Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

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Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by amberwolf » Feb 17 2016 3:18am

I've had enough wierd problems in the last week with "cheap" bicycle-class tires and tubes, on the SB Cruiser trike, that I am finally switching to 16" moped tires for my 20" hubmotor wheels.

(see the SB Cruiser thread linked in my signature for details on the problems, in recent posts
https://endless-sphere.com/forums/viewt ... 2#p1153172 )

I planned to do it for a long time, but have not had the budget to do it, or other stuff came up to use up the budget I did have, after I found that there is nowhere local to walk in and buy them, and I'd have to add shipping cost to the tires. Now I have to buy new tires/tubes anyway, so I will just go ahead and get the moped ones, as I've found some free shipping ones.

After reading around ES, the choice seems to be between Pirelli ML-75, and Shinko SR-714. Probably the 2.25" version. Wider would fit, but I coudlnt' find the Shinko in anything wider, and the Pirellis generally seem to cost twice as much as the Shinkos, putting them out of the budget at $45-$50 each, vs $25-$30 each for Shinkos.
http://www.amazon.com/Shinko-SR714-Mope ... +inch+2.25
The rims I have are wide enough; the old ex-Zero MC rims Ypedal was selling here:
https://endless-sphere.com/forums/viewt ... 95#p761895
as I already have one on the right motor wheel, and will by next week sometime have one on the left motor wheel too.


I"ll need good tubes, too; what about these?
http://www.amazon.com/Kenda-636064A2-Mo ... JTFN7AGZSH

or these
http://www.amazon.com/BikeMaster-Tube-2 ... 4P30ZJKTZ8

or these
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00ZPFWFQW?psc=1

etc....and some have options for the 90-degree stems; would those be better than using the 90-degree adapters? (which I also need to get; any ideas on good ones?)



And a good patch kit for moped tubes (and tires, to patch from the inside)?


I also need new tire levers, as I've broken the last of the good plastic ones I had (which were at least a decade, maybe two, old). I expect metal ones will be better suited to the moped tires, if I end up needing them. I could use flatblade screwdrivers, but having levers dedicated to the purpose means I'm less likely to destroy something with the wrong tool, or destroy a tool by misusing it. :oops:

These Topeak levers
http://www.amazon.com/Topeak-Shuttle-Le ... ttle+lever
are probably not sufficient for moped beads/sidewalls, and probably not these either:
http://www.amazon.com/IceToolz-Steel-Ti ... ire+levers

but maybe these
http://www.amazon.com/Motion-Pro-08-005 ... JTFN7AGZSH
which are kinda long and heavy, though.

do y'all have any suggestions?

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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by Chalo » Feb 17 2016 3:33am

Odyssey Chase Hawk 20 x 2.4" tires have all the advantages of 16" moped tires without DOT tires' excessive weight, high rolling resistance, or difficulty in mounting.

If you're not using moped wheels, don't use moped tires.

At my shop, we sell and use Pedro's tire levers. Those are what I use to wrestle on 17" and 19" motocross tires, though it's still such difficult and time-consuming work that I have to charge triple what I charge to install normal bicycle tires.
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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by amberwolf » Feb 17 2016 4:12am

I'll have to look up those levers.

On the tires, it took a bit to find pressure specs for them, but here:
https://www.danscomp.com/products/44403 ... _Tire.html
they list them as 100psi max...which means that it's possible they'll end up like the other such high-pressure tires I've used: destroyed sidewalls/etc., when used at around half that pressure on a heavy trike / bike.

That's not something I want to risk, since the point of going for heavier-duty tires now is to make it a total non-worry (even though I will still carry a separate spare tire *and* two spare tubes, for a while at least, just in case).

What experiences have you had with running these at pressures around 50-60PSI on stuff as big/heavy as those pedicabs you've worked on? (and on wheels with high-torque drive, either pedal or motor, as I ahve found it makes a difference in how the sidewalls/bead last at significantly lower pressures than the tires were meant for, being twisted around by driving the vehicle along vs simply used to roll along with the wheel)

I'm guesstimating that at present the trike plus me and Tiny is on the order of 450-500lbs. I don't have three scales or I'd just measure it. :)


If the moped tires are heavier just because they're heavier, vs the bicycle tires, then it's not an attractive prospect.

