunity for a Gates carbon drive and an alfine internal hub.

Can you comment on any noise generated by the bottom bracket motor? How does it compare to your other ebike?

I hope Epik exports this ebike to the US.

Rich

Hi Rich,
The schematic above shows an optional, belt drive front sprocket, so I guess it's designed for both a carbon belt and IGH, since I don't think derailleurs work with belts.
I mentioned above the slight whirr the motor makes, but it is barely noticeable. Although this set-up precludes regenerative braking, my Bionx doesn't really work too well for producing electricity either. Where the regen is really handy though, is long descents. It works like engine braking in a standard transmission car and saves using the brakes.
As far as importing to the U.S. of A. goes, I'm sure it's in their plans. I hope that means a 500 watt motor is on the way too!
Mike

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Re: Epik Whistler

Post by richmpdx » Sep 14, 2012 11:58 am

Mike,
Thanks for the response. The Bionix hubmotor is direct drive, correct? So it produces very little noise? The Whistler then would be somewhat louder? I don't suppose you have been on a bike with a geared hubmotor like the Ezee, BMC or MAC so that you could compare the sound of a geared hubmotor to the EPIK bottom-bracket motor? The sound might be quite similar as the EPIK probably uses a planetary reduction system much like the system in the geared hubmotors. Of course, using a mid-drive coupled to a derailleur allows the EPIK motor to stay in the highest efficiency rpm range.

I emailed EPIK and indeed, they are interested in sales to the US and apparently one could order direct from them. I am quite interested.

Rich

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Re: Epik Whistler

Post by oweee » Sep 14, 2012 1:36 pm

hey Mike just wondering what kind of range you get with that unit? Also do you think it would be easy to add a throttle to it. Where is the controller on the bike?
Thanks
O.

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Re: Epik Whistler

Post by magic carpet » Sep 14, 2012 3:24 pm

richmpdx wrote:Mike,
Thanks for the response. The Bionix hubmotor is direct drive, correct? So it produces very little noise? The Whistler then would be somewhat louder? I don't suppose you have been on a bike with a geared hubmotor like the Ezee, BMC or MAC so that you could compare the sound of a geared hubmotor to the EPIK bottom-bracket motor? The sound might be quite similar as the EPIK probably uses a planetary reduction system much like the system in the geared hubmotors. Of course, using a mid-drive coupled to a derailleur allows the EPIK motor to stay in the highest efficiency rpm range.

I emailed EPIK and indeed, they are interested in sales to the US and apparently one could order direct from them. I am quite interested.

Rich
Hi Rich, Ya the Bionx is direct drive and I can't hear it, at all, zero noise. I've ridden a couple of geared hubmotor production ebikes while I was shopping for the Bionx. The Pedego Interceptor and the Wisper. They were both quiet, but not silent. I'd say the sound was the equivalent of the Epik, but I don't trust either my hearing or memory well enough to be more objective than that. The wind noise is the loudest thing one hears on all of these bikes.
It's too early for me to recommend buying any type of ebike, but if the Whistler proves to be consistently reliable, and the folks I met at the trade show follow through on their promises of support, I think Epik could be quite successful. It's a well thought out design and is partnered with a leading battery manufacturer. Leyden make the batteries for the Brammo electric motorcycle, which did so well in the eclass at the prestigious, Isle of Man TT road race this year. I think if you're shopping for an ebike the best thing to do is ride as many bikes as you can. There are so many variations, they all feel totally different.
Due to the optimal weight distribution, the Whistler is the sportiest thing I've ridden so far.
Mike

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Re: Epik Whistler

Post by magic carpet » Sep 14, 2012 3:41 pm

oweee wrote:hey Mike just wondering what kind of range you get with that unit? Also do you think it would be easy to add a throttle to it. Where is the controller on the bike?
Thanks
O.
Hey O, give me another day or two and I'll let you know the exact range. I'm riding with an 'air boot' cast on my foot at the moment, so I've got the assist cranked up most of the time. My numbers will be low, and atypical of what I expect to get, once I have recovered from a fractured calcaneus. Still, it will show the low-end of the scale.
You can see where the controller is located in the schematic diagram in the third post. As far as adding a throttle goes, I'll have to ask Epik. If the system is already wired for it, it might be simple, but if the computer won't support it, it might require the skill of some of the experts here on ES.
Mike

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Re: Epik Whistler

Post by magic carpet » Sep 17, 2012 6:28 pm

Much as I'd like to keep the Epik, my sister seems to have appropriated it. She left me a text jokingly saying she'd heard I'd picked her up a new ebike. Since I'd rather see her on an ebike than her Yamaha 1100, and because her twin sister has an ebike, I took it over to her house last night to show it to her. She liked it a LOT and rode it up and down her street in the dark, the LED spoke lights flashing and the head and tail lights adding to the spectacle. After that, she asked if I could leave it with her to check it out in the daylight today. I don't think it will be coming home anytime soon. But that's okay, because I just came home from a thirty miler on the Opus/Bionx! The furthest I've ever gone and the most exercise I've had in four months. I kept the assistance on 3/4 and avoided the thumb throttle as much as possible. the last couple miles I reduced the assistance to half because I was down to about fifteen percent. But even still only one aero race bike passed me at the final traffic light drag race. Funny way cyclists wait at the lights on the bike path. The path is narrow, so people lean on the fences either side of the path, starting fifty feet back. When the light turns green, presumably, the slower riders are furthest back so no one needs to pass them. But anyone who feels fast is welcome to head to the front row to wait for the green. Just don't head to the front row, and then fizzle, or the humble, hangers back will zip by you, and you'll look like you have an inflated opinion of your cycling prowess. The Opus/Bionx can go to the front row, even with the rider in a cast and a cane on the rear carrier. Oh ya, a pair of old motorcycle panniers, full of stuff, a newspaper boys front basket, full fenders and centrestand, Iphone with extension speakers mounted on the bars next to a pair of waterbottles and no lycra, whatsoever. I love my bike!

