Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

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k2orbust   1 mW

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Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by k2orbust » Dec 30 2020 1:35am

Long time lurker, first time poster. Here I will track progress on electrifying, and eventually solar-izing, a new Nazca Pioneer recumbent bike.

Background
My first ebike (2009) was a Stokemonkey kit on an Xtracycle longtail bike. It's still a good grocery getter and airport shuttle with insane climbing torque, but it's showing its age and gets appalling mileage--32 Wh/mile for a top speed around 21 mph.
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My f̶i̶r̶s̶t̶ second recumbent (2010) was this Easy Racers Tour Easy I got for a coast-to-coast bike tour. The trip was cut short due to injury, but it's still my workout bike and I take it on occasional weekend trips.
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Inspiration
Early this year I stumbled across the documentary of the 2018 Sun Trip race from France to China (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P1LB0jPh7QQ) Studying the entrants, I was most taken by the twin 26" bike of Mickael Joguet. A solar canopy makes perfect sense in sunny California where I reside. I got to work studying motor and solar panel options, but the project lay dormant through summer and fall.
Mickael Joguet 2018.jpg
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Design goals
The full vision is to make something to ride to South America and points beyond, but a year+ tour is not in the near future. In the mean time, this project could also replace a car on my 30 mile round trip commute--assuming we ever go back to working in offices after the pandemic. 30 miles at 30 mph is the second design target. This requires more motor power and more battery capacity than a pure solar tourer would, but it's a much closer and more concrete goal.

Here mission creep starts to set in. The most famous climb around San Jose is Mount Hamilton, reached by a 19 mile road at a steady 6% grade. But the real killer is the backside of the mountain, which climbs 1900 feet in 4.2 miles (8.6% average grade). I'd like to be able to cross the mountain in either direction without overheating or running out of juice.
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Unlike Mickael Joguet, I plan to omit the trailer and let the solar panels overhang the bike, like Michel Olchewsky's 2019 Sun Trip entry. The weight savings seem too great to pass up! I'm a mechanical engineer by day, so I already have some fanciful ideas to pivot the panels and possibly even stow one over the other for tight quarters maneuvering (or windy days). But that is all for later.
Michel Olchewsky 2019.jpg
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Finally I'll make the bike as dirt-friendly as a recumbent can be, for non-technical fire roads and such.

Design resources
The design tools at ebikes.ca have been invaluable for evaluating the motor, motor controller, and battery options, as are Justin's YouTube videos. (e.g. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dxJe_gygRGU)

Mark of solarE.bike has also done a great job blazing a trail and sharing what he has learned.

Parts in hand
I lost steam on this project over the summer, but was jolted back into activity when I learned Nazca Ligfietsen was winding down (leaving the Quetzal tandem as their only production model). Dutch twin big wheeled touring recumbents seem to be an endangered species! The AZUB Max is the easiest similar bike to get in the USA, but the price is not good and they don't do aero handlebars. I missed the last of the Gaucho framesets, but was able to get my hands on the apple green Pioneer you see here. (Stand-in wheels for show, from another bike.) Compared to the newer Gaucho model, the Pioneer is limited to now-unfashionable 26" tires and doesn't break down as small for shipping. Then again, the price was right for what is regarded as a quality product.
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Solar panels should rightly be the last thing to buy, but when I came across these Lightleaf rigid panels as surplus with no setup cost I snapped them right up. (Thanks to solarEbike for tipping me off to this vendor!) I think these are the same panels they make for teardrop trailers: https://droplet-trailer.com/product/solar-panel/ The curvature is a little excessive for my taste, but it helps make them hecka rigid, so much that I plan to use them as load-bearing elements in the solar canopy. Is the curvature why they are only rated 150 W vs. 170 W for the SunPower 6x8 flexible panel? More likely just lower-binned cells.