If they're heavier because they have thicker tread and sidewalls, and more layers, and that all that makes them last longer and be more resistant to / tolerant of abuse and punctures, then I'm all for using them on this beast.

It also matters about the grip they have, because, as an example, the crappy Bell "slicks" I'd used just prior to the present disasters, were fairly grippy but not in the wet, at all, at least under braking, and that unfortunately made them wear quickly thru from the fast turns I sometimes have to make, and generally tend to make anyway (though not quite as fast as the ones I *have* to make to not get rear-ended).

But the knobby Cheng-Shin (CST) tires I had to put on after literally wearing holes in the Bells, they're not grippy at all, really, and I can slide the trike around the road by shifting weight, turning quickly, even just a lane change that's too quick can result in skidding the back end around (even with Tiny in the back, which is another 90-100lbs over the axles). While that's kinda fun under controlled conditions, it also means I cant' always truly control the trike under emergency conditions. :(

I've also used Maxxis Hookworms and Ringworms, and while they are ok in stickiness, they wear quickly and they're also meant for higher pressure (100PSI) and had problems from not running them anywhere near that level. I forget exactly what it was, but I'm sure there's a post or sevral about it in either the CrazyBike2 or SB Cruiser threads, somewhere.


IF the moped tires can be run even lower than the 50-60PSI and be safe from pinchflats, etc., that'd be nice as Tiny would have a slightly smoother ride, with less basketball-bouncing of the wheels on the rough roads.

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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by Chalo » Feb 17 2016 4:36am

The silly high pressures most BMX tires are rated for are unrelated to the pressures they operate best at. Since the '90s, BMXers associate high tire pressure ratings with quality. But the fatter the tire and the wider the rim, the lower the optimum pressure.

I mentioned the Chase Hawk model because it has a lot more rubber thickness than most, and a wider casing. I can think of no reason anyone should ever use 100psi in that tire. Those Zero motorcycle rims tend to split open at pressures much over 70 psi with fat tires, anyway.

With 500 pounds spread across three 20 x 2.4" tires, I'd go for about 60psi and adjust to accommodate surface conditions. If the front tire carries a lot less weight, maybe as low as 40 in that one. Both lower and higher than optimum pressure will accelerate tire wear.

Moped tires are thicker than even very thick BMX tires. So they'll wear longer and resist punctures better. But they'll also cost you speed, range, and ride quality, and they're harder to service. Only you can say whether they are a good match for your requirements.

Having tried 20 inch wheels on pedicabs for their size, strength, and weight advantages, I can tell you we're never doing that again. Ride quality suffers greatly compared to larger wheels, which we expected-- but tire wear and problems were an order of magnitude worse, which we didn't expect. We build our cabs with only 29 inch wheels now.
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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by amberwolf » Feb 17 2016 5:04am

Chalo wrote: I mentioned the Chase Hawk model because it has a lot more rubber thickness than most, and a wider casing. I can think of no reason anyone should ever use 100psi in that tire. Those Zero motorcycle rims tend to split open at pressures much over 70 psi with fat tires, anyway.
If I used much higher than what I do now (usually 50, up to 60 depending on the tire/tube; lots lower in front usually 40-45 or it just skids when braking on anything but perfect asphalt) then I'd probably bounce my way along rather than roll, anyway. :lol: With all the ridges across the road in some places, that already happens even at the pressures I have now.

With 500 pounds spread across three 20 x 2.4" tires, I'd go for about 60psi and adjust to accommodate surface conditions. If the front tire carries a lot less weight, maybe as low as 40 in that one. Both lower and higher than optimum pressure will accelerate tire wear.

It's actually 26" in front, 20" in back.
Image
If I could've easily built it to have 26" in back, I would have, but the stuff I had available and the short time to do it in while Dogman was here to help me meant the only realistic option was 20" rear, to get the deck low enough for it to perform the way it does (not very tippy, able to haul the dogs in the crate on the deck, etc) and still use the axle/etc I had for the pedal chainline, rather than the kluge I'd used on Delta Tripper.

I have ideas and probably parts to do it over again in 26", but I don't have time to do it anytime soon and still have a reliable daily dog-hauling commuter, which at this time is an absolute requirement with having to take Tiny and now also Yogi to work with me to keep an eye on them (between illness and injury on each) till they get better enough to be back on their own.

