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Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

Posted: Dec 06 2018 7:08pm
by casainho
andyme wrote:
Dec 06 2018 7:01pm
casainho wrote:
Dec 06 2018 6:42pm
andyme wrote:
Dec 06 2018 6:39pm
i think there is not really a good reason not to go for the 48V version if you want to use a 48V battery. there are people who own 48V batteries and want e.g. to use them on two bikes, one having a 36 v motor and the other one a 48V motor. That can be done successfully. But if you are before a purchasing decision, the trend goes to 48V....I will attach a short overview of the things to do according to me, maybe this helps you.
Maybe we can add a FAQ entry for 48V VS 36V motor. Can someone please elaborate the question and answer to be placed on the FAQ?
do you agree with the main content of my answer? then i can try to edit something. if someone else knows better, please step in, it should just maybe not get too theoretical and complex.
I don't know very well. Maybe elaborating list of points of vantages and disadvantages and let user choose??

Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

Posted: Dec 07 2018 12:18am
by tomtom50
andyme wrote:
Dec 05 2018 4:26pm
endlesscadence has asked me to write down some kind of "how to go about it". He meant to go over it and post it on the wiki, but i am afraid he is no longer active. at least i have not see him post here for 2 weeks or so.

So therefore i am attaching what i have so far, there may be some mistakes in a few details, but the main information should be ok
I've been planning to try the open source firmware for a while, thanks for writing this. Nicely written, too.

If you are interested as I do the upgrade I can add to your document and send it to you. If you like the additions you can re-post. Maybe others would like to participate as well. A bit like wikipedia.

Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

Posted: Dec 07 2018 2:42am
by valkus
andyme wrote:
Dec 06 2018 6:39pm
i think there is not really a good reason not to go for the 48V version if you want to use a 48V battery. there are people who own 48V batteries and want e.g. to use them on two bikes, one having a 36 v motor and the other one a 48V motor. That can be done successfully. But if you are before a purchasing decision, the trend goes to 48V....I will attach a short overview of the things to do according to me, maybe this helps you.
Thanks andyme. Indeed the FAQ concerning 4 versions will be very very helpful ( a sort of comparison table concering hardware: motor, controller and different compatibility like 13cell compatible or not, weight).

Here is an example of what would be helpful for me:
Capture d’écran 2018-12-07 à 08.40.08.png
Capture d’écran 2018-12-07 à 08.40.08.png (33.61 KiB) Viewed 665 times

Thanks for the attachment, I read your doc beforehand, and still (it may be my poor understanding) it was not clear to me which version to purchaise. Even your answer above seems to be contradicting :)

The reason I'm asking all that is that I'll run on stock firmware for some time before I'll upgrade to opensource. Two problems seems possible to me:
1) I burn some components using 36V kit with 13cell battery,
2) It will not work due to some protection (I have an impression that I read someone's post about that) and i'll be really forced to upgrade the firmware at the very beginning

Anyway thanks for answering beginners questions.

Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

Posted: Dec 07 2018 3:50am
by andyme
valkus wrote:
Dec 07 2018 2:42am
andyme wrote:
Dec 06 2018 6:39pm
i think there is not really a good reason not to go for the 48V version if you want to use a 48V battery. there are people who own 48V batteries and want e.g. to use them on two bikes, one having a 36 v motor and the other one a 48V motor. That can be done successfully. But if you are before a purchasing decision, the trend goes to 48V....I will attach a short overview of the things to do according to me, maybe this helps you.
Thanks andyme. Indeed the FAQ concerning 4 versions will be very very helpful ( a sort of comparison table concering hardware: motor, controller and different compatibility like 13cell compatible or not, weight).

Here is an example of what would be helpful for me:
Capture d’écran 2018-12-07 à 08.40.08.png


Thanks for the attachment, I read your doc beforehand, and still (it may be my poor understanding) it was not clear to me which version to purchaise. Even your answer above seems to be contradicting :)

The reason I'm asking all that is that I'll run on stock firmware for some time before I'll upgrade to opensource. Two problems seems possible to me:
1) I burn some components using 36V kit with 13cell battery,
2) It will not work due to some protection (I have an impression that I read someone's post about that) and i'll be really forced to upgrade the firmware at the very beginning

