Search found 3544 matches: mxus 3000

Searched query: +mxus +3000

by molybdenum
Dec 07, 2017 11:59 pm
Forum: E-Bike General Discussion
Topic: Winter Projects ... ?
Replies: 14
Views: 411

Re: Winter Projects ... ?

Last week, the ice fog hit in earnest and I awake every morning to a city wide skating rink. At the moment, my Kona hybrid with Q135 is my only ride, so I ordered a set of spiky tires from crc to get me through till I come up with a better solution.
Winter tires.jpg
Winter tires.jpg (209.61 KiB) Viewed 88 times
I would have ordered the premium Schwalbe Marathon ones but they are out of stock in my size. I might try my hands at making these in a 2.5" knobby but it would be unfeasible in a 35c tire and 2.5" won't fit nor suit the bike. btw @DrkAngel, I really like your "hedgehog" model.

This is a temporary fix of course, and I'm planning to put together a winter beast:
Suspension frame.
Mxus 3000 motor to power through deeper snow.
66V battery, removable for indoor storage and charging.
12 fet 50A controller.
Mudflaps.

Most of the stuff I have lying around unused right now, save the frame which I'll be hunting for in the coming weeks.
by markz
Dec 04, 2017 3:44 pm
Forum: E-Bike Non-hub Motor Drives
Topic: new cyclone 3000 w mid-drive kit?
Replies: 2782
Views: 190110

Re: new cyclone 3000 w mid-drive kit?

Current voltage is 52-61V range 15S is too fast (on my 4T mxus 3kw), and it eats wh/km on high throttle. Resoldering pack to 42V 10S will give me 50% more range and slow me down :twisted:
by lionelt
Nov 21, 2017 7:24 am
Forum: E-Bike General Discussion
Topic: First build - Vector light frame, mxus v3 and adaptto
Replies: 33
Views: 1388

Re: First build - Vector light frame, mxus v3 and adaptto

rumme wrote:
Oct 30, 2017 1:37 pm
My motor is rated for 3k but I often pump 5k- 5.5k thru it and it handles it fine , but mine has ferro fluid in it. I'm running 72 volts and a lyen controller in sensorless mode, along with tubeless moto tires. This is my 4th ebike and easily my favorite , best performing.
Hi how is the motor mxus 3000 in sensor less mode?
Coggins?

How do you setup lyen controller in this mode (sensorless) ?
Thx
by markz
Nov 15, 2017 4:13 pm
Forum: E-Bike Non-hub Motor Drives
Topic: new cyclone 3000 w mid-drive kit?
Replies: 2782
Views: 190110

Re: new cyclone 3000 w mid-drive kit?

:!: Yup I took it off, and yup I am too lazy to take off the brackets and install bottom bracket and crankset. Just redid the battery pack, from 6Ah 72V to 12Ah 60V. Hopefully can obtain decent mileage :!:
Cyclone off the bike.jpg
Never did hook up both motor controllers to a single throttle. Would have been interesting. Main concern now is selling the C4K locally and fixing all the geared and dd motors I currently have. That is the mxus 3k, battery is hidden on the cabinet side. 60V hksuniwn cont, crystalyte 26" dh rim, and yes a 7 speed freewheel.
by Burnt75
Nov 13, 2017 12:12 pm
Forum: E-Bike General Discussion
Topic: Motor Wattage VS Battery Drain
Replies: 23
Views: 525

Re: Motor Wattage VS Battery Drain

markz wrote:
Burnt75 wrote:Thanks Dogman. Most helpful. Trying to decide between 3000 or 5000 motor. Would like mostly to ride about 25 to 35 mph with some fun run of about 45mph.
40kph-55kph-72kph.
http://www.ebikes.ca/tools/simulator.ht ... i&mass=110

Buy the MXUS 3000W V2 or V3 they are both excellent choices. Get the 3T and lace it into a 17" motorcycle rim, with Shinko 244 tire. Install suitable battery which will be 20S 72V(nominal) 84V(max) for your 45mph requirement. The smaller wheel diameter allows you to keep everything cooler. Take a look at the motor simulator, fits your needs perfectly.

