In China

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neptronix   100 GW

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Re: In China

Post by neptronix » Oct 07 2013 12:05pm

So cool, Kingfisher!! thanks for making this post!
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Lock   10 GW

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Re: In China

Post by Lock » Oct 07 2013 1:40pm

Careful Nep... Expect to see maybe sometime soon bunches of Aussies staggering around claiming they are thirsty from visiting and tasting that too salty lake...

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Re: In China

Post by Hillhater » Oct 07 2013 5:27pm

Kingfish wrote:-.... easy to navigate if you know the way. Not at all like London .......
?? You cannot be suggesting that London Underground is not easy to navigate.. ?
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Re: In China

Post by Kingfish » Oct 07 2013 8:04pm

Hillhater wrote:
Kingfish wrote:-.... easy to navigate if you know the way. Not at all like London .......
?? You cannot be suggesting that London Underground is not easy to navigate.. ?
The difference I was suggesting is that there is a crush of people going through London, whereas I did not experience that level in Suzhou. Actually - I meant exactly what I said because London has a vastly more extensive system and Suzhou has but one line. :wink:

Just a tiny observation. Don't shoot the messenger.
~KF
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Re: In China

Post by zombiess » Oct 08 2013 1:44am

Kingfish wrote: [*]China (中国). The first part I’m not entirely sure, although I can tell you that the 2nd part is explained like this: It’s the King (王) on his Throne inside
Literal translation is "Middle Kingdom" if I am correct.
中 is middle or center. Think of an arrow piercing a target and you will never forget it.

I am more use to seeing the traditional characters since I started learning Cantonese which is really strange for a white person, Gweilo (鬼佬) Ghost person :)

This is China in Cantonese / traditional characters 中國

I spent a lot of time in Hong Kong, but only for 2-3 weeks at a time. Wish I could move there. I have never been to main land though. Only HK and Macao. It's strange watching Cantonese movies and being able to pick up some of what is being said. My wife and I watched "A Chinese Torture Chamber Story" on YouTube yesterday. Totally not safe for work, but worth it for the laughs / boobies. She is Filipino but lived in HK for 13 years so she knows some Cantonese.
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sk8norcal   100 MW

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Re: In China

Post by sk8norcal » Oct 08 2013 2:09am

"This is China in Cantonese / traditional characters. 中國"

ok white guy, i gotta correct u here. :wink:

u should say,
"This is China in traditional characters 中國"

there is whole island of Mandarin speakers that use traditional characters....

personally, I think simplified characters is just ugly, aesthetic-wise.
I heard there is a trend for mainlanders to use traditional characters when it comes to store signs and business cards.....

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Re: In China

Post by zombiess » Oct 08 2013 3:35am

sk8norcal wrote:"This is China in Cantonese / traditional characters. 中國"

ok white guy, i gotta correct u here. :wink:

u should say,
"This is China in traditional characters 中國"

there is whole island of Mandarin speakers that use traditional characters....

personally, I think simplified characters is just ugly, aesthetic-wise.
I heard there is a trend for mainlanders to use traditional characters when it comes to store signs and business cards.....
Just going off of what I was previously told from both Cantonese and Mandarin speakers. Both sets are found in both languages and in many locations. Both are certainly very complex languages. I'm also told that Cantonese is written differently than Mandarin (I think the Character order might be slightly different) I have received some really shocked looks both in Hong Kong (had a cabbie almost jump out of his seat when I asked him if he spoke English in Cantonese) and in the USA when I speak just a little Cantonese (I don't know much maybe 200 words/phrases, not even close to enough to hold a conversation.. Even though I'm told my pronunciation is pretty good (they can understand me and say I have my words are pretty close), their minds are not ready to hear a white guy speak their language (white people in HK are too lazy to learn the local language and expect everyone to speak English since it's an official language there) and are expecting English. At first I thought I was totally messing up what I was saying but then I found out it was more of the other persons mind being in the wrong mental gear.

I noticed the same thing when I speak Tagalog in the Philippines or here in the USA to Filipinos. They just aren't ready for a Kano to speak Tagalog and their mind is in the wrong gear and I usually have to repeat myself. Gets a good laugh and the Filipinas really seem to dig it. P.S. Average looking fit white guy in the USA = Hottie in the Philippines. I can't remember ever having girls call out to me before, but there it's like I was a rock star or something (normal girls, not bar/pickup girls). Total role reversal, I felt like a piece of meat. Need to go back to get an ego boost.
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Re: In China

Post by Kingfish » Oct 08 2013 10:53am

^ +2 All very good! :) Thanks for the Middle Kingdom clue; I see that symbol often paired with others – and using Google-Translate, I now believe it just means “Middle” or “Center” (中) which makes sense when combined with 2nd incomplete phrase “Country” (国).