Anyway thanks for answering beginners questions.
ok...generally spoken, and independently of the brand and the firmware, it seems to be a fact that all motors can be operated with all voltages. performance will vary, but nothing will break. This is what i have found as the bottom line of various similar questions on the internet. I personally have no experience with it, i have never attempted to do that.

my personal question would be: why would one buy a 36V motor if one owns a 48 V battery already...there may be some extravagant reasons, but as a rule of thumb i think it is safe to say that there are more advantages in a 48 V motor (more power, or same power with less current, less losses) than in 36 V motor. (according to some experts there may be cases or situations where a 36V motor has an adavantage over a 48V motor..i think this is more of theoretical nature and therefore i personally would not spend too much time thinking about this...)

if you want to read a bit and maybe get even more confused:

https://electricbikereview.com/forum/th ... eries.106/

i would not make too much of an issue out of it. my 2 cts. and if someone here has a strong opinion in favor of 36V, please speak up, AFAIK jbalat bike is 36V so maybe he wants to say something...

Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

Posted: Dec 07 2018 3:55am
by andyme
tomtom50 wrote:
Dec 07 2018 12:18am
andyme wrote:
Dec 05 2018 4:26pm
endlesscadence has asked me to write down some kind of "how to go about it". He meant to go over it and post it on the wiki, but i am afraid he is no longer active. at least i have not see him post here for 2 weeks or so.

So therefore i am attaching what i have so far, there may be some mistakes in a few details, but the main information should be ok
I've been planning to try the open source firmware for a while, thanks for writing this. Nicely written, too.

If you are interested as I do the upgrade I can add to your document and send it to you. If you like the additions you can re-post. Maybe others would like to participate as well. A bit like wikipedia.
definitely... everyone faces new and different challenges ... :D

Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

Posted: Dec 07 2018 4:34am
by crun
andyme wrote:
Dec 07 2018 3:50am
my personal question would be: why would one buy a 36V motor if one owns a 48 V battery already
I think the big issue would be your pedaling cadence. These motors don't produce much torque above modest pedal cadences. i.e. if you pedal fast, the motor stops helping. This gets worse as the battery goes flat. The stock firmware is pretty poor for this.

If you like to pedal fast, using a 36V motor with a 48V battery will still give torque at high cadence. A 48V motor will probably run out speed.

Remember that the difference between the two is not that great only 4:3 , so don't agonise about it.

i.e If I pedal at 60rpm cadence using a 48V motor +48V battery, then with a 36V motor+48V battery I could pedal 80rpm.

The 48V motor will produce more torque for the same power output, but at lower max pedalling speed.
andyme wrote:
Dec 07 2018 3:50am
but as a rule of thumb i think it is safe to say that there are more advantages in a 48 V motor (more power, or same power with less current, less losses) than in 36 V motor.
The power output (how fast you can climb a hill) is exactly the same for both motors. The choice is do you pedal fast or slow?

The efficiency of the motor itself is the same (36V motor may even be slightly better, if the measurements of 48V motor resistance was accurate), and exactly the same amount of battery power is used for the same amount of shaft power.

If you want very high powers (750W), then the 48V motor does allow more power from the controller circuit.

Bear in mind that this motor is a small motor with poor thermal design, and probably cannot be run at high powers for long, so "750W" probably means "for a brief burst". (The motor itself overheats at a mere 27W motor dissipation) [I have not run motors beyond 350W, so someone else can comment on how fast they overheat]

Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

Posted: Dec 07 2018 4:51am
by andyme
crun wrote:
Dec 07 2018 4:34am
andyme wrote:
Dec 07 2018 3:50am
my personal question would be: why would one buy a 36V motor if one owns a 48 V battery already
I think the big issue would be your pedaling cadence. These motors don't produce much torque above modest pedal cadences. i.e. if you pedal fast, the motor stops helping. This gets worse as the battery goes flat. The stock firmware is pretty poor for this.

If you like to pedal fast, using a 36V motor with a 48V battery will still give torque at high cadence. A 48V motor will probably run out speed.

Remember that the difference between the two is not that great only 4:3 , so don't agonise about it.

i.e If I pedal at 60rpm cadence using a 48V motor +48V battery, then with a 36V motor+48V battery I could pedal 80rpm.