This is with a 5% grade added, and you are still flying fast, over heat in 39 minutes, at 62kph which is like 38mph.
http://www.ebikes.ca/tools/simulator.ht ... 10&grade=5

Controller - If you want to save money, buy the ebay seller hksunwin he sells 72V 1000W on up are all the same, there is no difference between them.
https://www.ebay.com/sch/m.html?_odkw=4 ... V&_sacat=0

Where to buy your battery and torque arms - http://www.ebikes.ca

Was looking at that motor. Qulbix 140 recommended a 19 inch wheel. Thanks for info.
by markz
Nov 12, 2017 8:24 pm
Forum: E-Bike General Discussion
Topic: Motor Wattage VS Battery Drain
Replies: 23
Views: 525

Re: Motor Wattage VS Battery Drain

Burnt75 wrote:Thanks Dogman. Most helpful. Trying to decide between 3000 or 5000 motor. Would like mostly to ride about 25 to 35 mph with some fun run of about 45mph.
40kph-55kph-72kph.
http://www.ebikes.ca/tools/simulator.ht ... i&mass=110

Buy the MXUS 3000W V2 or V3 they are both excellent choices. Get the 3T and lace it into a 17" motorcycle rim, with Shinko 244 tire. Install suitable battery which will be 20S 72V(nominal) 84V(max) for your 45mph requirement. The smaller wheel diameter allows you to keep everything cooler. Take a look at the motor simulator, fits your needs perfectly.

This is with a 5% grade added, and you are still flying fast, over heat in 39 minutes, at 62kph which is like 38mph.
http://www.ebikes.ca/tools/simulator.ht ... 10&grade=5

Controller - If you want to save money, buy the ebay seller hksunwin he sells 72V 1000W on up are all the same, there is no difference between them.
https://www.ebay.com/sch/m.html?_odkw=4 ... V&_sacat=0

Where to buy your battery and torque arms - www.ebikes.ca
by markz
Nov 11, 2017 4:28 pm
Forum: E-Bike Non-hub Motor Drives
Topic: new cyclone 3000 w mid-drive kit?
Replies: 2782
Views: 190110

Re: new cyclone 3000 w mid-drive kit?

Somehow broke my half twist throttle ignition, sensor wire and ground shows 0V. Connected up spare throttle (with no dmm) and still nothing, checked spare throttle on hksunwin controller with mxus 3k, dmm shows everything normal, yet that throttle does not work, might be ignition but its connected. Only thing to do is hook up Cyclone again, test spare throttle with dmm and order a few spare throttles.
by mpmoller
Oct 30, 2017 5:03 pm
Forum: E-Bike General Discussion
Topic: First build - Vector light frame, mxus v3 and adaptto
Replies: 33
Views: 1388

Re: First build - Vector light frame, mxus v3 and adaptto

rumme wrote:
ebiker1.jpg

nice ebike...

Ive got about $3000 in mine ...using a 19" rear and 21" front rim.


My motor is rated for 3k but I often pump 5k- 5.5k thru it and it handles it fine , but mine has ferro fluid in it. I'm running 72 volts and a lyen controller in sensorless mode, along with tubeless moto tires. This is my 4th ebike and easily my favorite , best performing.
Damn what a bike! What is the topspeed? I just charged my bike for the first time this evening. First ride - 60km/h. Prette happy about that. It still need some finetuning and a backbreak. Temp is working fine and my motor didnt get hot at all. I got the hubsink on it. I also saw the police - without any lights on. frock. They didnt see me, luckily! :D
by Allex
Oct 30, 2017 3:18 pm
Forum: E-Bike Technical
Topic: Definitive Tests on the Heating and Cooling of Hub Motors
Replies: 1918
Views: 237917

Re: Definitive Tests on the Heating and Cooling of Hub Motor

Meanwhile in Russia, they take another way to cool down the motors.
It seems that ferrofluid is not enough for them so they actually use Active cooling and it is far more complex one.

The original creator "Chupa"
http://electrotransport.ru/ussr/index.p ... le;u=20897
Came up with the idea to use double-fans for servers, not any fans but a very specific type that has a very high pressure and sealed bearings for long life. At the air intake they install Airfilter.
Image

Image

This creation is for a MAC 9T motor. He runs a MAC setup and pumping it with over 6kW(8kW peak) with a kelly 72121 The motor never reach above 75C at 75km/h And I've seen about 80km/h in the below video, thats insane on a Mac(it does of course have modified gears)

Image

Image

Image



Image

Image

They use this with MXUS 3000 motors as well, and at 15kW peaks it never overheats.


And here is a run on with the mac ,you can see the speed on the right side of handlebar, temp is on the stem, showing a maximum of 70C at about 75km/h jump to 28:50
by rumme
Oct 30, 2017 1:37 pm
Forum: E-Bike General Discussion
Topic: First build - Vector light frame, mxus v3 and adaptto
Replies: 33
Views: 1388

Re: First build - Vector light frame, mxus v3 and adaptto

ebiker1.jpg

nice ebike...