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Re: Epik Whistler

Post by WASYLBRYTAN » Jan 22, 2013 11:53 pm

magic carpet wrote:Very similar. My schematic shows a 'speed reduction system' in the stack of motor, controller and crank sprocket. I'm thinking the mechanism inside it's 'donut' exterior is planetary gearing. One difference is the packaging of the motor itself. The Epik motor is entirely cylindrical, and slips into a corresponding tube which is the bottom bracket. My thoughts were that it might accept other motors of the same (or less) outer diameter, but the motor seems to be specifically designed for this application and a replacement would require significant modifications.
Battery's charged, sun's out,see ya!
I share your enthusiasm for this amazing bicycle. I accidently discovered a Whistler specially outfitted showbike sitting in a store, never used, and with a very attractive price. It had an adjustable stem, fenders, comfort saddle and sold for fully one third less money than the standard price. Though I already own an IGO URBAN which just happens to be in the shop for warranty repairs, I could not resist buying this one and decided to give the IGO to one of my sons. I just ran it at 40 km per hour for 30 kilometres before the battery was so low I decided to go home before it died completely. At saner speeds and lower assist levels, I am told I can expect about 130 kilometres from a battery charge; this was told to me by someone who commuted with one for nearly a year under real world conditions. By comparison, my IGO, which is the same as the Tonaro Compy, will only do 27 km per hour max and is five pounds heavier than the Whistler. The Whistler is very powerful and does not make much noise; there is kind of a mild rubbing sound whenever the motor is engaged. If this bike proves reliable over the long term it is destined to become a classic. It is as good as the high end European E-Bikes and only costs about half as much.

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Re: Epik Whistler

Post by WASYLBRYTAN » Jan 24, 2013 8:11 pm

oweee wrote:hey Mike just wondering what kind of range you get with that unit? Also do you think it would be easy to add a throttle to it. Where is the controller on the bike?
Thanks
O.
I have had my Epik Whistler for 5 days and have 306 kilometres on it. At level 5 and maximum speed I was able to get 30 km. without draining the battery completely. At level 3 and an average speed of 22 kph I was able to get 87 kilometres. Just for comparison, I average about 16 kph when I pedal my recumbent manually over the same course. So .07 cents worth of electricity will enable me to bike anywhere at 35% faster speeds. A good deal in my book. I will do more testing when the rain stops but I definitely think these are outstanding results from a relatively small 8.8 AH CAPACITY battery. This is a wonderful bike but I regret not being able to ride it enough because this is the rainy season and the middle of winter here on the west coast of Canada. I was told by the daughter of the inventor of this motor that a throttle accessory will be offered within the coming months.

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Re: Epik Whistler

Post by WASYLBRYTAN » Jan 31, 2013 12:18 am

full-throttle wrote:Is this it?
Image
Image
http://epikbike.com/whistler.aspx
Technical Specs
Max Motor Speed: 	32km/h (as limited by controller)
Speed Range:            Up to 45 km (varies with terrain and pedaling)
Battery:                Lithium rechargeable, 37V, 8.8 Ah
Weight:                 21 kg (2.5 kg is battery weight)
Frame: 	                Al alloy, high quality MTB frame (18" frame)
Tires: 	                26" x 1.95" Kenda, 26x1.95 K857
Wheels/Spokes:          High quality double walled rims, stainless steel spokes
Brakes- Front: 	        Tektro AURIGA COMP Hydraulic Disc Brake
Brakes- Rear: 	        Tektro AURIGA COMP Hydraulic Disc Brake
Gears: 	                Shimano Alivio 8 speeds
Front Fork: 	        SR Suntour XCT, 80mm Travel Suspension front fork
Handlebars: 	        Al alloy - Flat bar
Chainwheel: 	        EPIK chainring, 42T
Chain: 	                KMC Chain
Saddle:                 Velo Saddle
Grips: 	                Velo Ergonomic Grips
Stand: 	                Alloy Side kickstand
Motor Type: 	        Brushless DC Motor, 36V
Output Power: 	        350 W
Control Panel: 	        led 790 / J-lcd
Assistance Mode: 	Low / Med / High
Rear Cassette: 	        Shimano 8 Speeds Cassette 11/32T
Rear Derailluer: 	Shimano ALivio 8 Speeds Derailleur
Total Width: 	        600 mm (or less)
Wheel Base: 	        1100 mm

I don't know whether there is anyone reading this thread because it is quite old but I would like to give my latest report on the best bike I have ever had. I have owned it 12 days today and have ridden it 906 kilometres very smoothly without any problems. I just think it could use a little higher capacity battery because I find myself having to charge it twice a day which reduces my riding time severely. That is why I have so little mileage on it. There are only so many hours in the day. It just seems to feel better the more I use it. If this bike remains as bulletproof as it has been so far it is destined to become a legend. I can only dream of a higher capacity battery.

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gestalt
10 kW
10 kW
Posts: 878
Joined: Oct 19, 2009 10:55 pm
Location: Boston, MA

Re: Epik Whistler

Post by gestalt » Jan 31, 2013 12:57 am

with all that room in the triangle and the mounts for the existing battery it doesn't seem like it would be that hard to replace it with something much larger. or you could use something as simple as the falcon ev bag and a off the shelf battery/charger combo.
- be seeing you
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