6x8 SunPower cells, ~8.5 lb each including 4 feet of 14 gauge wire:
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Construction is polycarbonate in front of the cells, and carbon fiber with some kind of epoxy foam behind.
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The next post will detail the parts that are not in hand, and the choices I'm still puzzling through. Hopes are to be up and running by springtime.
Last edited by k2orbust on Jan 22 2021 10:07pm, edited 1 time in total.

Warren   100 kW

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Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by Warren » Dec 30 2020 10:29am

Welcome aboard! Not nearly enough recumbents on here. I will be very interested in seeing your progress.

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k2orbust   1 mW

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Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by k2orbust » Jan 02 2021 6:10pm

More on component selection.

Plan of record
Battery - some flavor of 52V downtube battery
Motor controller - GRIN baserunner L10
Motor - GRIN All Axle hub motor or GMAC geared hub motor
Rims - Ryde Andra 35? Velocity Cliffhanger?
Tires - Some flavor of Schwalbe, 47-55 mm wide
Torque/cadence sensor - ERider torque sensing bottom bracket
Gearhub - Rohloff 500/14 or 1x12 derailleur
Brakes - Shimano SLX M7100, 180 mm rotors
Suspension fork - Manitou Markhor

I started by spending a lot of time with the GRIN motor simulator. Using the Run Simulation Set feature, I was able to produce pretty MATLAB plots like these. (Common parameters except where noted: 52V 13Ah downtube battery, Baserunner Z9 controller, 120 kg total weight, semi-recumbent air resistance, 75 W human power)
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Motor Simulator Plots 20201231.xlsx
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The conclusion, perhaps unsurprising, is that direct drive motors are more efficient on the flat, but fall behind geared hub motors as hills approach 4%. (This project is destined for a lot of open road, so I didn't consider mid-drive kits too closely.)

The two motor finalists are the GRIN All Axle motor (standard wind) and the GMAC geared hub motor (10T wind). Here they are compared on my test hill, the backside of Mt. Hamilton. It looks like both motors are up to the task! The GMAC runs warmer but uses significantly less energy overall, and has greater regen potential on the descent as well. The Z9 Baserunner controller, however, limits performance on the steepest sections and sets up the motors to run hotter. The L10 version looks like the way to go.
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Mt Ham GMAC L10.png
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Mt Ham GMAC Z9.png
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The All Axle motor only fits front wheels and the GMAC only fits back wheels, so the motor decision gets tangled up with geartrain selection. I've coveted a Rohloff gearhub for years, but it has stiff competition from the latest generation of 1x12 derailleur systems. I'm assuming the GMAC can't be retrofitted with a Micro Spline freehub, which means the smallest cog it fits would be 11 teeth. Three motor/geartrain options would be:
  • All Axle motor with Rohloff gearhub, 526% range, 5.9 kg, ~$1950
  • All Axle motor with Shimano 1x12 derailleur, 510% range, 5.2 kg, ~$1160
  • GMAC motor with Shimano 1x12 derailleur and Garbaruk 11-52 tooth cassette, 473% range, 4.8 kg, ~$870
The plan is to mount a torque-sensing crankset for power control, but high gearing would be called for in order to spin a reasonable cadence at 30 mph. That in turn means a lowest gear of at least than 21 gear inches, not ideal for climbing hills if the battery ever runs out. Better not ever let the battery run out!!! I'm still totally waffling here, trying to predict how the bike will really be used. Most roads most places are pretty flat, but the rear-drive GMAC would be better for riding the fire roads around here.

It looks tricky to mount a downtube battery on the Nazca Pioneer. It would fit on the rear rack nicely, but up and back is the worst location from a weight balance point of view. With a little fabrication it looks like the battery could fit under the frame and between the wheels, but it has to overlap the rear suspension pivot without impeding its movement. SolarEbike's most recent post (https://solare.bike/2020/12/27/designin ... lar-ebike/) is super pertinent to this project, so I need to do some homework on maximum charging amps for the different Panasonic and Samsung cells that are out there or I could end up with regrets.