Ive got about $3000 in mine ...using a 19" rear and 21" front rim.

My motor is rated for 3k but I often pump 5k- 5.5k thru it and it handles it fine , but mine has ferro fluid in it. I'm running 72 volts and a lyen controller in sensorless mode, along with tubeless moto tires. This is my 4th ebike and easily my favorite , best performing.
by SprocketLocket
Oct 26, 2017 7:04 am
Forum: E-Bike General Discussion
Topic: Frame candidate, Mongoose Terrex, hardtail 27.5 X 2.8
Replies: 26
Views: 4249

Re: Frame candidate, Mongoose Terrex, hardtail 27.5 X 2.8

Thanks for the great info, bullfrog.
I know and agree with pretty much everything you said. I get criticized for being too long-winded, but then when I simplify/shorten things, I then get "corrected", lol.

EM3EV does not carry any 26er rims between 32 and 80 mm. At least, they didn't when I bought. I'd be gleeful if I were wrong now, but I don't think I am. It's just a huge gap. Before Paul sold fatbike kits, and then while he was preparing, I encouraged him to choose 50mm as the fatbike rim, if not something in the 60-ish range, for fatbikes, not 80mm. Or, I said, if you carry 80, please carry something between 32 and 80. You can see that already, I was looking towards Plus bikes, which were so nascent they didn't even have an agreed-on name. I tried to tell him that the 50-ish/60-ish rims are much more versatile, and that there were "fat" tires less than 4-inches. "Mid-fat" was a term I'd heard, and I don't think I'd heard the term "Plus" used yet. People usually called them "fat" (there was less distinction than now). And indeed, fatbikes rims did indeed start in the 40mm range (44mm SnoCat was 1st commercially available fat rim), and even a Large Marge is in the 60s (65 to be exact). IMO, for most fatbikes, 80mm is not necessary, and indeed a hindrance, unless there is a fashion statement to be made, or people feel they need the back to look like the front, but I think of ebikers as more nonconformists.If you want to go 4.8 or 5 yeah you'll want 80mm, but those are fairly rare, and were almost unknown at the time, and most LBS's didn't even have a single vanilla fatbike in stock. Paul didn't go with my advice, obviously. It was not easy, because the 36-spoke was not used much on wide-tire bikes, so there was/is a very limited rim selection (hence the reason I put out the call in my last question in previous post). I'm not entirely sure of Paul's thought process, but I know he wanted a strong rim, prefers to buy from AlexRims due to a known quality/strength/price combination, and IIRC, AlexRims didn't make something in that (~50mm) size at the time--and I am still not sure if they do (their website sometimes makes deciphering inner widths difficult). They did make an 80mm Blizzerk in 36 spokes, and that's what he went with. Paul told me it was strong, and he was right. It would be easy for tubeless, as there are NO weight-saving cut-outs in mine. Full-fat wheelsets are ridiculously heavy, even before you add liners and/or sealant to prevent flats. I want some width, but the height, width, and rotational weight of 4-inch tires is more than I need or want. I don't know how pedalers ride these things without assistance. If I run my tires at the comfy low pressure pedalists claim they normally do, my controller gets pretty warm just casually riding around, flat, and my voltage goes down strikingly faster. If I pump up the pressure, it's basically room temperature doing the same, showing me how much more energy low-pressure riding takes, even further baffling me how these fatbike pedalers do it!

I just spent some time re-aquainting myself with AlexRims.com. It does look like AlexRims now makes 40-something mm rims, but ONLY in sizes taller than 26er--which really suxxx!! I couldn't find anything 40-ish for 26 (I'm hoping someone will contradict me). In 26, you can get 32, 34, and 35 (a lot of choices in a small range)--and then--nothing, until 70mm! So there is still this huge gap that I've been talking about. What, we need a hundred choices between 17 and 25 mm, yet we have to literally "double it" to go to the next step from 35? This is, honestly, why I asked for advice.

So, while I'm glad to see anything less than 80mm, I really don't get why AlexRims would do 70mm (so close). And not something more between 32 and 80, which was their gap when I bought (which was even worse, but not much worse). The average between 32 and 80 is 56, BTW, i'm just sayin'.

It's really maddening, b/c they make 40, 45, and 50 mm rims, but NONE for 26ers. Why can I get a 50mm rim in 27, 29, and even *24* inches, but not 26?! Why can I get a 40mm rim in 24-inch and even TWENTY inch--but not twenty-six?