Moped tires are thicker than even very thick BMX tires. So they'll wear longer and resist punctures better. But they'll also cost you speed, range, and ride quality, and they're harder to service. Only you can say whether they are a good match for your requirements.


I guess I'll have to just try them and see. I once had some wide motorcycle tires (but no wheels for them) and those were quite thick and heavy; I'm sure the moped ones are not nearly so much so, but still moreso than the bicycle ones.

Since almost all of my riding is a short <5mile commute to and from work, 5 or more days a week, and that only uses about a quarter (or less) of my battery range for just one of the two batteries I can mount on the trike, I'm not as worried about the range loss.

Speed, well, I only go 20MPH or less anyway, as they don't allow more than that here in AZ. The motor system is capable of significantly more than that, though I don't know how much more in practical reality, so there is extra power to compensate for higher rolling resistance.

Ride quality...well, if it means I will be riding constantly without having to stop and fix tires/tubes, then that is better than my present problem, especially once summer comes, and especially when I have to have one or both of the dogs with me--stopping for 10-20+ minutes on the side of the road in 120F+ heat isnt much fun for me, but for the dogs it is really pretty bad, even in the shade of their crate/kennel with icepacks just under the padding they're laying on.


Servicing...if it means not having to service them nearly as often, I'm willing to live with harder to service when I do, probably, as long as it is still something I *can* do roadside. (or just carry a whole spare regular wheel to bolt in place of a problematic motor wheel, if not roadside serviceable).
Having tried 20 inch wheels on pedicabs for their size, strength, and weight advantages, I can tell you we're never doing that again. Ride quality suffers greatly compared to larger wheels, which we expected-- but tire wear and problems were an order of magnitude worse, which we didn't expect. We build our cabs with only 29 inch wheels now.
I guess that's something else to keep in mind when I build the next version of the trike, which will also be wider (not intended to fit thru a doorway, or bollards, like the SB Cruiser is) to accomodate both dogs on the trike without a trailer.

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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by motomech » Feb 17 2016 6:43am

There are many moped tires available and you have barely scratched the surface, but those Shinkos should be ok. They are rated to 90 mph, so they are probably as sturdy a tire as you can fit to those rims.
Although they have stiffer side-walls than bicycle tires, you do not need long and heavy motorcycle type tire irons. A pair of 8 inch "moped irons will be fine. Installing motorcycle tires, and to a lesser extent, moped tires, is not about brute force, but about technique.
And it's a different technique than bicycle tires.
First off, no hooking and sliding of levers to pull the tire on.
Start off by inflating the tube to straighten it out and then reduce the pressure so the tube fills the void, but does not push hard against the side walls.
Then, starting just to the side of the valve stem, place your knee there and work the tire on the rim as far as you can by hand.
At that point, install a lever to hold the bead there and from that point, use the other lever, take sm. "bites" toward the valve stem.
The tire bead must be down in the valley of the rim to allow it the pull the last bit of tire over the rim.
Use lots of soapy water.
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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by Eskimo » Feb 17 2016 10:56am

I am considering of changing back to bicycle rim and tire. 56mm cruiser rim with 3mm spokes might work.
After the first summer with moped tire i have very mixed feelings. Yes, it takes the beating. It just lasts. Won"t puncture. Air volume is huge, it cushions potholes very well.
Moped tire is like put it on&forget it.After countless punctures with bicycle tires it makes you smile here. Gravel? macadam? nails? glass? get outta here, there is not a scratch.
There are also plenty of downsides. It takes a man to put that thing around the rim by hand. Sweaty man. My tire really needed raw power to make it.
It is heavy as hell. My 21-inch expecially. 4,2kg. Inner tube is 600g. Laughable really. My rear wheel weighs 13,6kg. It"s like riding with a flywheel. Once you get it going on a flat, straight road it kinda smooths out your ride with that huge rolling mass but on urban rides it eats power. Velomobile feels like a train with it.
Steel tire levers. Big screwdrivers. Hammer.
You can really trust on it but it definitely does not give you that bicycle feel anymore.
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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by Thud » Feb 17 2016 11:52am

Amberwolf,
Next to Arlo1 I prolly have as many or more miles on Pirelli ml75's than most here.