I hung out with two distinct groups of ethnic Chinese: Those younger people at the Hotel as employees and university student interns, and those young professionals I interacted with at the job site. These encounters often felt like love Jerry Lewis received from the French; really a warm wonderful open mindshare of a type that never occurs stateside. I think that if you’re honest, concise, and respectful – well that’s all the calling card you need.

Told more than once that I wasn’t like the rest – did my best to explain that it’s because I’m a Boy Scout - which they didn’t understand: This begets a long tale about “What is a Boy Scout”, the Motto – “Be Prepared”, the “Boy Scout Law”, and then Girl Scouts, Cub Scouts, Brownies, Campfire Girls, “Order of the Arrow”, Youth Conservation Corp… and these folks are eating it up! In their eyes, we’re Cowboys and Indians, we’re explorers of the wild frontier chock full of ideas and ambition and unending passion. We’re liberated, free to choose to pursue our dream – whatever that may be. Explaining this and receiving their friendly attention is like the best “feel-good” movie of the year, and I get to see these people every day! :D

Moving back to the monolog, here’s a timely article published in the Seattle Times:
Gary Locke: China ‘hungry’ for U.S. products

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I can certainly tell you they're embracing Americana here beside the Subway entrance at the Suzhou Amusement Land.

China is an ancient culture. Their artistry extends back over 3500 years, a record that pales all western cultures. Taking the tour through the Suzhou Museum, I was a little put off by the limited information on display; we’re talking about a population of 4 million – yet the size of the museum is about on par with the Redmond City Library. It cost me nothing to enter, but 60 RMB for the Chinese-to-English electronic narration device which was a complete bust: Maybe one in 5 displays had an English version to listen to, but the old codger’s voice spoke so slow that I could have woven a beard before exiting the place. It was very crowded and very difficult to get good clean shots. Here’s a few:

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Ancient Porcelain figure. I named him “Shaolin” out of respect.

BTW – did I forget to mention that almost every educated Chinese person I met had an English Name? They also gave me a Chinese Name; perhaps more on that in a bit.

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This is one long intricately carved elephant tusk. Appears yellow-shifted because flash is prohibited.

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Beautiful finery here…

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And here. In the Humble Administrator’s Garden there was much more regal apparel although it was so dark in there – and you can’t use flash.

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Room with a View

OK, so there’s a little story here too: This is just a simple window looking out at some bamboo as I moved between rooms to a rock garden. I was walking past and the museum guard motioned me to take the photo, so I casually popped off a shot and thought nothing of it. Then he comes over and demands my camera. “Oh crap” I thought – don’t want any trouble so I handed it over. Then he takes my camera mildly chastises me through readable gestures, then proceeds to re-shoot the window, handing me the camera back when done. This is his photo. I guess when you don’t have a lot of money - contemplating nature’s simplicity is enough rich reward. I’m glad he was a friendly guard for this was my only infraction on an otherwise spotless trip! :oops: :wink:

Filing the expense report, KF
EDIT: sorry - factual typos
* My 2WD Garden Wall
* Kinaye MotorSports
* Primary ride: 2WD Disc 9C 2806-equiv / Dual Lyen 12FET / 20S7P LiPo.
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* 50-mph, 101, 10k-Club. 12,527 miles-to-date, 7037 as 2WD.

It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the beans of Java that thoughts acquire speed.
The hands acquire shakes, the shakes become a warning.
It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion.

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Lock   10 GW

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Re: In China

Post by Lock » Oct 08 2013 12:40pm

Oh oh... Now we're going to lapse into Chinese astromylogistic zodiac signs... (The new year begins on February 10th shortly after the New moon in Aquarius, the humanitarian of the zodiac.)

Technically, I am a "snake"...And it's true, I prefer to slither around in the cracks... Between "what is possible", I mean... What a hockey player might term "stickhandling"... Hehe... And 2013 is the year of the "water snake"... Anyone else here like to splash around much? Or are an ox or a rooster?