Some of AlexRims naming baffles me. For instance, "Supra35"-- its specs say 559x30mm. So why not "Supra30"? Yet, DX32 is actually 32mm ID. XM35 is 35mm. You would think the Volar 3.0 would be for a 3.0-inch tire, right? No, it's 30mm. The SX44 is--you guessed it--20mm.

Update: hey now, what's this. Okay, more naming weirdness:
Specs on the "Blizzerk 80" are 559x73.
Spec on the "Blizzerk 70" is 559x64. Huh?
So, the "Blizzerk 70" (64 actual) is basically equivalent to a Large Marge (65).
Okay, so 35-65 is their (AlexRims') gap now. That's still a huge gap.

35 could do, though. You could run standard MTB, up to 3.0. I don't think I'd feel comfortable running my 3.5" Sunlite Speedster on crushed rock/unpaved roads though--- or am I being overly cautious?


For Newbies:
Regarding the rear spacing of the Terrex as Bullfrog noted.
A lot of newbies doing research may think of buying what they think is a 'standard' mountain bike (if there is such a thing), not realizing that the spacing may not be matching axle shoulders of the motor they got. As far as I'm concerned, WesNewell is the expert on getting motors to fit into frames they aren't sized-for, so I would point to his posts for newbies who may have gotten into a... jam (not jam nut). 148mm should be the new 'Boost' spacing... whether Terrex really fully follows the Boost standard, or is just 148mm, or whether that even matters, I don't know. How doable it would be for mechanically-wary people to fit it onto a 135mm motor, I don't know. Some cheap Plus bikes are using 155mm rear spacing; I really haven't heard of this elsewhere. Also funky bottom bracket sizes. You'd think it'd be cheaper to just stick with established tooling. I don't know what is up.


After doing some research, I am here on it:
These 2 videos pretty much de-convinced me to keep researching in this direction (right or wrong):
Huffy fortress
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_fcNixfU-c
Mongoose
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5S78kVm7RtY

And this one made me realize something and decide that I, personally, will probably never buy a bike with rim brakes.
I do hear that rim brakes actually perform better on the cheapest bikes than the ones with disk brakes--issues like the disk bending the fork to the left, causing self-steer; rotors out of true, difficulty adjusting, etc. However. The risk of overheating (or other malf's, like pad rubbing on tire) to total failure is much much lower.
Will a Walmart Huffy survive a Downhill Mountain Bike Trail? | Skills with Phil
Watch out, it's about an 8 on a 10-scale pucker factor:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkMnk_e ... KzvgUy0zGW
You may say, "He rode that bike in conditions it wasn't designed for". Yeah, but what are we doing with ebikes?! Being able to go 30 is pretty dommon outside of entry-level, torque-oriented, and socialism-marxism-fascism-leftism-authoritarianism-loving, lawfully-castrated eURO-bikes. The increased range and increase in sustainable speed gives us the ability to access places we couldn't before, including areas where we might have sustained downhill. The cheap rim-brake bikes are clearly not up to sustained downhill, especially on the original pads. The FIRST upgrade you should, no MUST do as an e-biker, in my non-expert but researched opinion, is get quality 3rd-party replacement pads. I hear it will also help on that horrible noise. This bike isn't alone on this. They all do it. Here is WesNewell's Fortress. Wes if you read this, respect. Just linking as an example of the sound, which, in fairness, you said in the video you were planning on getting better pads too. [Note: actual pics of the bike is at the very end.]
MXUS 3000 on Huffy Fortress 3.0 24s lipo
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w97n4ig8254

A Mongoose Ledge dual suspension fares better in the first videos here. But only after a complete rebuild of the bike. This shows me that whoever is buying these bikes, should basically have full-fledged bike mechanic skills (and the patience required to do so), or be having sex with someone who does. The sad thing is, most people buying bikes like these, and who I think the bikes are really aimed at from a marketing standpoint, are at the opposite end of the spectrum.
Cheap Bikes & Torture Tests [playlist]
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=P ... d5L7BsyLRF
This video series also caps my thoughts on entry-level "MTBs": IF you fully tune/re-tune them/maintain them, and IF you keep your riding LIGHT DUTY, AND with a little luck, you'll probably be okay. One thing I don't think anyone will dispute me on, is that (aside from the frame itself), if you test the limits, the components (including critical components) are much easier to damage or break completely, than a higher-quality bike. Basically, the threshold is crossed sooner. And it will almost certainly take more maintenance along the way.

One of the most interesting videos is of bike tires being completely filled with WATER, and ridden, to see how much heavy wheels really affect performance.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vq7fF0_ ... d5L7BsyLRF
A really interesting thing is, once he was going, things actually felt pretty normal. It was stopping, starting, and trying tricks that needed lots of effort. That seems to match my observation that my fatbike's battery goes down noticeably faster with more starts and stops, no matter how gently I try. I was still amazed at some of the tricks he could still do with water-filled tires.