For tires, a purely solar tourer would want skinny tires for efficiency. The higher speeds I'm looking at for commuting (as well as dirt road aspirations) advocate for wider tires up to the 50 mm max the frame can fit, though. The stock rigid fork can only handle a 160 mm brake rotor, but if I swap in the Manitou Markhor suspension fork then 180 mm rotors are possible. At the same time, that fork would let me cheat the max tire width up to ~55 mm. I wonder how much rolling resistance Schwalbe's new Pick-Up tire has... (https://www.schwalbetires.com/bike_tire ... es/pick-up) Full suspension might also reduce wear and tear on the solar canopy structure--or that's what I'm telling myself to justify the upgrade :wink:

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Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by Warren » Jan 02 2021 6:53pm

Small DD motors in big wheels are not a good idea. Here is what I have been considering to replace my 350 watt MAC mid-drive, which is down after 30K miles, with a failed freewheel in the planetary gearset.

I have a new 559 mm (26") rear wheel with a rim brake compatible rim, and a disc compatible hub. I am thinking of mounting a fast wind DD hub under the seat with a 15 or 16 tooth Velo Cog on the disc mount to a 22 tooth Velo Cog on the rear wheel. I get the advantage of a DD in a small wheel, without the added wheel weight, and extra hassle of dealing with wiring, when I change a flat.

https://www.velosolo.co.uk/faq.html

I think you will find that the Grin motor is a lot more efficient climbing when it is geared down.

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k2orbust   1 mW

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Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by k2orbust » Jan 02 2021 8:12pm

Aha, a mid drive setup with a jack shaft. I certainly agree the GRIN motor performs better with a 20" wheel or a gear reduction as you suggest! The chain line would get real ugly adapting that to the Nazca Pioneer frame, though. I'm pretty committed to the twin 26" layout.
pioneer mid drive.jpg
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A second jack shaft near the steerer tube (three separate chains!) might work better than what I sketched above.
Last edited by k2orbust on Jan 03 2021 1:22am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by amberwolf » Jan 02 2021 9:12pm

The All Axle motor only fits front wheels and the GMAC only fits back wheels, so the motor decision gets tangled up with geartrain selection.
That depends. You can use a fatbike fork (or anyway, one with the required dropout width, like some FWD bents have used with derailer/gearclusters on the front wheel directly down from the cranks) to use most rear motors on the front.

The AA motor could certainly be used on a rear, as long as you make the proper hardware "axle" to mount it on, including whatever adapter is needed to mount a freewheel or gear cluster on it. (even if it is single speed, and you use a mid-mounted jackshaft for gearcluster or IGH, etc., to get the right gearset for the pedal drivetrain).

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Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by Warren » Jan 03 2021 11:11pm

k2orbust wrote:
Jan 02 2021 8:12pm
Aha, a mid drive setup with a jack shaft.
I was actually suggesting the motor drive the left side of the rear wheel, not through the gears. That way you can run more power without wrecking the bicycle freewheel, and still have regen. That rear swingarm looks long enough that you could mount it below, and on, the swingarm, eliminating the problem of changing chainline tension without going through a derailleur.

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k2orbust   1 mW

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Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by k2orbust » Jan 04 2021 1:35am

Warren wrote:
Jan 02 2021 6:53pm
with a 15 or 16 tooth Velo Cog on the disc mount to a 22 tooth Velo Cog on the rear wheel
Sorry, didn't get that the first time. Then you'll use a rim brake on the rear wheel. Ingenious!

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Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by Peterfr12 » Jan 05 2021 4:28pm

Hi k2orbust,
I have a Pioneer Nazca bike that I convert to electric easily with a rear hub Mac motor. You are not the first one and it is a great frame to work on. The steel frame is combined with a 24-inch suspended fork made of alloy. I then added the following components, which most of them were scavenged from my first ebike diamond frame built.