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Re: In China

Post by MikeFairbanks » Oct 08 2013 8:18pm

That was awesome. It's amazing how an ordinary look into another culture can be extraordinary. That was better than National Geographic. Seriously.
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Re: In China

Post by Sancho's Horse » Oct 09 2013 2:04am

The term "middle kingdom" is mostly just a term they give to westerners which doesn't reveal the true nature of the characters for China. The actual calligraphy represents the king's, as the living embodiment of the whole of the Chinese people, unification of the heavens and the earth. The heavens were much more than westerners typically think of, the sky, stars, all of that. The Chinese were building armillary spheres way before other cultures because they felt the travel of the heavenly bodies held fate and clues to unlocking fates hidden mystery in their movements. Several books, such as the famous I Ching sought to clarify and unravel the mysteries of fate. So, what the Chinese are really saying is that China is the nation of destiny, and their destiny is both a cause and a result of their singular enlightened status unifying the heavens and the earth.

Another interesting tidbit, pay careful attention to how the Chinese you meet pronounce Washington, as in Washington D.C., because there is a subtle change in pronunciation which changes the meaning from a reverential meaning to literally, "peanut village." If they use tbe peanut village term, you can be pretty clear how they esteem you and America for business.

Also, a good way to show esteem to someone you respect is not to use the typical ni how greeting, but to use a greeting of "have you eaten".
The phrase changes across the country, with specific regional variations. Here is a site: http://www.standardmandarin.com/chinese ... -you-eaten This often will earn you lots of extra points, but they may be more guarded about the language they presume you will not understand, so use sparingly. China is always quite an experience.

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Re: In China

Post by Kingfish » Oct 11 2013 11:12am

Last Day in Suzhou – Friday, September 26th

There are several mini-adventures to share on this trip, although the one that will stay with me as a favorite is my last full day before handing back to the States. Had the day off so I was footloose and free. Conspired with a couple of my new Chinese to go site seeing and they hatched a plan that took me to the Taihu Lake Wetland Park. They were playing hooky, so let’s call them “En” & “Jay” so they remain MiB cognito :wink:

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#1 = Taihu Lake Wetland Park, and #3 is Shangri-La Hotel

The origin of the park is rather obvious, though the drive out to the park was even more revealing about the aggressive industry of commercial expansion. The Day begins when my pals pick me up at the hotel. If you review the map, from location #3 we lit out north to Taihu Ave – a freeway of sorts that if you were to draw with your finger the route west, the terrain becomes somewhat lush and hilly at the first green splotch (left of the words “Taihu Ave”) to “Xiyanshan”: This is a transition zone between drainage basins that at first appears as rocky outcrops to rolling hills before approaching the mountainous “Xiyanshan” section. We’re in the car so picture taking would be difficult. But as we went past the first hill cut, it was close enough to the road that you could see people scaling the face of the cut – like people rock-climbing at REI or Goat Rock or Half Dome or any number of places around the planet. And as I pointed this out, Jay said they were “fake, dummies” – as in mannequins! That brought a laugh cos both En & I thought he was joking. :lol:

Jay drives us onward past Xiyanshan and on the backside – I kid you not – they are shaving the mountain side away in a massive mining operation. I asked Jay about this, the answer En interpreted as “they’re mining for dirt”. Indeed, the rolling hills suggested they were once ancient quarries for stone. In addition, like everywhere that I see as I venture beyond the 7-mile visibility limit is another sector of high-rise commercial construction including light manufacturing, big-named glamorous hotels, mega shopping complexes, and clusters of urban dwellings connecting (or in the process of being connected) by new light rail - most of which stand empty and awaiting clientele. This rapid break-neck growth goes on mile after mile from horizon to horizon in all directions as we travel west towards Dongbanlang and Zhenhuzhen -> the north entrance to Taihu Lake Wetland Park.

Image

Once at the park, we get our tickets and head through the gate and tunnel through a wisteria-type overgrowth that was charming and invocative of nature taming our soul. On the other side we purchased tickets for the boat tour which takes a circuitous route around the lake – stopping at 4 touristy points along the way. You can get to each of these destinations by walking and they are connected by bridges, but the boat ride definitely speeds up sight-seeing.

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Ahoy matey!

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Beautiful bridge work! This route would eventually connect you to the panda palace.

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Suzhou Pavilion on the lake.