The final video is '$149 WalMart Enduro bike', or something like that. I want to share my main pick-up there too. 2 trail-biking enthusiasts took a trip to remote & rough Pigsah Nat'l Forest bike trails, and for whatever reason, instead of bringing their good bikes, they bought $150 bikes at the local Wal-Mart. The INTERESTING thing is, they both bought the SAME model [Genesis brand, dual-susp, front disk, threadless steerer]. While they both made the trip together, the cameraman rode faster & harder, just going for it. The buddy tended to lag behind, not pushing the bike as hard. Interestingly, by the end of the trail, the cameraman's bike was completely ruined in multiple ways, while the lag-behind buddy's bike was actually still completely operable! Actually with nothing broken. Same bike model, same assembly line, same trail. This is really interesting, because it nearly pinpoints a fine line between "it's fine", and "total disaster", including very real safety risks (especially since there was no cellphone service, nor emergency vehicle access, on the park's trails). I realized that, by definition, all ebikers are pushing their bikes harder than normal riders. But some people are riding fairly gently, with medium power, on good pavement. WesNewell's suburban riding videos come to mind. But when you're often riding on farm roads, crushed rock, jarring dilapidated pavement, and the occasional bumpy field, like me, things change. I'm reminded of why I bought a front-suspension fatbike in the first place, not that I really knew what I was doing (and I knew that). And for trail riding, well, clearly, all bets are off.

While this is long, I don't post often either, so I put a lot into each post. I hate to say this, but this spate of research has made me appreciate B*kesD*rect bikes more. As much as I dislike the company's marketing strategies, the sales/support staff who are completely inaccessible by phone and randomly blow you off by email, I even dislike the website.. what I <i>can</i> say is, the bikes are solid compared to these entry-level big box bikes, and most importantly, generally not a danger to you as a person--where that certainly cannot be said for far too many of these big box bikes, especially how they're delivered. I'm surprised a class-action lawsuit hasn't arisen yet. Some of the QC stories of these Chinese bikes are just egregious. And it should remind us to always resist socialism/marxism; whatever's going on over there-you don't want it here.

In the '$149 WalMart Enduro bike' Pigsah Nat'l Forest video, this line pretty much summed it up, regarding one bike being completely destroyed, and the other completely fine:
"...it was clear that speed was the major disruptive force on these bikes".
Obviously, he means how hard it's ridden, and in his case, going faster meant more stresses on the bike. And the stresses weren't coming really from the speed itself, but the impacts; however the speed made it worse. It's kind of how comedian Ron White said, 'in a hurricane, it's not the wind that kills ya. It's the stuff IN the wind.' But--speed makes it worse. And speed is what "e" gives us. Range, too. We're going farther, which means more variety of terrain. More uh-ohs, "oh shit" moments, and hitting them harder. I remember I spent the (to me) crazy cash on my bike with bleeding edge features for perceived safety improvements. Buying an entry-level big box Plus bike just for the tires, and tubes, and lace-able rims is tempting, I'll admit--with a frame left over for maybe a 2nd build/to experiment with. I thought I'd probably upgrade the fork and handlebars. But after watching the video, I see now that most of the cheapos have scarily fragile handlebars and quill stemps/headsets--not more-confident threadless steerers. I didn't even know what any of this crap was when I started considering ebikes!

So now, yeah--if I actually thought I might do a conversion to an entry-level BBB [big box bike--there is a forum called bigboxbikes.com, actually], my minimum standard would be disk brakes and threadless headset... which will disqualify LOTS of models. Oh well, probably for the best. Originally, I thought: replacement handlebars are super-cheap (and they are). An ok budget suspension tube ain't much, either. And yeah, the bottom brackets are weak, but I won't pedal much. But then I see that the hubs are also fragile (and definitely need checking/adjusting before riding--beyond most rider's skill level). Okay, the rear 'hub' will actually be the hub motor. Still leaves the front hub (not as big of a deal IMO). Even if just left with the frame, you're still stuck with the overly-weak headset--yikes. Hm.

Also in fairness, in the 'Cheap Bikes & Torture Tests' playlist, the author reviews a Mongoose Dolomite, which broke the Big Box trend by using fairly standard, simple, and durable components--albeit with an inexplicably high-toothed front sprocket. What I drew from this was, a budget mfr can make a reliable, "dare I say, 'safe?'" [quote from the video] cheap bike if they want to, if they keep the gimmicks low, and focus on simplicity and reliability [ridiculous 100mm-rim fat tire gimmick aside].