Components:
Back wheel with SKS mudguard: Mac 8t motor laced to a 26-inch Halo SAS rim 36 holes. The rim is very strong stronger than the Alex one sold by Em3ev
Back tyre: Schwalbe marathon GT365 26-inch 2 inch wide
Front wheel with SKS mudguard: 24-inch Halo rim laced to a Shimano XT hub
Front tyre: Schwalbe marathon plus 24-inch 1.75 wide
Front brake: 180 mm disk with Trp hybrid calliper. The manufacturer of the fork mentions 160 mm max but I went a little over without any issues.
Rear brake: Vbrake with Koolstop brake pad. I could not fix a disk brake as there was not enough room for the calliper. I would have to shave some metal on the mac motor or stretch the frame and add a washer.
56t - 48t chainring with a 7 speed freewheel from Em3ev (11-32) so I can peddle easily at 35 mph. the 56t is from SJS cycles UK. I never used the 48t.
Two Ebrakes from ebikes.ca
58V 27AH battery from Em3ev as well as the 12 FET controller
Cycle analyst
ABS moulded box, IP54, 126 x 65 x 40mm from RS Component
DC-DC converter, 36-72Vin, 12Vdc 4.2A from RS Component
Motorcycle Headlight Shin Yo Grooved ABS Plastic with a 12V 35/35W HS1 bulb
12V Automotive horn and side mirror
A 24-60 V rear light with turning signal plugged directly into the battery
XT90 parallel harness
After painting the ABS box in black after adding a grey primer, I drilled several holes to it and I screwed it directly to the side rack of the recumbent. This box holds the battery, the controller (screwed onto the top of the box) and the DC – DC converter screw on the bottom side. The box is well tight, and nothing has cracked or moved after 6000 miles. All the electric cables are run through a pipe to protect from dust, water projection, etc. The pipe is attached to the frame using cable ties and bent with a heat gun to follow the curve of the frame. The centre of gravity is low and therefore the bike is very stable.
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Riding the bike: the good things
It was the perfect solution to solve my health problems. I can ride 300 miles a week without any pain anywhere and feel fresh. The main issue with recumbent is starting and going uphill. Adding a motor alleviates all these issues. I feel very safe as I have the same height as a car and the view is great. It took me less than 20 min to learn how to use a recumbent and after a day I was proficient. I can cycle with 20 kg of grocery without any issues of stability thanks to a very low centre of gravity. Downhill I can reach 45 mph easily without peddling and with the throttle OFF and I feel very confident at these speeds. I was using extensively my bike and I wanted something very reliable. I can peddle at 35 mph.

Issues with the current setup and upgrades for 2021
The issues after 10 000km and the solutions
The Mac clutch failed after 6000 km. I changed it myself. Mac motor is good for 35 mph but get hot after 25 miles trip, close to 90 C. The brake pads and the tyre – Schwalbe Marathon - get worn very quickly after 3000 miles. With a recumbent you are much faster, particularly downhill, it is a rocket so the brake pads get worn very fast.
SOLUTION: upgrade to 19 inch motorbike/rim tires for safety at high speed and for better longevity with a direct drive hub motor for regen so maybe GMAC is a good idea as you have regen. I swapped my 24” fork with a 26 single crown one able to accommodate a 20 mm hub. I had to lengthen the frame to accommodate the wider tyre: it was a pain to design but it is working. I built a massive triangle box that will hold a 20s16p homemade battery.
e-recumbent PBr.jpg
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k2orbust   1 mW

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Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by k2orbust » Jan 09 2021 6:04pm

Thanks for sharing your experience, Peterfr12! It's reassuring to know others have gone before :-) They say regen saves a ton of brake wear, so that is something we can look forward to.

Did mounting the battery to one side effect handling noticeably? I still haven't figured out what to do for the battery, but I have less appetite for fabrication than you clearly possess.