They work fine & the rolling resistance will be negligible in your application.
the good news is you won't need any beefier tire irons for mounting them, they will slip on any bicycle rim with minimal effort.

if your going with a moped rim you'll want 2 of these:
http://www.jpcycles.com/product/246-264 ... aQodpjUJgw

Any moped tube will be 4x more durable than a bicycle rated one....(I buy the cheapest ones I can find) they will patch with a standard bicycle patch kit just fine.

I run mine between 17 & 25#s of pressure. they pedal fine.
say goodbye to flats.

oh yea, use lots of baby powder on the tube & inside the tire..it prevents rot.
get some......

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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by motomech » Feb 17 2016 3:17pm

Amberwolf is in Phoenix, nothing rots there, it desiccates :lol:

But many use a power to help prevent chaffing.

I guess Thud and I are in agreement on everything else and on second thought, the Shinko might be a little heavy.

Without being able to physicly handle various tires, you might want to look at tire weight, which would equate to the construction beefiness.

In the end, I suspect any moped tire will work.
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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by amberwolf » Feb 18 2016 3:27am

Thanks for all the info/replies so far--it's all useful info. :)

In order to be sure they get here before my time-off-work next week is over, I've gone ahead and ordered the Shinkos, and some tubes (including spares, just in case).

I've not ordered levers yet. The rims these will go on are the ex-Zero-MC rims from Ypedal; I don't know if they are bicycle rims or moped/motorcycle rims. Most bicycle tires just slip right on them, often not needing any levers except sometimes for the final little bit just before the last bit of bead goes over the edge. Have to see how the Shinkos do when I get them.




In a related question (thought experiment, sort of): I've got a fair number of assorted 20" bicycle rims, which are all pretty narrow. But I have some need of wider ones for the trailer for Yogi, to also run moped tires on that. I could get another pair of the same rims above, but for something that doesn't see the same kinds of sideloading that my trike does, I might have a kluge that would work.

If I use steel rims (I might have four), I could cut off one of the rim walls on each, then weld them together, and grind the center down so tubes won't "feel" lumps in the middle. Then lace them up as 36-spoke rims, just ignoring all the "outer" spoke holes, so that there is as much bracing angle as possible.

If I use aluminum rims (which I probably have at least four that are the same or close enough), I couldn't weld them so I'd have to bolt them together, probably with straps thru the unused spoke holes (again, the outer ones). on the hub-side surface of the rims, possibly epoxying/gluing the bolt heads to the inside surface (where the tube would go), so I could easily tighten them with the wheel assembled, if I ever had to. Again, cutting one of the sidewalls of the rim off on each rim, for the center where the tube will go.


Another possible option is to run "dualies", two regular bike wheels and tires side by side on the same axle. But this still leaves me with more potential for failure than with the moped tires, most likely. Less than with just one bicycle tire on each side, though. (cuz sure, I could carry spares, but the idea is to not ever have to stop and fix something in the heat or cold while the dogs sit there melting (they won't freeze! :lol: ).)


Whatever I build, it'll be done in the next week, so it can be used to haul Yogi back and forth with me to work until his leg is better or it's obvious it's not going to be helped by "crate-rest".


Same thing for the wheel/tire upgrades for the trike itself, since Tiny will be in that, and it'll be pulling Yogi in the trailer.

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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by motomech » Feb 18 2016 6:34am

You will need at least one metal lever. If the tire just "slips on", it's a poor fit and the tire can rotate(these are powered wheels, no?) If it seems likely the tire will move around the rim, leave the nut off the valve stem so it will be"sucked inside the wheel. Otherwise it will tear the tube.
Levers can be bought individually in any motorcycle store.

I susppose a machine shop could cut and join rims, but I would think that doing by hand would be very difficult to get them to roll true

Are there no motorcycle junk yards in Phoenix?
There are several here in Tucson, including the famous Star Cycle. The owner, Mick Frew is super layed back and let's you rummage around(rooting, we call it). For something like used moped wheels, as likely as not he would want something like $5 each.
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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by amberwolf » Feb 18 2016 2:33pm

Because of all the various problems with getting used parts (or much of anything locally), I'd ended up deciding to buy new and/or use what I already have, mostly the latter due to costs.