The first place we stopped at was a tiny cluster of buildings celebrating the Suzhou Pavilion at the 2011? Shanghai Expo (forgive me – I don’t recall the precise details). As pavilions go, this one was well put together and I really enjoyed the creative displays of light and shadow to create delightful atmosphere of discovery and ancient history. Forget taking photos; it’s all projected and you simply have to see it to believe. There’s no fee, so you’re good to go and spend time enjoying the wonder.

Bill the Pony
Taking the trails here and there, we end up where there’s a horse tied off at a rail. I named him “Bill the Pony” who was owned by the Hobbits in Lord of the Rings. Bill looked so lonesome there all tied up. Bill paws at the ground. I ape in reaction and paw at the ground. Bill wobbles his head. I wobble my head and fake neighing – which has En & Jay laughing – though now I have Bill’s undivided attention. I told Bill I wished I had an apple to feed him. Then a caretaker approaches and asks if I want to ride him. Obviously the only task Bill has in Life - other than stand around - is to give kiddie rides over a short loop. Off in the distance I see Bill has other buddies. We decline the caretakers offer. It’s a sad life for Bill, though I’m certain he’d like an apple.

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Lonesome Bill

Back to the boat for another leg – this time to the Panda compound. As we leave the boat passes within sight of Bill so I wave and say good bye to him; he wobbled his head in acknowledgement (or so I’d like to believe).

It is here that I begin to understand the origin of this place: They mined it for dirt! They mined it on such a broad scale that you can probably see it from low Earth orbit. When they took all the dirt they could, the land was flooded and turned into a “wetland reclamation and restoration project”, and oh – let’s throw in some tourist attractions and mine the pockets of visitors. I don’t mean to cheapen the efforts here – but let’s call the kettle black. Nearly every tree here is a transplant. I saw firsthand rows of large 30-40 foot tall trees limbed and bound for placement; they have such a tiny root ball that they need structural support until they literally get their footing establish. Regardless of the origin, it is an epic enterprise taken with serious reverence – and there is no shortage of cut stone pavers lining the paths and well-constructed wood and stone bridges. Give it 30 years and you might not be able to tell its’ man-made. Let’s continue on…

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Happy little boat upon the water...

We took the boat to the second destination which is also the East Gate Entrance. Ambled around the dock and headed off through a lushly-planted garden towards the Panda area.

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Looks impressive! Where's the critters?

The pandas were not there. We walked around to the backside and behind the floor to ceiling glass walls were two pandas attempting to get some shuteye inside the shelter during the midday heat. The ass-end of a panda is not much to look at so I didn’t bother to pester them for a better shot. I mean, how would you feel if you were taking a siesta and some voyeur came tapping at your window expecting you to smile and eat bamboo? Geez no wonder they have trouble mating. We head back towards the boat launch and I captured this pict of a Chinese Junk awaiting restoration. Then Jay gets a cryptic call from work and tells En that they have to go back. The tone of our adventure sours a bit. I think I might have got them into trouble.

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Some repair required. Can't wait to see it sail!

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Remember that little man from Fantasy Island? “Da boat, da boat!”

Long moments of Silence. The boat arrives without ceremony and we pile in. Jay tells the Captain of our scupper to just keep going and not stop at the 3rd dock. We have to go. On the way back I notice there are no beaches, no tidal action except for the wake the boat makes whilst gliding by. An idea forms and I cut through the solitude with levity and explain how they could really liven the place up with a few crocodiles laying wait and ambush boats as they go by! Maybe add some piranha to keep hands out of the water? Or perhaps a piranha-feeding station… throw in the old goat (as in your boss), watch the water churn, yeah that would work! And the guys loosen up… the small parade of banter and camaraderie returns as spirits lift from gray fog.

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Looks like a good place to ditch a body, er... feed the fish. Imagine if they added some crocs, you know - liven the action it up a bit :twisted:

Of course I think it completely helped that we became lost at the last stop and were forced to hike our way out. That was fun for me in my all-weather Seattle F.O. boots – but the guys who were in office shoes… maybe not. Back at the car, off we go towards town. It takes a good half hour before we pass that same spot with the rock-scaling peoples, and sure enough… they are mannequins! Oh too funny: There’s one at the bottom holding a rope, one at the top with his hands on his waist looking down, four in scaling repose – and not favoring well considering the heat, humidity, and adverse weather tearing at their clothing! Next time – I promise we’ll stop and I’ll get some photos.

