Gilera Runner - Newbie tips

General Discussion about large electric scooters and motorcycles and other things with no pedals.
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lovro2209   1 µW

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Gilera Runner - Newbie tips

Post by lovro2209 » Feb 08 2018 5:09pm

Hello there,
I got my interest into electric motorcycles so I decided to maybe give it a go so, I have a couple of questions first before I start anything.
I'll be using a scooter frame, Gilera Runner SP 50 2010.
Weights ~100kg with the gas motor and everything, when everything unessesary is out, I am assuming should be around 80kg so taking that in mind starting
1st with the motor, I'd like a BLDC motor with good torque, thinking of something like 5-10kW of continious power. I need something that can pull me up to 100+km/h with gearing set up,but with good pulls.
2nd Controller that will suite the motor
3rd The batteries, okay so taking this statements up, I need something that can hold at least ~20km of "fun riding", and ~40+km of normal riding.
4th Gearing, okay so suggestions? Keeping the CVT and modifying in to the motor or going with a geared transmission?
Okay now, taking all that in mind, is this possible within 1500,2000$ range? If not, what could I look for? considering all of the work is done by me.
Thanks alot in advanced, regards :D :D

lovro2209   1 µW

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Re: Gilera Runner - Newbie tips

Post by lovro2209 » Feb 16 2018 10:48am

bump

John in CR   100 GW

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Re: Gilera Runner - Newbie tips

Post by John in CR » Feb 16 2018 10:38pm

Do you have some pics of the frame without all the plastic. I ask because while it's a cool looking scoot, the shape doesn't appear to be very friendly to packing in a bunch of batteries down low where you want the bulk of them.

Forget "gearing", you want a powerful hubmotor to mount on it. My little commuter road rocket has your performance and range goals and then some, and I have it tuned to absolutely slaughter anything but big sports bikes during my other side of the city commute.

Sure, it's possible to do in your price range. A few qualifying questions first:
1. What kind of terrain do you have to deal with?...good roads...mostly flat...or steep hills?
2. How much do you weigh, and will you be carrying a passenger?
3. Do you have metal working equipment.

Easier, better, cheaper, would be to pick up an out of commission electric scooter designed to carry lead batteries, and upgrade it to lithium.

lovro2209   1 µW

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Re: Gilera Runner - Newbie tips

Post by lovro2209 » Feb 17 2018 5:31am

Hello,
Can you tell me what hub motor are you using and the advantages of using it over a normal motor and using a chain for example?
If I install a hub motor to it Ill have to remove the whole crankcase and weld a piece insted of it so i could fit the hub motor, right?
Well roads here are OK, mostly flat not a lot of steep hills, but I ride it on all kinds of terrains.
I weight around 75kg, and passengers sure, but not frequently.
Image Here's the bike frame that I found online.. I was thinking of removing the gas tank and putting the batteries there, if it's too little space I was thinking of putting it under the seat.
Thanks for your reply.

John in CR   100 GW

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Re: Gilera Runner - Newbie tips

Post by John in CR » Feb 17 2018 8:45pm

Like I thought, not much room for batteries.

The easiest would be to make a new swingarm for a hubmotor...pretty simple.

The biggest advantage of a hubmotor is that it leaves all that space for batteries, a space is the biggest premium on our electrics. Others are:
1. Simpler and easier.
2. Less complex makes it inherently more reliable.
3. More quiet...It's hard to appreciate until you've experienced it, but riding with near silence is a wonderful thing, though you do have to watch out more for moving obstacles that don't hear you.
4. Regen braking...not only does it add a bit more range, but it greatly reduces wear on mechanical brakes, so reduced maintenance and cost.

I use motors that are no longer manufactured, but QS motor has some good quality offerings. Their 273mm motor version 3 for export in a 13" scooter rim is used on even the biggest scooters, so one of those on a build meant to stay light will really rip if you feed it with sufficient power. Get one with a winding in the 14-18rpm/volt range, so you don't have to go with too high a voltage to get the speed you want. Just be sure to give it with enough current.

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mistercrash   10 kW

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Re: Gilera Runner - Newbie tips

Post by mistercrash » Feb 18 2018 11:24am

John is right about QS Motors. Contact them and tell them what your expectations are and they will steer you towards a motor and controller that will suit your needs. Their 8kw 13 inch motor would be more than enough to meet your demands. They have single shaft motors with removable wheel if you wish to make a swingarm that keeps the single shock configuration of your scooter. If you limit the amps to the controller via the software to 60% you will still accelerate faster than most cars off the line and that motor will not get too hot and your batteries will give more range and last longer. Space is limited on a scooter but yours has some room between your feet. That is where I would place the controller, contactor, main fuse, relays and such tucked under the center fairing. You have a good sized vertical space for a battery under your butt if you sacrifice the storage under the seat.
I am so sorry that you are experiencing difficulty in your life, but if you send $10 at paypal.me/Ray1964
, you will be in my thoughts and prayers.

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