I've been told about a place like that down there before, but getting to and from Tucson (anywhere outside the Valley, really) is a problem.

If I could recharge several places on the way, and have no tire problems on the way there, and don't get run over by anyone on the highway, then I could get there in a couple of days. The catch is that if I go anywhere more than half a day away, I have to take the dogs with me (Tiny at the least) for meds and special feeding. This gets pretty complicated, so I haven't even attempted it, as it would require a guarantee of charging stations and good (cooler) weather for the duration of the trip. I'd also need a second trailer attached to the first so I could haul back the stuff I get, as there would be no room on the trike and trailer due to the dogs and stuff. I could use a generator on a trailer to deal with the recharging, but I'd have to borrow the generator from someone.

I've put a lot of thought into trips like this, after having seen others do similar things...but time off work to prepare and then actually do the trip just isn't in the cards, even if everything else works out.


If there are any junkyards like that in the valley, I havent' foudn them--stopped even looking some time back. There are sometimes a few motorcycle parts in car junkyards, but often the poeple running the yards want prices almost as high or even higher than new for the bits, and are not nice people, so I haven't been back to any of htem in years. Pick-a-part was the "best" of them and they charged a fee just to get in, even if you didn't end up finding anything you could use, which means it was usually a waste of money and time.


I've found people selling or even giving away the parts I need, but when I have contacted them and we agreed on time/etc to meet then either they werent' there, or they had already sold or given away whatever it was, or had changed their mind and decided not to. I stopped trying after a bunch of this happening.

Motorcycle parts shops generally won't even acknowledge I am present, or help me in any way, possibly because I did not ride in on a motorcycle. When they do talk to me, they wont' help me, because I cant give them a model number and year, etc. They don't want to sell parts for projects like mine, AFAICT. (but they won't talk to me to tell me why). Most wont' even answer their phones, or when they do they put me on eternal hold. SOme of them post hours they will be open, but arent' actually there during those hours when I go. I gave up some time ago even trying. (though I tried again after the fire, I quickly gave up again after running into the same problems).

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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by motomech » Feb 18 2016 5:10pm

80cc MX bikes use a 17 inch frt. whl.
Lite as a feather and strong as a suspension bridge.

Ebay could be your friend

http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/2014715526 ... ps&lpid=82

Noped and moped wheels too.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/1978-Honda-NC50 ... 7a&vxp=mtr
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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by ddk » Feb 18 2016 10:04pm

amberwolf wrote:...the Pirellis generally seem to cost twice as much as the Shinkos, putting them out of the budget at $45-$50 each, vs $25-$30 each for Shinkos.
http://www.amazon.com/Shinko-SR714-Mope ... +inch+2.25
...
The Shinko is about $10 cheaper than a Marathon+ and I also considered using them... alas my fenders wouldn't fit with them so I'll just stick with the Hookworms.
Lucky me, the Hookworms have given me no real problems on the rear tires other than 2 sets in 4 years and one flat (caused by a valve stem). OTOH a Hookworm used for the front 16" gave me pinch flats. It took me several months to realize this... after going though a tire per week. I'm kinda slow some times.
Bell tires worked great, except they wear out quickly and are only available locally as knobbys (and I hates knobbys)
I recently replaced a worn out Bell with a Marathon+ ($33) :shock: where I'm hoping for twice the range (Bell tire cost ~$16). So far the Marathon+ hasn't caused any pinch flats.
But it shore sucks weight outta the wallet.
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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by amberwolf » Feb 19 2016 3:08am

motomech wrote:80cc MX bikes use a 17 inch frt. whl.
Lite as a feather and strong as a suspension bridge.
I have motorcycle wheels (with disc brakes) from a 1980's Suzuki somethingorother dirtbike, though they aren't what I'd call light by any means, and I have considered a super-duty cargo trike using one as the front wheel, or a bike with them as the wheels.

But all they have on them are knobbies, and I didn't want to also have to buy a tire for them, so I was planning on cutting off the knobbies...even without them the tire would be better than bicycle tires. :lol:

(in the case of the bike, actually using the motorcycle frame cut up to make a CrazyBike2-style bike but using the MC parts, as I have most of the bike except hte engine).