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The last bridge is beautifully cut from stone.

Back at the hotel, they dropped me off, handshakes, then tear-arse they went back to work on a Friday at 3 PM. No rest for the weary.

Great time though; wouldn’t trade it for the world! 8)

Y’all want more? KF
* My 2WD Garden Wall
* Kinaye MotorSports
* Primary ride: 2WD Disc 9C 2806-equiv / Dual Lyen 12FET / 20S7P LiPo.
* Epics: Going to California: 2011 8)
* 50-mph, 101, 10k-Club. 12,527 miles-to-date, 7037 as 2WD.

It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the beans of Java that thoughts acquire speed.
The hands acquire shakes, the shakes become a warning.
It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion.

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Re: In China

Post by beast775 » Oct 13 2013 9:54am

I hope i can order a ebike kit when i go there.... wonder how that works? starting TESL in a few months hopefully.thanks for the excellent read kingfish.mark.
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Re: In Mexico

Post by Kingfish » Jan 26 2014 3:59pm

Well shoot. I let this thread die when I’ve been away. Truth is – I have been a busy little KF racking up the air miles. I’ll recap:
  • September: Spent about 24 days in Suzhou, CN.
  • November: 18 days in Guadalajara, MX followed by another 12 back at Suzhou.
  • January: Quick trip to southern China via Canada & Hong Kong -> there and back again in reverse.
That last trip I racked up about 90 hours in one week and came back with a little friend living in my sinuses. I’m a tough old bird though and have been putting up the good fight. Also, allow me to categorize my Customs experiences:
  • Vancouver B.C.: Really – I think they must have it out for Americans.
  • Hong Kong: In the Airport, no problems. Coming from China through the Ferry Ports, total cattle dodge (Moo!) Only thing missing is the hot brand on yer arse.
  • China from HK: Not as bad. Shanghai is OK too.
  • Mexico, aside from being slow – is a lot like a cattle crawl. Only had a problem with one jerk leaving for CN via LAX right at the gate as I was boarding the plan: Some joe with a metal wand wanted to re-inspect my bags; I think he was looking for a bribe as he rifled through my stuff. I put a stop to it when he was carelessly about to open a magnetically sealed eye-glasses case that I had been using to store coinage: Looked at him right in the eyes and said “It’s just coins man.” What a dick.
  • United States: Coming back from CN to Seattle, and from MX into LAX were fine; but from YVR – inhospitable bastards.
Image
Plaza beside the Guadalajara Cathedral.

Recap, or perhaps madcap adventures…
Gawds save me from Mexico! What a hoot. I must have gained 15 lbs. from all the arrachera we ate. If yer a “foodie” – Guadalajara is your town. And they have a number of local beers that you’ll never find in the States that have more character than traditional Mexican beers. I stayed at the Fiesta Americana on the Avenue of the Americas. Don’t let anyone kid you: It’s a 3-star hotel. However it’s on par with other offerings and located in the heart of the financial center – which means lots of places to dine and drink within a short walk.

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A mosaic: One block away from the previous image.

The Federales are a constant presence near the Hotel riding with what looks like a modified Humvee with a 50-cal and six others in cammo hanging off the sides. I just sort of ignored that part and was fine. Guadalajara is an old colonial town, and from the looks of it – hasn’t changed a whole lot. The roads are in crap shape and their old buildings are falling apart, but new construction is constant, although without continuity and many unfinished projects. Still – the air was remarkably clean and summery warm for November. Nearly every day I was taken out to long lunches. Dinners were superb as well. 8) Only once did I over-do it and had two spicy dishes back to back and paid for it with my first ever bout of indigestion; now I understand what a heart attack can feel like. :roll:

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Room with a view. Looking north & west. Golf course on the right.

I wasn’t there long enough to have a girlfriend, but the women are there to be sure. Growing up in California, it’s just surprising how much Spanish I really knew and that helped quite a bit. Though lots of people speak English there.

The Hat Story
I had promised to wear a cowboy hat back to China. Problem was that the straw colored hat was in California and I had no plans to go there before China. But I knew they’d have hats in Mexico, so the hunt was on to find them. I went on three occasions looking for hats and only on the last did I find one worthy – a black pistelero-style sombrero which I bought for about $75 USD; I spent too much but it’s a nice looking hat. The story is more involved… perhaps for another time.

Image
Looking northwest on the Avenue of the Americas; the Fiesta is buried behind these buildings.

