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rigid disk forks?

Posted: Jan 02 2013 3:59pm
by nonlineartom
I've been riding my 2012 Schwinn Panther for a year now and on the whole it's awesome, but V brakes on mucky winter roads are just rubbish, I burn through pads at an alarming rate and all the brake dust really soots up the frame and gums up the brakes. There is no easy way to add disk brakes to the frame, it does have 135mm dropouts, and the motor has a disc attachment but the aluminium frame can't really be modified.

Can anyone recommend a decent rigid front fork for a 26" wheel that has a disk mount that won't look horribly out of place on a swooopy beach cruiser?

Re: rigid disk forks?

Posted: Jan 02 2013 4:04pm
by Farfle
If your going rigid just because if the looks, check out the choppers us Springer fork.

Re: rigid disk forks?

Posted: Jan 02 2013 4:08pm
by TucsonTNT
Check out salmon kool stop pads. Best on the market that I know of.

Re: rigid disk forks?

Posted: Jan 02 2013 4:19pm
by nonlineartom
I wouldn't mind proper front suspension if it will fit, but I think it will make the front wheel too far back, not enough caster angle. I would love springer fork but they are near impossible to get in the UK and I haven't heard great things about the Monark fork.

Re: rigid disk forks?

Posted: Jan 02 2013 7:03pm
by amberwolf

Re: rigid disk forks?

Posted: Jan 02 2013 7:14pm
by neptronix
salmon kool stop pads are pretty good but nothing beats a big disc brake.

Surly sells some rigid disc forks, so do a few other companies. I'm pretty happy with my surly 1x1 but with a 203mm disc brake, and me being 250lbs, it does flex a little too much for my taste.

http://www.universalcycles.com/shopping ... tegory=703

Here is a company who sells a lot of the rigid disc forks out there.. they're based in Portland, OR i think.

Re: rigid disk forks?

Posted: Jan 02 2013 7:24pm
by chisixer6
Looking for a rigid disk fork? How 's $50 sound...


http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10 ... 1___202441

Re: rigid disk forks?

Posted: Jan 03 2013 12:34am
by ions82
I've seen a few different types of triple clamp "chopper" forks on eBay that have a disc tab. I bought one for a trike project I'm working on. It was cheap as chips, but I have no idea if anyone is selling them in the UK. It is actually well made and strong as houses, too. It might be worth looking into. It would definitely look right at home on a cruiser bike. Most of them that I've seen have chrome legs. The downside is that they aren't very light.

Re: rigid disk forks?

Posted: Jan 03 2013 3:43am
by sanford
Came across this site and fork, as I have been looking at front fork options for my Cruiser;
http://www.bigbikes.co/accessories/street-king-fork#1
They have some springer forks on there too, but not with disc mounts. Not many options for Cruiser bikes and accessories in the UK really.

Re: rigid disk forks?

Posted: Jan 03 2013 9:29am
by capo

Re: rigid disk forks?

Posted: Jan 03 2013 1:39pm
by nonlineartom
Thanks for all the great suggestion, triple clamp straight forks are pretty but not really practical as they don't have any rake on them so the front wheel would be too far back, they need to position the wheel far infront of the pivot point to maintain that super stable ride and maintain the wheelbase. I'll see if I can get a Surly rigid fork cheap in the UK it seems to keep the cruiser aesthetic with a slow steady sweep with a hefty IS disc mount. I have a BB7 spare so that's sorted.

I'll have to check the headset arrangement I guess because it's not like a mountain bike where the stem clamps onto the outside of the steerer it's a bar that fits inside the steerer, will this cause any problems?

Re: rigid disk forks?

Posted: Jan 03 2013 4:29pm
by amberwolf
then jsut make sure yuou get a threaded stem fork, not thraedless.

Re: rigid disk forks?

Posted: Jan 04 2013 4:15am
by ions82
nonlineartom wrote:Thanks for all the great suggestion, triple clamp straight forks are pretty but not really practical as they don't have any rake on them so the front wheel would be too far back, they need to position the wheel far infront of the pivot point to maintain that super stable ride and maintain the wheelbase.

The rake on a chopper fork is created by the offset of the triple clamps (the fork tubes are "ahead" of the steerer tube) as well as the dropouts being mounted in front of that. On most of those chopper forks, the tubes are extra long so that you can set it to whatever axle-to-crown height you need (also affecting rake and trail.) However, it's no guarantee that you'd be able to get the exact amount of trail that the original fork has. Still, it would probably be pretty close.