Ebay could be your friend
<snip>
Yeah, I've looked around there before, but for the most part they are too expensive. (I don't even really ahve the budget for the tires/tubes I'm getting now, but I have to buy something, so I might as well spend less and get a better (longer-lasting) tire in the process. A bicycle tire doesnt' even last two-three months so far, so hopefully these will last at least a year at a time, two or three would be good but not expected).


The really cheap ones I find either have shipping costs that are exorbitant, or they are from a seller I see a reason to mistrust (and I can't simply trust ebay to resolve any problems, and I can't afford to lose the money). It's been a long while since I've checked, so things may have changed--but based on the two links you posted, it doesn't look like it.


(I used to trust most people; nowadays I trust few, especially with my money, because too many things have happened over the years, and I can't afford mistakes like that--I waste enough money on my own on false branch paths. :oops: )

ddk wrote: The Shinko is about $10 cheaper than a Marathon+ and I also considered using them... alas my fenders wouldn't fit with them so I'll just stick with the Hookworms.
Thankfully if I have a fender fit problem, I can just rebuild the fenders to fix that. ;)



Lucky me, the Hookworms have given me no real problems on the rear tires other than 2 sets in 4 years and one flat (caused by a valve stem).
The problem I ran into was some sort of sidewall issue; I dont' remember the details but I think I was eitehr still at the apartment, so sometime in the last half of 2013, or just back at the house, early 2014, so the posts in that time should have the info in my CrazyBIke2 thread if I remember to go search. :)

But it was a good tire, other than that, and I pretty much wore it out on CB2, IIRC.

Same thing with a Ringworm, although I don't think those were quite as grippy. (i'd bought a pair for Tiny's trailer, but ended up having to use one on the bike and then used the second on there too, whcih is still on there now.)



Cost of tires vs lifetime is a real big problem on the trike...the front tire is still perfectly fine, and will probably last me years at this rate (same for CB2, same tire CST "City" something or other). But the rear tires wear super fast from the turning scrub and skidding. (and possibly misalignment, but I am pretty sure that part is ok, if not perfect).

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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by amberwolf » Feb 20 2016 9:59pm

Tires arrived, rim and tubes still on their way:
https://endless-sphere.com/forums/viewt ... 8#p1154498
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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by amberwolf » Feb 20 2016 11:30pm

Realized I missed replying to these parts:
motomech wrote:You will need at least one metal lever.
I've got flatblade screwdrivers and files to round them into safe-to-use-shapes, if I have to. I also have LOTS of various-length 5/8" wrenches that I could cut an end off of to turn into levers (since their steel ought to be hard enough), if I have to. (it's a common size to find along the roadside).
If the tire just "slips on", it's a poor fit and the tire can rotate(these are powered wheels, no?) If it seems likely the tire will move around the rim, leave the nut off the valve stem so it will be"sucked inside the wheel. Otherwise it will tear the tube.
It'll prbably tear the tube or the stem anyway, as it gets pulled down into the tire away from the rim, as that's what has happened on bicycle tubes in the cases where I had insufficent pressure (slow leaks, flats that I had to ride on anyway, etc). Just ripped the stem right off inside the tire (or in one case before it got sucked in that far, so it was lost completely somewhere along the path). :(

All the bicycle tires I've used on these ex-Zero rims fit on them pretty easily, sometiems without any levers at all, just by manipulating things right, if the sidewalls aren't too stiff.

Would gluing the tire to the rim with something like dabs of silicone help to prevent that rotation, given that these are motor wheels with most of the trike weight on them?


Levers can be bought individually in any motorcycle store.
If I need them I'll have to order them online, as those stores are useless around here. (or were when I last tried any of them, which has been a while). So far only the riding gear stores are helpful or wish to sell me anything.



I susppose a machine shop could cut and join rims, but I would think that doing by hand would be very difficult to get them to roll true
I guess if I run into the time to do it, I can try the experiment and see what happens. :) I don't have the money option to have a shop do it; if I did I'd just buy new moped or motorcycle-class rims cuz I'm sure that would be way way cheaper than paying people to modify crappy bicycle rims in stupid ways. :lol:

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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by amberwolf » Feb 22 2016 2:13pm

rims arrived:
https://endless-sphere.com/forums/viewt ... 0#p1155200

Now I am just waiting for the new tubes to arrive to be able to install the Shinkos, once I lace the new better rim onto the left wheel. I'll stil test fit the tire onto the rim, though, to see if I need to make or uy levers.