There's also a Tequila Story... I'll save it for another day :wink:

Note: Did not see any EV activity; all ICE here.

More in a bit... KF
* My 2WD Garden Wall
* Kinaye MotorSports
* Primary ride: 2WD Disc 9C 2806-equiv / Dual Lyen 12FET / 20S7P LiPo.
* Epics: Going to California: 2011 8)
* 50-mph, 101, 10k-Club. 12,527 miles-to-date, 7037 as 2WD.

It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the beans of Java that thoughts acquire speed.
The hands acquire shakes, the shakes become a warning.
It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion.

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Re: In China

Post by Kingfish » Jan 26 2014 4:22pm

Back to China
I wore the cowboy hat on the plane. It made people smile. It was a hit at work too.

Image
Flying in from Guadalajara, Mexico into LA Basin: Unbelievably clear! Layover lasted about 3 hours. Then off to Shanghai...

The smog had definitely increased with the drop in temperatures. I was pretty busy the whole time – except for one night in particular that was outstanding after being invited to join another project. I think I talked about “Japanese Street” before. We hit the same sushi bar three nights in one week and it was excellent every time. Also we hit the Meister Brau again. I wore the cowboy. The 3-piece band played out an entire set devoted to cowboy music on my behalf! Thanks guys… :lol:

Image
Smog intesity varied through the day: On the left, picture was taken at 8:22AM, and on the right at 11:37AM. And I thought this was bad...

There’s another part of town called SIP that I wanted to explore but ran out of time. Maybe next time.

After 12 days I flew away to be with family Stateside in California just in time for Thanksgiving. Spent Christmas home in Seattle preparing for the next trip.
More in a bit, KF
* My 2WD Garden Wall
* Kinaye MotorSports
* Primary ride: 2WD Disc 9C 2806-equiv / Dual Lyen 12FET / 20S7P LiPo.
* Epics: Going to California: 2011 8)
* 50-mph, 101, 10k-Club. 12,527 miles-to-date, 7037 as 2WD.

It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the beans of Java that thoughts acquire speed.
The hands acquire shakes, the shakes become a warning.
It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion.

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Re: In Hong Kong

Post by Kingfish » Jan 26 2014 5:12pm

Third Trip to China
By December I knew I was going back to China again; the writing was on the wall, though I didn’t get notice until a day before. Couldn’t find a direct flight to HK, so I took the route through Vancouver BC, Canada instead. I had nothing but hassle through Canada; I don’t understand why our closest neighbor and trading partner has to let it be this way – but there it is.

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Hong Kong Victoria Harbor on Saturday January 12, 2014. Visibility is about 3-4 miles

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Same day, pulling into the Zhongshan Ferry Terminal. Visibility is 2 miles at best.

Got in too late to catch the ferry so I spent the night at the SkyCity Marriott next to the HK Airport; alright as hotels go – but very removed from any night life. Next day I took a taxi to the Ferry Terminal and took a 90-minute ride through Victoria Harbor west towards provinces of old Canton. There was no car waiting for me but found a taxi to the Sheraton in Zhongshan (Chinese: 中山 which means “Middle Mountain”, although a century before it was called Xiangshan 香山 "Fragrant Mountain"). Zhongshan is also has the distinction of being the home of the largest LED manufacturing production in the world.

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At night. This image does a disservice to the true illuminated light show right out my window that is both dynamic and beautiful!

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Same view in the daytime. We're looking about SE down river from the 29th floor of the Zhongshan Sheraton Hotel.

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This view is taken 6 days later when much of the smog had blew away. Looking about NE upriver.

I didn’t travel too far on my own from the hotel, although our work site took over an hour to get to by shuttle. In the pictures you’ll notice they all have a yellow hue; that’s morning sun light through the effects of smog. Later in the day as the sun climbs overhead the hue because far less yellow. It’s night by the time we get back to the hotel. The night before the full moon a strong wind blew away much of the smog and I was able to see Jupiter beside the rising Moon; that’s the first time I have ever seen a star in China. The color of the Full Moon was blood red; more red than any Harvest Moon I’ve ever seen.

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The next series of images were taken over three days.

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Fish Farms.

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Woman on an ICE bicycle. There are a lot of crazy contrapations on the road. I've seen double-action single-piston reciprocating mules pulling sand and brick. But on this trip, maybe two EVs.

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A normal street in rural China.