And, interestingly, WesNewell owns 3 of the 5 bikes reviewed in the above videos. No disrespect, Wes! LOL. Wes was actually important to me and the start of my e-biking. Of all the prominent members here, he was the actually first ebiker I actually zoomed in on. It was due to his signature at the time. He had one bike, and included basically his whole recipe in his signature, which gave me my first real starting point. I really hadn't found full 'recipes' anywhere else. And, like most of us when we're first getting into this, and experiencing 'sticker shock', his 'recipe' was budget-oriented, so less of an initial turn-off, which may have kept me in the game. I strongly considered his recipe, but ultimately began modeling off Neptronix 'recipes', as I began to talk myself into spending 'beaucoup bucks'.

It was, however, almost immediately clear to me that, despite WesNewell's budget approach, he'd forgotten more about bikes than I ever knew. He had enough spare parts from upgrades to build a spare bike, and the knowhow to do it. Whereas, I didn't own a bike. At all, much less spare parts. Nevermind the knowhow. So I somewhat blindly spent more on a bike, somewhat compensating knowledge for money. Now that I know bikes better, the more I researched low-end mountain bikes, the more I began to appreciate mine. It really is a solid bike. And if I didn't have to have the fancy suspension, I could've gotten something just as good, maybe even better-suited for me, for less than half the price, or a few hundred dollars. But that's still 2-4 times more. And while I'll won't controversially say 2-4 times better, I will entertain maybe "2-4 time safer", or likelihood of something going dangerously wrong.

I know there will be newbies doing research, finding this thread doing websearches/all-night research, like I think we've all done on multiple occasions. This was long, but after having gone from zero to actually having some wherewithall, I try to give back with hopefully-accurate, well-reasoned POV's, after being helped so much by others who did the same before me.
by wesnewell
Oct 24, 2017 11:30 pm
Forum: E-Bike General Discussion
Topic: Frame candidate, Mongoose Terrex, hardtail 27.5 X 2.8
Replies: 26
Views: 4249

Re: Frame candidate, Mongoose Terrex, hardtail 27.5 X 2.8

I know nothing about the Terrex other than what's on the ad. My choice was the Huffy Fortress 3.0 with a standard width mxus 3000 motor. Info on that bike is here;
https://endless-sphere.com/forums/viewt ... s#p1182072
by Rix
Oct 16, 2017 10:38 am
Forum: E-Bike Photos & Video
Topic: Stealth FUTR owners builds and pics
Replies: 1885
Views: 54965

Re: Stealth FUTR owners builds and pics

Allex wrote:Yes, for 140 or more Amps it is recommended to use 14p. But now we are talking about a really heavy battery and a quite expensive one too.
Lilke icherouveim said, it is very personal, and something almost impossible to get it perfect with the first build, because you have no idea on how you will ride, feel and how you want your bike in the end.
For me, it was a downgrading path to get the best power/weight ratio. Like most beginners, I started with a big frame, heavy motor and a big battery, but I realised very soon that the riding I am doing, I am much better of with a lighter motor/frame and battery.
So having 20s14p, mxus 3000 and max-e I went to 18s6p midi-e and leaf 1500W motor, lightweight rims, lightweight tyres, double crown fork to single crown and so on. For me, this new bike is much more fun, again, with my kind of riding style.

Cricket, if you are in Sthlm, you should try it out.
This is so true. I have came to the same conclusions. What I have also found is about 7kw is the sweet spot for most ebikes that weighs less than 100 pounds with good suspension and can be pedaled. This is the direction my future builds will be going. We are still talking about electric bicycles and not electric motorcycles.
by Allex
Oct 16, 2017 2:46 am
Forum: E-Bike Photos & Video
Topic: Stealth FUTR owners builds and pics
Replies: 1885
Views: 54965

Re: Stealth FUTR owners builds and pics

Yes, for 140 or more Amps it is recommended to use 14p. But now we are talking about a really heavy battery and a quite expensive one too.
Lilke icherouveim said, it is very personal, and something almost impossible to get it perfect with the first build, because you have no idea on how you will ride, feel and how you want your bike in the end.
For me, it was a downgrading path to get the best power/weight ratio. Like most beginners, I started with a big frame, heavy motor and a big battery, but I realised very soon that the riding I am doing, I am much better of with a lighter motor/frame and battery.
So having 20s14p, mxus 3000 and max-e I went to 18s6p midi-e and leaf 1500W motor, lightweight rims, lightweight tyres, double crown fork to single crown and so on. For me, this new bike is much more fun, again, with my kind of riding style.