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Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by Warren » Jan 10 2021 10:04pm

k2orbust wrote:
Jan 09 2021 6:04pm
They say regen saves a ton of brake wear, so that is something we can look forward to.
I have 29K miles on my DD cargo bike. I am still on the original brake pads! The regen drops out below 12 mph, at which point I usually coast ten feet, and then tap the brakes to put my feet down.

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k2orbust   1 mW

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Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by k2orbust » Jan 11 2021 10:38pm

omg I ordered the GRIN Tech bits! GMAC motor (10T), Baserunner L10 controller, Cycle Analyst 3, ERider torque sensing bottom bracket, and assorted handlebar controls. Still to go: battery, fork, brakes, gears, rims, tires.

There's no doubt a mid drive setup would get more performance out of the motor, but the simplicity of a hub motor won out in the end.

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Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by Peterfr12 » Jan 12 2021 5:42pm

Hi k2orbust, Hi Warren

the Nazca is a really good frame to work on. however you might have issue to mount disk brake on the rear wheel. in my case there was not enough room with the mac 8t motor. so I use V brake for the rear wheel but disk brake for the front one.

mounting the battery on one side did not affect at all the balance of the bike (battery +box + controller + DC/DC was ~9 kg). i can ride the bike with one hand. I usually always have a panier on the other side with my laptop when I work or groceries when I am back from the shop.

Thanks Warren for your comment on regen. impressive. once you taste a recumbent you dont want to go back to diamond frame bike and you will enjoy it so much that i prefer riding it than driving a car.

k2orbust, i dont know if you are going to use a suspension fork. nazca frame did not come with one but I used a cheap one initially (£80) and now I upgraded to a manitou one with axle trough. With speed higher than 25 mph I recommend to have suspension for safety purpose.

all the best for your build. i shall open my own topic on my build later.

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k2orbust   1 mW

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Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by k2orbust » Jan 13 2021 1:51am

Peterfr12 wrote:
Jan 12 2021 5:42pm
in my case there was not enough room with the mac 8t motor. so I use V brake for the rear wheel but disk brake for the front one.
Fortunately my buddy has the same model of Shimano hydraulic brakes I selected, so I was able to measure their width inside the rotor as approx. 18 mm. Then I also measured this scale drawing of the GMAC motor:https://ebikes.ca/amfile/file/download/ ... duct/1180/, and it looks like the clearance could be as much as 19.7 mm! GRIN Tech pays attention to little details so I'm confident it will fit together in the end...even if some creativity is required.

I did decide to get a suspension fork, in fact I ordered this tasty morsel off eBay last night: https://www.jensonusa.com/manitou-markh ... rer-9mm-QR There were several reasons to upgrade:
  • Better handling at speed
  • More comfy on dirt
  • Rated for 180 mm brake rotor, vs. 160 mm limit on the stock Nazca fork
  • Reduced shock and vibration loads on battery mount and solar bits
The only downside I see (beside the weight) is I will need zip ties to mount a full fender.

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Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by Peterfr12 » Jan 13 2021 5:33pm

Hi K2orbust,

Thanks for your reply.
Indeed, you are going to use a suspension fork! I checked the image of the Nazca Pionner but forget to read carefully your paragraph !
Thanks for your comments about the GRIN hub motor. They really pay attention to everything. I thought about it or a dual setup with 2 GRIN hub motors. I will see what performance I can have with the MXUS. it is much heavier. I am planning to use it for commuting and doing long tour of 150 miles a day or more. so i need reliability and avoid overheating while being able to achieve 30 mph continuously.

on my last built I have a Manitou circus fork with 20 mm axle through. The Manitou Markhor accept a 9 mm axle. My disk brake are 203 mm.
to fix my mudguard/fender I purchased this : 30-45mm Turn Signal Light Bracket Fork Mount Ear Clamp For Chopper Bobbers Black on Ebay, https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/30-45mm-Turn ... 1967854165. So I dont need any zip ties. I will make a picture later during the week of my new 'setup' as a picture worth 1000 words.