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For all the hype that Hong Kong receives, the smog does it a disservice. From the the ride out to the work site, China is carving up the mountains for dirt and stone building roads and structures for the new tomorrow. In the Pearl River Delta, I thought those watery fields were rice paddies – but was told they’re fish farms. The bright rust-red trees that appear dead are the Metasequoia glyptostroboides – a deciduous redwood, in autumn coloring. Notice the height; they were discovered in China in 1941 when they were thought to be extinct. China has since spread the seeds far and wide (I planted 50 on my tree farm).

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Metasequoia glyptostroboides.

I busted my ass that week and didn’t have a lot of time off. The pictures from the ferry are disappointing because the windows are not cleaned. We were not allowed to go top-side either. I sat in First Class on the way back hoping for better windows but they were equally scratched/damaged there as well.

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Some sort of power generation plant. Remember this image - I'll make a reference to it later...

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Mountains come right down to the sea, creating a natural deep water harbor. This freeway skirts the rim of the harbor with little room left over.

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The Ritz-Carlton: Worlds' tallest Hotel.

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On Saturday the 19th I woke up at 6AM with orders to proceed back home ASAP. Couldn’t get cash from the ATMs here in this part of China because my PIN is too long, but was able to work out a solution using up the rest of my USD and placing some expenses on the Hotel bill. Mad dash back to the China Ferry, then 90 minute ride across Victoria Harbor, then shuttle to the Rapid Rail, then 25 minute rail ride to the Airport, run through the immigration gauntlet and made it to the gate just as the plain was boarding at 4PM. The flight was 11 hours to Vancouver BC, 5 hour layover then one hour flight to Seattle, a quick taxi had me home by 6:30PM local time – and it was still Saturday. Plenty of Time for a beer.

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Just above the plane on the left, in the hazy background is that power generation plant. The peak of the pointy mountain is only 7 miles from where I am standing.

This last trip was only 10 days long and really had my health twisted around; barely over jet-lag in China, then recalled – I’ve been struggling with a sinus affliction (not a full on cold, but close). And I am to leave again very soon. No rest for the wicked!

Wish I had time to tell you all the dirt; there’s just no time to write it all down. However I found that I like reading novels on the plane best, and perhaps because nothing else beats the monotony. I certainly can’t hardly stand to read novels at home anymore.

More stories when I can. Safe travels, KF.
* My 2WD Garden Wall
* Kinaye MotorSports
* Primary ride: 2WD Disc 9C 2806-equiv / Dual Lyen 12FET / 20S7P LiPo.
* Epics: Going to California: 2011 8)
* 50-mph, 101, 10k-Club. 12,527 miles-to-date, 7037 as 2WD.

It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the beans of Java that thoughts acquire speed.
The hands acquire shakes, the shakes become a warning.
It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion.

cassschr1   10 kW

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Re: In China

Post by cassschr1 » Jan 26 2014 7:46pm

What type of work are you doing now?

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Re: In China

Post by zombiess » Jan 26 2014 7:54pm

If you need a Girlfriend in HK for a night or a weekend go down to Wan Chai. STAY OUT of the girlie bars unless you want to be ripped off. Joe Bananas is a decent place to hang out, independent Thai girls, bands and normal couples in the bar. The girls will find you.

Wan Chai can be a lot of fun as it is a bit of a red light district. I don't have a lot of experience there but know some who call it their second home so i have had a lot of second hand knowledge. mongering isn't my thing, but having company for a weekend to go site seeing while I was single made it more interesting. For hangouts go to Lan Kwai Fong in central, entire block of bars and lots of expats to talk with. LKF hotel there is nice but you will here the noise from the bars... One night I was awakened by hundreds if not more singing oh Canada. It was Canada day and lkf was celebrating.

Dammit, I miss going to HK, so does my wife. We talk about it all the time. Wish I could live there for a few years. Nice to not have to own a car. Amazing food too. You have probably noticed that outside of the US food tastes different, I know I did. I do not like to eat, but in some countries I have been to I really enjoyed food.
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ridethelightning   1 MW

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Re: In China

Post by ridethelightning » Jan 26 2014 9:39pm

great shots! thanks for posting. :D

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Re: In China

Post by 100volts+ » Jan 26 2014 9:54pm

If you need a Girlfriend in HK for a night or a weekend
Hell, probably no need to pay. Chinese women can't be frigid, there are, after all, 1.4 billion Chinese.