Cricket, if you are in Sthlm, you should try it out.
by gman1971
Oct 06, 2017 6:53 pm
Forum: E-Bike Non-hub Motor Drives
Topic: new cyclone 3000 w mid-drive kit?
Replies: 2782
Views: 190110

Re: new cyclone 3000 w mid-drive kit?

markz wrote:OK well I went about 6km (which seemed shorter) on my mxus 3kw from a top charge of 60.50V and the LVC was set at 52V on a 4T winding, heavy motor compared to your 9C. I charged the battery up again, and did the exact same trip, keeping an eye on the voltage as the LVC set on my Cyclone 4kw is set to 32V. There was virtually no difference, other then a steel mtb bike with 2 extra frame bar for battery and the Townie which is alum feet forward design.
Townie with Cyclone 4KW at 60.5V.jpg
MTB ebike frame all steel 60.5V.jpg
My assumptions before were off, saying that the C4K was taking more juice. With the test run I just had, the Cyclone 4kw went about 400 meters more and it had more headwind. Exact same ride on both, with the exact same break time on the two stops.

When I double up the battery I will do another test, but climbing a particular steep hill.

Good info, thanks.
by markz
Oct 06, 2017 6:38 pm
Forum: E-Bike Non-hub Motor Drives
Topic: new cyclone 3000 w mid-drive kit?
Replies: 2782
Views: 190110

Re: new cyclone 3000 w mid-drive kit?

OK well I went about 6km (which seemed shorter) on my mxus 3kw from a top charge of 60.50V and the LVC was set at 52V on a 4T winding, heavy motor compared to your 9C. I charged the battery up again, and did the exact same trip, keeping an eye on the voltage as the LVC set on my Cyclone 4kw is set to 32V. There was virtually no difference, other then a steel mtb bike with 2 extra frame bar for battery and the Townie which is alum feet forward design.
Townie with Cyclone 4KW at 60.5V.jpg
MTB ebike frame all steel 60.5V.jpg
My assumptions before were off, saying that the C4K was taking more juice. With the test run I just had, the Cyclone 4kw went about 400 meters more and it had more headwind. Exact same ride on both, with the exact same break time on the two stops.

When I double up the battery I will do another test, but climbing a particular steep hill.
by markz
Sep 15, 2017 2:12 pm
Forum: E-Bike Non-hub Motor Drives
Topic: new cyclone 3000 w mid-drive kit?
Replies: 2782
Views: 190110

Re: new cyclone 3000 w mid-drive kit?

Chalo wrote:Testing them after repairs, I was struck by how noisy they are compared to any other electric bike motors I've used. It's not an objectionable sound, but it's loud. And it doesn't sound like gear noise either-- it's electrical.
I agree, they are loud and people hear you coming up from behind (a long ways) them on the pathways. I am not wholly convinced that cyclone mid drive is good for my needs. Compared to say a high powered direct drive motor in a small diameter wheel. I'd really have to do a proper test on this one short section of 12% grade that is the most I'd conquer on a casual ride. I do hate hills and understand the user nick name Hillhater.

One day I will lace the mxus 3k in my 16" moto rim and compare it to c4k.
by wesnewell
Sep 10, 2017 1:21 pm
Forum: E-Bike General Discussion
Topic: Target: 35Mph, Trek 820 Frame, 36 OR 72V. What would YOU do?
Replies: 26
Views: 1401

Re: Target: 35Mph, Trek 820 Frame, 36 OR 72V. What would YOU

I run my 48V 1000W motor on 88.8V/100.8V charged without a problem. The kit controller is probably limited to 63V max, so you'll need a new 72V 40A controller. Shouldn't be a problem unless you ride long distances at 35mph or try go up steep hills at max throttle. At 72V it will probably max out at ~40mph or a little more depending on weight. If you want to be absolutely safe I'd go for a mxus 3000 4T with 72V controller. It'll run 40mph all day long. The 48V 1000W mor will run continuous at 30 mph or a little more all day long.
by liveforphysics
Sep 09, 2017 2:50 am
Forum: Motor Technology
Topic: Optimal Hub Motor design? Break down of BionX D-Series
Replies: 69
Views: 3170

Re: Optimal Hub Motor design? Break down of BionX D-Series

madin88 wrote:
liveforphysics wrote:It's a nice motor and you did excellent work with it. I'm excited to see how it runs when you find a controller pair that's a good fit.
Yeah it would be a pity to not get it running.
The design and fabrication quality of the axle, stator spider and flanges is awesome - even the part where the brake rotor is bolted to has improved form stability (for beeing lightweight) :)
Only thing i don't like so much are the plastic sidecovers which are likely the main reason for the loud noise. It is really stupid to go for a lightweight material and than add heavy noise damping foils.

