Gilera Runner - Newbie tips

General Discussion about large electric scooters and motorcycles and other things with no pedals.
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lovro2209
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Gilera Runner - Newbie tips

Post by lovro2209 » Feb 08, 2018 5:09 pm

Hello there,
I got my interest into electric motorcycles so I decided to maybe give it a go so, I have a couple of questions first before I start anything.
I'll be using a scooter frame, Gilera Runner SP 50 2010.
Weights ~100kg with the gas motor and everything, when everything unessesary is out, I am assuming should be around 80kg so taking that in mind starting
1st with the motor, I'd like a BLDC motor with good torque, thinking of something like 5-10kW of continious power. I need something that can pull me up to 100+km/h with gearing set up,but with good pulls.
2nd Controller that will suite the motor
3rd The batteries, okay so taking this statements up, I need something that can hold at least ~20km of "fun riding", and ~40+km of normal riding.
4th Gearing, okay so suggestions? Keeping the CVT and modifying in to the motor or going with a geared transmission?
Okay now, taking all that in mind, is this possible within 1500,2000$ range? If not, what could I look for? considering all of the work is done by me.
Thanks alot in advanced, regards :D :D

lovro2209
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Re: Gilera Runner - Newbie tips

Post by lovro2209 » Feb 16, 2018 10:48 am

bump

John in CR
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Re: Gilera Runner - Newbie tips

Post by John in CR » Feb 16, 2018 10:38 pm

Do you have some pics of the frame without all the plastic. I ask because while it's a cool looking scoot, the shape doesn't appear to be very friendly to packing in a bunch of batteries down low where you want the bulk of them.

Forget "gearing", you want a powerful hubmotor to mount on it. My little commuter road rocket has your performance and range goals and then some, and I have it tuned to absolutely slaughter anything but big sports bikes during my other side of the city commute.

Sure, it's possible to do in your price range. A few qualifying questions first:
1. What kind of terrain do you have to deal with?...good roads...mostly flat...or steep hills?
2. How much do you weigh, and will you be carrying a passenger?
3. Do you have metal working equipment.

Easier, better, cheaper, would be to pick up an out of commission electric scooter designed to carry lead batteries, and upgrade it to lithium.

lovro2209
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Re: Gilera Runner - Newbie tips

Post by lovro2209 » Feb 17, 2018 5:31 am

Hello,
Can you tell me what hub motor are you using and the advantages of using it over a normal motor and using a chain for example?
If I install a hub motor to it Ill have to remove the whole crankcase and weld a piece insted of it so i could fit the hub motor, right?
Well roads here are OK, mostly flat not a lot of steep hills, but I ride it on all kinds of terrains.
I weight around 75kg, and passengers sure, but not frequently.
Image Here's the bike frame that I found online.. I was thinking of removing the gas tank and putting the batteries there, if it's too little space I was thinking of putting it under the seat.
Thanks for your reply.

John in CR
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Re: Gilera Runner - Newbie tips

Post by John in CR » Feb 17, 2018 8:45 pm

Like I thought, not much room for batteries.

The easiest would be to make a new swingarm for a hubmotor...pretty simple.

The biggest advantage of a hubmotor is that it leaves all that space for batteries, a space is the biggest premium on our electrics. Others are:
1. Simpler and easier.
2. Less complex makes it inherently more reliable.
3. More quiet...It's hard to appreciate until you've experienced it, but riding with near silence is a wonderful thing, though you do have to watch out more for moving obstacles that don't hear you.
4. Regen braking...not only does it add a bit more range, but it greatly reduces wear on mechanical brakes, so reduced maintenance and cost.

I use motors that are no longer manufactured, but QS motor has some good quality offerings. Their 273mm motor version 3 for export in a 13" scooter rim is used on even the biggest scooters, so one of those on a build meant to stay light will really rip if you feed it with sufficient power. Get one with a winding in the 14-18rpm/volt range, so you don't have to go with too high a voltage to get the speed you want. Just be sure to give it with enough current.

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