PS I was in HK in 82. Left a briefcase with $10000.00 in a taxi. I couldn't believe the taxi driver turned it in to the police. How f##kin lucky is that. Went to a massage parlour but couldn't even get a handjob.

EDIT: The massage parlour might have been in Taiwan. It was a long time ago.
Last edited by 100volts+ on Jan 26 2014 9:59pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: In China

Post by trevc2 » Jan 26 2014 9:56pm

100volts+ wrote:
If you need a Girlfriend in HK for a night or a weekend
Hell, probably no need to pay. Chinese women can't be frigid, there are, after all, 1.4 billion Chinese.
Yeah, a few drinks and some cowboy charm. Done.

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Re: In China

Post by 100volts+ » Jan 26 2014 10:02pm

I'm jealous of Kingfish. My 32 year old memories are still in Technicolor.
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Unlike puppets we have the possibility of stopping in our movements,
looking up and perceiving the machinery by which we have been moved. In this
act lies the first steps towards freedom. - PETER BERGER Sociologist

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Re: In China

Post by Kingfish » Jan 29 2014 4:42am

cassschr1 wrote:What type of work are you doing now?
I do the same type of work as I always have: Create Product. However the role that I have presently has me traveling to provide onsite support during manufacturing.

On the subject of GFs: I’m not looking for a one-night stand. I’m not looking to buy one for the night either. If in my travels I meet a nice gal and we’re compatible – who am I to complain. 8) But I’m not on the hunt for one. Window-shopping… sure. But not hunting.

Right now I just enjoy meeting new peoples from different cultures and working with them to create solutions. When on travel, the hours are long and arduous. Work hard, play hard. I enjoy my time off all the more. Trying new foods is fun if you go with someone that has experience.

Except for the hassles of immigration and long queues, travelling has been a real treat.

In China for the New Year, KF
* My 2WD Garden Wall
* Kinaye MotorSports
* Primary ride: 2WD Disc 9C 2806-equiv / Dual Lyen 12FET / 20S7P LiPo.
* Epics: Going to California: 2011 8)
* 50-mph, 101, 10k-Club. 12,527 miles-to-date, 7037 as 2WD.

It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the beans of Java that thoughts acquire speed.
The hands acquire shakes, the shakes become a warning.
It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion.

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Happy Chinese New Year!

Post by Kingfish » Jan 30 2014 7:21pm

Happy Chinese New Year ES Peoples!

The pyrotechnics have been non-stop since midday yesterday and at 8AM there's still no letup – like a cannonade of staccato artillery in all quarters.

The fog/smog/haze is much thicker today; less than a mile from my high perch on the 35th floor. The hotel pub closed up at 11 PM last night; I was already in my room by then, jetlagged and likely asleep. However I recall wakening at 3AM and the fusillade was still ongoing.

Haven’t found a parade yet. It’s just ad hoc celebration all around.
OK, I have to go to work now; ‘tis the reason why I’m here. :wink:

Enjoy! KF
* My 2WD Garden Wall
* Kinaye MotorSports
* Primary ride: 2WD Disc 9C 2806-equiv / Dual Lyen 12FET / 20S7P LiPo.
* Epics: Going to California: 2011 8)
* 50-mph, 101, 10k-Club. 12,527 miles-to-date, 7037 as 2WD.

It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the beans of Java that thoughts acquire speed.
The hands acquire shakes, the shakes become a warning.
It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion.

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Re: Happy Chinese New Year!

Post by liveforphysics » Jan 30 2014 7:53pm

Kingfish wrote:Happy Chinese New Year ES Peoples!

The pyrotechnics have been non-stop since midday yesterday and at 8AM there's still no letup – like a cannonade of staccato artillery in all quarters.

The fog/smog/haze is much thicker today; less than a mile from my high perch on the 35th floor. The hotel pub closed up at 11 PM last night; I was already in my room by then, jetlagged and likely asleep. However I recall wakening at 3AM and the fusillade was still ongoing.

Haven’t found a parade yet. It’s just ad hoc celebration all around.
OK, I have to go to work now; ‘tis the reason why I’m here. :wink:

Enjoy! KF

Up until the 22nd of this month I was slated to be in China for the start of CNY this year. I was very excited to see the wild celebration! Plans got shifted back a month though last minute, but I'm glad you're there to enjoy it my friend!
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