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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by amberwolf » Feb 22 2016 8:12pm

Rim now laced, tire is test fit:
https://endless-sphere.com/forums/viewt ... 3#p1155333
Image
The Shinko was pretty easy to get on, using just one regular flatblade screwdriver. I think if my fingers worked right without hurting knuckles, I could probably get it on there without a lever, with a lot of pushing/pulling/squeezing (it doesnt' just slip on there though).

(presently just a bicycle tube at 15-16PSI, just to seat the bead on the tire into the rim).

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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by ddk » Feb 23 2016 9:18pm

don't know if you acquired right angle valve extensions yet.
These things from ama zon are like, $5 cheaper than the last set I bought at an RV shop.
"How can we play Hot Wheels without lighter fluid? " -Serge

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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by amberwolf » Feb 24 2016 1:26pm

Not yet--so far nobody here that knows what they are has any or knows when they'll get more, and most places I've asked don't even know what they are.

I guess those are as good as anything I might find locally.

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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by amberwolf » Feb 25 2016 7:00pm

Tubes arrived, but are way way too small a size, definitely not the correct ones ordered. Dealing with that over here:
https://endless-sphere.com/forums/viewt ... 1#p1158291

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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by amberwolf » Feb 27 2016 11:00pm

Got the tubes, installed the tires and the valve extensions, rides good so far:
https://endless-sphere.com/forums/viewt ... 1#p1158941
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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by ddk » Mar 01 2016 1:42am

Nice looking trailer (from a distance... I've seen yer welds before LOL)
needs a teardrop body for that 'style' thang (j/k)
(not that I'm into 'style' things... 'cepting lowrider trikes and popemobiles)

I should'a knocked on wood before writing about the hookworms I use on the rear tires, since suddenly they have about 10 miles of wear left (forgot to air them up... 5lbs of pressure makes for a quickly worn tire. Actually I didn't forget... just everything's become a real effort to do anymore including checking tire pressures)

Because of that aforementioned thing, I chose to purchase Chalo's tire recommendation for the rears because unlike some of his opinions, his bike information is pretty spot-on (and I just replaced the front tire with that Marathon green-thingy, which, so far so good as in, no pinch flats but it "shore is a skinny lil' thang")
I ordered 'orange' ones because... why not?
Hoping they're slightly easier to mount than the hookworms and wear a little longer ...dependent, of course, on my diligence in maintaining proper tire pressures.
"How can we play Hot Wheels without lighter fluid? " -Serge

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Re: Tire levers, moped tires, and tubes

Post by amberwolf » Mar 14 2016 1:04am

These Shinko tires are a much better ride than the bike tires I've used on it so far. See here:
https://endless-sphere.com/forums/viewt ... 6#p1163856


ddk wrote:Nice looking trailer (from a distance... I've seen yer welds before LOL)
Yeah...it's not my best work, either, was in a hurry. :)
needs a teardrop body for that 'style' thang (j/k)
(not that I'm into 'style' things... 'cepting lowrider trikes and popemobiles)
If I was on long enough trips that aero was a major factor in my power usage, I probably would be making fairings for stuff...but I have to stop and start so often that it GREATLY dominates the power usage, enough that aero doesn't really matter in everyday riding.

I bet it would make a difference on long trips like when I worked at the store on the east side of town, where there are not many stops and starts.



Because of that aforementioned thing, I chose to purchase Chalo's tire recommendation for the rears because unlike some of his opinions, his bike information is pretty spot-on (and I just replaced the front tire with that Marathon green-thingy, which, so far so good as in, no pinch flats but it "shore is a skinny lil' thang")
I ordered 'orange' ones because... why not?
Hoping they're slightly easier to mount than the hookworms and wear a little longer ...dependent, of course, on my diligence in maintaining proper tire pressures.
I was very interested in those tires (and I also like the orange ones)...but given the costs, I was much more inclined to go with the Shinkos *because* of their thickness (despite weight).

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