The 48V motor will produce more torque for the same power output, but at lower max pedalling speed.
andyme wrote:
Dec 07 2018 3:50am
but as a rule of thumb i think it is safe to say that there are more advantages in a 48 V motor (more power, or same power with less current, less losses) than in 36 V motor.
The power output (how fast you can climb a hill) is exactly the same for both motors. The choice is do you pedal fast or slow?

The efficiency of the motor itself is the same (36V motor may even be slightly better, if the measurements of 48V motor resistance was accurate), and exactly the same amount of battery power is used for the same amount of shaft power.

If you want very high powers (750W), then the 48V motor does allow more power from the controller circuit.

Bear in mind that this motor is a small motor with poor thermal design, and probably cannot be run at high powers for long, so "750W" probably means "for a brief burst". (The motor itself overheats at a mere 27W motor dissipation) [I have not run motors beyond 350W, so someone else can comment on how fast they overheat]
crun: you know what? i think YOU are the right person to write all this into a table...pros and cons of the various combinations in a concise manner....what do you think? could you do this? i am sure this could be of great help for many users.

one thing i want to add though: for me, living on top of a rather steep hill, the max power is a topic. so i have readings up to 750 watts "all the time" but for only a couple of minutes. so: it really seems to depend alot on preferences and needs..if you could put this into a table or into a graph that withstands also critical examinations of other experts...it would be a big gain. also with real values e.g. re. cadence. what may be a "modest" value to you is maybe more than enough for someone else..etc..

Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

Posted: Dec 07 2018 6:55am
by jbalat
My reason for buying a 36v with 36v battery was to minimise weight. My dual suspension bike is only 17.5kg, my Trek Powerfly is more like 25kg and you can feel the difference.
If you are running stock then the 48v motor has more power, my friend always rides in level 2 and to keep up I had to ride in level 4, now with the Opensource firmware I can always beat him on the flat and up hills without trying very hard even if he uses level 4.
With Opensource I don’t think it matters so much what motor you get. Even at 36v I can still reach cadence up to 120rpm so in fact I don’t even need to run a higher voltage to get more cadence. I don’t think it matters which motor you buy, just get the cheapest one.

I top out around 675w with my voltage at 18amps, when you run this sort of power for a while the motor will overheat so make sure you install the temperature sensor too.

Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

Posted: Dec 07 2018 7:12am
by andyme
jbalat wrote:
Dec 07 2018 6:55am
My reason for buying a 36v with 36v battery was to minimise weight. My dual suspension bike is only 17.5kg, my Trek Powerfly is more like 25kg and you can feel the difference.
If you are running stock then the 48v motor has more power, my friend always rides in level 2 and to keep up I had to ride in level 4, now with the Opensource firmware I can always beat him on the flat and up hills without trying very hard even if he uses level 4.
With Opensource I don’t think it matters so much what motor you get. Even at 36v I can still reach cadence up to 120rpm so in fact I don’t even need to run a higher voltage to get more cadence. I don’t think it matters which motor you buy, just get the cheapest one.

I top out around 675w with my voltage at 18amps, when you run this sort of power for a while the motor will overheat so make sure you install the temperature sensor too.
very interesting...thanks for your reply, jabalat. so your friend has a stock tsdz2 with 48v correct?

Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

Posted: Dec 07 2018 2:05pm
by Bartman
Seems the KTLCD3 is not weatherproof after opening it up to installing the opensource firmware. I've been using mine for a few months now in rain and sunshine and it's been fine. I was always going to use electrical tape around the join to seal but never got round to it. Today the display would not switch on and the backlight was on when I went out to get my bike. I unplugged & plugged in the battery and the display came on with all the digits active like when you first flash it. So I opened it up to reflash it and water dribbled. out. I'll see if it dries out, and if not looks like I'll be ordering a new one.

Scottish Snow 1, KTLCD3 0
ktlcd3.jpg
ktlcd3.jpg (204.08 KiB) Viewed 587 times

Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

Posted: Dec 07 2018 3:08pm
by crun
Bartman wrote:
Dec 07 2018 2:05pm
So I opened it up to reflash it and water dribbled. out. I'll see if it dries out, and if not looks like I'll be ordering a new one.
Give the pcb a scrub with a toothbrush to clean any deposits that have formed off. (you can use clean water, its already wet) , paying special attention to the pins of the microprocessor. Then use meths/ethanol to wash off the water, again focus on making sure it goes under the micro to get the water there.

Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

Posted: Dec 07 2018 4:56pm
by valkus
crun wrote:
Dec 07 2018 4:34am
andyme wrote:
Dec 07 2018 3:50am
my personal question would be: why would one buy a 36V motor if one owns a 48 V battery already
I think the big issue would be your pedaling cadence. These motors don't produce much torque above modest pedal cadences. i.e. if you pedal fast, the motor stops helping. This gets worse as the battery goes flat. The stock firmware is pretty poor for this.

If you like to pedal fast, using a 36V motor with a 48V battery will still give torque at high cadence. A 48V motor will probably run out speed.

Remember that the difference between the two is not that great only 4:3 , so don't agonise about it.

i.e If I pedal at 60rpm cadence using a 48V motor +48V battery, then with a 36V motor+48V battery I could pedal 80rpm.

The 48V motor will produce more torque for the same power output, but at lower max pedalling speed.
andyme wrote:
Dec 07 2018 3:50am
but as a rule of thumb i think it is safe to say that there are more advantages in a 48 V motor (more power, or same power with less current, less losses) than in 36 V motor.
The power output (how fast you can climb a hill) is exactly the same for both motors. The choice is do you pedal fast or slow?

The efficiency of the motor itself is the same (36V motor may even be slightly better, if the measurements of 48V motor resistance was accurate), and exactly the same amount of battery power is used for the same amount of shaft power.

If you want very high powers (750W), then the 48V motor does allow more power from the controller circuit.

Bear in mind that this motor is a small motor with poor thermal design, and probably cannot be run at high powers for long, so "750W" probably means "for a brief burst". (The motor itself overheats at a mere 27W motor dissipation) [I have not run motors beyond 350W, so someone else can comment on how fast they overheat]
Crun, thanks a lot for this input. I'm not looking for power, rather for a reasonable level of assistance, so I do not sweat when I come to work. As a normal cyclist I like to keep my cadance high. (I still have to decide on the gearing of my bike with nexus 3 hub as I have for my commute 60% of flat and 40% of hills (100m climb) with gradients up to 12-15% (max))
Anyway if I understand correctly opensource firmware solves the problem of the poor assistance at hight pedaling cadance

Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

Posted: Dec 07 2018 5:01pm
by valkus
jbalat wrote:
Dec 07 2018 6:55am
My reason for buying a 36v with 36v battery was to minimise weight. My dual suspension bike is only 17.5kg, my Trek Powerfly is more like 25kg and you can feel the difference.
If you are running stock then the 48v motor has more power, my friend always rides in level 2 and to keep up I had to ride in level 4, now with the Opensource firmware I can always beat him on the flat and up hills without trying very hard even if he uses level 4.
With Opensource I don’t think it matters so much what motor you get. Even at 36v I can still reach cadence up to 120rpm so in fact I don’t even need to run a higher voltage to get more cadence. I don’t think it matters which motor you buy, just get the cheapest one.

I top out around 675w with my voltage at 18amps, when you run this sort of power for a while the motor will overheat so make sure you install the temperature sensor too.
Great piece of info for my decision making process :) Thanks a lot, indeed weight matters! I

Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

Posted: Dec 07 2018 10:59pm
by crun
valkus wrote:
Dec 07 2018 5:01pm
jbalat wrote:
Dec 07 2018 6:55am
My reason for buying a 36v with 36v battery was to minimise weight.
Great piece of info for my decision making process :) Thanks a lot, indeed weight matters! I
Probably not correct though,
(AFAIK) the motors are the same, just different windings, so same weight.
The battery can be the same weight for the same watt.hours energy capacity. e.g. 50 cells is the same weight regardless of how you arrange them into 36V or 48V batteries)

This time I got a 36V motor again, as I can use it with 36V or 48V batteries. I am not very interested in high power, but rather decent endurance.

BTW, if you change your mind or want to actually try both, spare motors are cheap enough at pswpower, simple to change.

Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

Posted: Dec 08 2018 4:15pm
by andyme
crun wrote:
Dec 07 2018 10:59pm
valkus wrote:
Dec 07 2018 5:01pm
jbalat wrote:
Dec 07 2018 6:55am
My reason for buying a 36v with 36v battery was to minimise weight.
Great piece of info for my decision making process :) Thanks a lot, indeed weight matters! I
Probably not correct though,
(AFAIK) the motors are the same, just different windings, so same weight.
The battery can be the same weight for the same watt.hours energy capacity. e.g. 50 cells is the same weight regardless of how you arrange them into 36V or 48V batteries)

This time I got a 36V motor again, as I can use it with 36V or 48V batteries. I am not very interested in high power, but rather decent endurance.