btw: weight of the case is 1780g incl sprocket
and the stator 2270g with all my wiring
edit
entire wheel: 6,3kg (MXUS 3000 e.g. is twice as heavy also with bicycle wheel)

I wonder if the bipolar hall sensors could be the reason why it doesn't work with Adaptto?
They sense both, north and south pole, while usual hub motor sensors like the SS41 only react to one pole.
As there is a gap between the magnets, i guess the singals will look different, but i don't have the equipment to measure it...
Swap to SS41 Honeywell halls?
by madin88
Sep 09, 2017 2:38 am
Forum: Motor Technology
Topic: Optimal Hub Motor design? Break down of BionX D-Series
Replies: 69
Views: 3170

Re: Optimal Hub Motor design? Break down of BionX D-Series

liveforphysics wrote:It's a nice motor and you did excellent work with it. I'm excited to see how it runs when you find a controller pair that's a good fit.
Yeah it would be a pity to not get it running.
The design and fabrication quality of the axle, stator spider and flanges is awesome - even the part where the brake rotor is bolted to has improved form stability (for beeing lightweight) :)
Only thing i don't like so much are the plastic sidecovers which are likely the main reason for the loud noise. It is really stupid to go for a lightweight material and than add heavy noise damping foils.

btw: weight of the case is 1780g incl sprocket
and the stator 2270g with all my wiring
edit
entire wheel: 6,3kg (MXUS 3000 e.g. is twice as heavy also with bicycle wheel)

I wonder if the bipolar hall sensors could be the reason why it doesn't work with Adaptto?
They sense both, north and south pole, while usual hub motor sensors like the SS41 only react to one pole.
As there is a gap between the magnets, i guess the singals will look different, but i don't have the equipment to measure it...
by alsmith
Aug 30, 2017 8:12 am
Forum: Polls & Surveys
Topic: What is your favorite 500W-3000W Direct Drive Hub Motor?
Replies: 39
Views: 10453

Re: What is your favorite 500W-3000W Direct Drive Hub Motor?

rojitor wrote:My first fav is mxus 3000 4t
My second fav is mxus v2
My third fav is mxus 3000 3t
I am DONE with xlyte. The day they started making the axles with butter I erased that brand forever.
What day was that? Or from which series?
by Rix
Aug 23, 2017 7:12 pm
Forum: E-Bike Photos & Video
Topic: Stealth FUTR owners builds and pics
Replies: 1885
Views: 54965

Re: Stealth FUTR owners builds and pics

born49 wrote:Hello guys,
I am possibly one of those who is driving Adaptto controller with MXUS 3000 V3 4T motor in sub-optimal way.
I would like to fix it :) I tried to fine-tune settings little bit after autodetection, but motor is still getting hot
very fast for my taste (I use FF) and also torque at higher speeds is quite poor. I would like to try settings
that Rix suggested, but I am not sure with value 158 for 'PWR timing'. It seems completely outside of range.
Do you actually mean 1.58 ? If yes, I am ready to try it ! :)

Thanks !
Yes, I meant +1.58 Allex suggested running up to 2.1, try both and let us know what you find.
by born49
Aug 23, 2017 1:58 pm
Forum: E-Bike Photos & Video
Topic: Stealth FUTR owners builds and pics
Replies: 1885
Views: 54965

Re: Stealth FUTR owners builds and pics

Hello guys,
I am possibly one of those who is driving Adaptto controller with MXUS 3000 V3 4T motor in sub-optimal way.
I would like to fix it :) I tried to fine-tune settings little bit after autodetection, but motor is still getting hot
very fast for my taste (I use FF) and also torque at higher speeds is quite poor. I would like to try settings
that Rix suggested, but I am not sure with value 158 for 'PWR timing'. It seems completely outside of range.
Do you actually mean 1.58 ? If yes, I am ready to try it ! :)

Thanks !
by rojitor
Aug 11, 2017 5:39 am
Forum: Polls & Surveys
Topic: What is your favorite 500W-3000W Direct Drive Hub Motor?
Replies: 39
Views: 10453

Re: What is your favorite 500W-3000W Direct Drive Hub Motor?

My first fav is mxus 3000 4t
My second fav is mxus v2
My third fav is mxus 3000 3t
I am DONE with xlyte. The day they started making the axles with butter I erased that brand forever.