BTW, if you change your mind or want to actually try both, spare motors are cheap enough at pswpower, simple to change.

let's say you are happy with 3p10s but not with 2p13s...then you need to jump to 3p13s. so that would be 30 cells vs 39. hm. well.

Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

Posted: Dec 08 2018 6:46pm
by jbalat
Exactly Andy.. I like 14s but 14s2p is not enough and 14s3p would be way too heavy unless there are some better cells out there than the GA's ?

15s2p is tempting but will it blow the display ? And can you get a 15s bms to suit ?

It really depends if you want a heavy commuter or playful jump bike..

If you have a 48v motor then you have to run at least 13s but with a 36v you can run as low as 10s

Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

Posted: Dec 08 2018 7:13pm
by andyme
jbalat wrote:
Dec 08 2018 6:46pm
Exactly Andy.. I like 14s but 14s2p is not enough and 14s3p would be way too heavy unless there are some better cells out there than the GA's ?

15s2p is tempting but will it blow the display ? And can you get a 15s bms to suit ?

It really depends if you want a heavy commuter or playful jump bike..

If you have a 48v motor then you have to run at least 13s but with a 36v you can run as low as 10s
Yup...or like in my case: I was able to squeeze 26 cells into my frame and seat post, and there is no way I could get 2 more in...so: it all depends on your personal situation and preferences. I think it is just good to know what options exist in order to be able to make the smartest and best choice possible. Knowledge rocks! Or, as Einstein put it: the more I learn, the more I realize how much I don't know...

Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

Posted: Dec 08 2018 9:13pm
by tomtom50
andyme wrote:
Dec 08 2018 7:13pm
jbalat wrote:
Dec 08 2018 6:46pm
Exactly Andy.. I like 14s but 14s2p is not enough and 14s3p would be way too heavy unless there are some better cells out there than the GA's ?

15s2p is tempting but will it blow the display ? And can you get a 15s bms to suit ?

It really depends if you want a heavy commuter or playful jump bike..

If you have a 48v motor then you have to run at least 13s but with a 36v you can run as low as 10s
Yup...or like in my case: I was able to squeeze 26 cells into my frame and seat post, and there is no way I could get 2 more in...so: it all depends on your personal situation and preferences. I think it is just good to know what options exist in order to be able to make the smartest and best choice possible. Knowledge rocks! Or, as Einstein put it: the more I learn, the more I realize how much I don't know...
Are you guys building your own packs? GA cell 13S2P is hard to find. I almost had one custom built, but I already have a (heavy) 14S3P pack I can use on both bikes so it was hard to justify.

Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

Posted: Dec 08 2018 10:58pm
by andyme
[quote=tomtom50 post_id=1430428 time=1544321617
Are you guys building your own packs? GA cell 13S2P is hard to find. I almost had one custom built, but I already have a (heavy) 14S3P pack I can use on both bikes so it was hard to justify.
[/quote]

I do..I love the flexibility and you can save alot of money. The spot welder pays for itself right away.

Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

Posted: Dec 09 2018 3:40am
by Ron Paul's Blimp
Is this chain line too extreme?

https://imgur.com/a/NV6ny3Z

That's the stock TSDZ2 42T. I was planning on replacing it with a narrow-wide, but since the stock ring looks a bit dished inboard, the line would be even worse with a regular non-dished ring.

Also it feels like there's significantly more resistance when turning the cranks compared to the stock BB. I don't think it's due to the chain line since it feels like it's still there in the gears where the chain is straight.

Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

Posted: Dec 09 2018 2:33pm
by tomtom50
andyme wrote:
Dec 08 2018 10:58pm
[quote=tomtom50 post_id=1430428 time=1544321617
Are you guys building your own packs? GA cell 13S2P is hard to find. I almost had one custom built, but I already have a (heavy) 14S3P pack I can use on both bikes so it was hard to justify.
I do..I love the flexibility and you can save alot of money. The spot welder pays for itself right away.
[/quote]

It does seem like fun. I'm experimenting making a spot welder for the fun of it (capacitor bank). I'm not sure I'll make a battery, I have a perfectly serviceable 14S3P in a Hailong case, so I don't need one. But if the welder works well...

Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

Posted: Dec 09 2018 8:50pm
by Kisazul
jbalat wrote:
Dec 07 2018 6:55am
My reason for buying a 36v with 36v battery was to minimise weight. My dual suspension bike is only 17.5kg, my Trek Powerfly is more like 25kg and you can feel the difference.
If you are running stock then the 48v motor has more power, my friend always rides in level 2 and to keep up I had to ride in level 4, now with the Opensource firmware I can always beat him on the flat and up hills without trying very hard even if he uses level 4.
With Opensource I don’t think it matters so much what motor you get. Even at 36v I can still reach cadence up to 120rpm so in fact I don’t even need to run a higher voltage to get more cadence. I don’t think it matters which motor you buy, just get the cheapest one.

I top out around 675w with my voltage at 18amps, when you run this sort of power for a while the motor will overheat so make sure you install the temperature sensor too.
Hi jbalat. You wrote that your ebike weighs 17.5 kg. I doubt ... maybe the photo of your bike on the scales will dispel my doubts, but I am more inclined that the weight of your bike is about 19-21 kg. Motor weight tsdz2 about 4 kg with rods. The GA 10S3P battery weighs 50 * 30 grams + wiring + screen + and BMS = ~ 2 kg. It turns out that your bike weighs 17.5 -4 -2 = 11.5 kg. Good two suspension! Carbon owners envy :)

How to make Waterproof Open Source Firmware Cable

Posted: Dec 09 2018 9:54pm
by tomtom50
Here is a cable that:
  • Plugs into a standard TSDZ2 motor
  • Doesn't modify the stock setup, so the upgrade can be undone
  • Uses waterproof connectors
  • Plugs directly to the green 5-pin KT-LCD3 cable
  • Works with 8-wire (throttle) TSDZ2
You need two cables:
    Higo B8 This plugs into the TSDZ2
    I bought from https://www.e-bike-technologies.de/inde ... 8-h-detail
      "1 in 4" Waterproof cable. This cable has waterproof connectors for KT-LCD3, Two brake connectors, and a throttle connector
      I bought from http://www.topbikekit.com/1electric-bik ... p-523.html
      Can also be bought at
      https://www.ebay.com/itm/Ebike-Scooter- ... SwVHdarMXB
      https://www.aliexpress.com/store/produc ... 180ekVrzL4

      This cable is sold for KT controllers that have waterproof cables, so the KT-LCD3 connection is correct. Topbikekit also sells throttles, brake levers, and reed switch brake kits with matching waterproof connectors.

      That's it. Two cables, one splice. Waterproof connectors that take available throttles & brake equipment.

      Great TSDZ2 instructions are at
      https://github.com/OpenSource-EBike-fir ... 3-to-TSDZ2

      Here is the pinout and what wire to connect to what:
      1 in 4 Pinout.jpg
      Final Cable
      DSC00352 assembled cable.jpg
      Connections
      DSC00348 conductor connections 1 in 4 on left.JPG
      Let me know if I made a mistake. I had to test the throttle to get the throttle color match right.

      Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

      Posted: Dec 09 2018 10:38pm
      by jbalat
      Kisazul wrote:
      Dec 09 2018 8:50pm
      ...With that the weight of your bike is about 19-21 kg. Motor weight tsdz2 about 4 kg with rods. The GA 10S3P battery weighs 50 * 30 grams + wiring + screen + and BMS = ~ 2 kg. It turns out that your bike weighs 17.5 -4 -2 = 11.5 kg. Good two suspension! Carbon owners envy :)
      Dude you could be right, I'm just using some cheap luggage scales.

      Re: New "TSDZ2 Torque Sensor Central Motor"

      Posted: Dec 10 2018 1:18am
      by Kisazul
      jbalat wrote:
      Dec 09 2018 10:38pm
      Dude you could be right, I'm just using some cheap luggage scales.
      Yes, 19 kg is more suitable for 26 full suspension. I have about the same characteristics, but at 29 and 14S5P GA. It weighs 21 kg.
      https://m.pinkbike.com/product/norco/2009-Fluid-Two/