The mudguards/fenders I used are from a German company: https://classic-cycle.com/fender-and-co ... ch-fender/. They are made of aluminium and look great.

with my former build mac 8t combined with a 58.8V 27Ah (so 14S) battery from em3ev, i was able to reach 33 mph and covered 50 miles with it. However i did not want to depleted the battery so I charged it to 80% and do 25 miles and charged it at work again. With a 13S battery (52 V fully charged) I am not sure you will reach 30 mph.

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k2orbust   1 mW

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Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by k2orbust » Jan 13 2021 9:41pm

Yes, for long runs at high speed it seems there's no replacement for a big heavy motor! I'm planning for a flat 15 miles each way, so the GMAC should do the trick. In solar touring mode, daily energy will be limited by the panel output so average speeds might be low 20s mph.

I will be using a 14s battery as well. Also, I chose a fancy field oriented controller (GRIN Baserunner) that does a thing called field weakening, to spin the motor faster than it should theoretically go for a given voltage. Black magic! Justin at GRIN says this effect is NOT modeled in their motor simulator (yet), but is included in the trip simulator
(https://ebikes.ca/tools/trip-simulator.html). This is why identical inputs to the motor simulator and trip simulator show different results.

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Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by k2orbust » Jan 15 2021 12:04am

I still need to select a battery to go under the seat. Two out of two vendors said dire terrible things about mounting a downtube battery on the underside of a tube, though I'm aware tons of people do it. But I'm also looking at these two hard-sided batteries from EM3EV. I'd have to cruft my own battery mount, but so be it. (Even a downtube battery would need some fabrication because they are too wide to fit on the centerline next to the chain tube)

14s5p rectangle battery: https://em3ev.com/shop/50v-14s5p-rectan ... 9072265625
15s6p triangle battery: https://em3ev.com/shop/50v-14s6p-small-triangle-pack/
Both of these can charge through the discharge wires at up to 10 A, which is advantageous for my solar plans.

I snipped out carboard to see how they would fit between the wheels (neglecting padding and mount thickness):

1) Rectangle battery the tall way. The back end overlaps the suspension pivot, but otherwise works fine.
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2) Rectangle battery the wide way. In this case I'd hang it completely below the chain tube, along the bike centerline.
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3) Triangle battery on the long edge, point forward. This meets the curve of the front wheel nicely.
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4) Triangle battery on the long edge, point backward. This has the best ground clearance, but extends furthest past the suspension pivot at the back.
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5) Triangle battery on the medium edge. This stays completely clear of the suspension pivot, but the lowest point of the battery seems like it could be in harm's way.
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Of these options, 2, 3, and 4 all appeal. I will wait for the suspension fork to get here, though, to see how that changes the front wheel position.

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Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by 99t4 » Jan 15 2021 1:58am

Did you say your battery cardboard mock-ups ignored case padding? Then you can't really rely on what the photos are showing.

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Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by k2orbust » Jan 15 2021 3:16am

99t4 wrote:
Jan 15 2021 1:58am
Then you can't really rely on what the photos are showing.
I'm not sure how much padding is enough, but got to start somewhere. There must be a hundred battery build threads to study!

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Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by Peterfr12 » Jan 15 2021 5:13pm

Hi,

For your battery I will go with option 4 the one I choose to hold my massive battery : 72V 50Ah! (20s14p)
There is no interference with the fork.

The battery is made of 5 aluminium panels soldered together. I did not want to solder a hinge so I decided to use a sliding technique for opening/closing the box with the 6th panel. Therefore I had two screw 2 L shape sticks along the side of the front battery box to act as a rail/guide for the front panel.
battery box r1.jpg
battery box r1.jpg (48.61 KiB) Viewed 168 times
battery box r2.jpg
battery box r2.jpg (55.74 KiB) Viewed 168 times
The battery box is held tight to the frame using a saddle clamp.
https://www.ebay.co.uk/i/233205545762?c ... gJJgvD_BwE

And also the battery box is attached to both side carriers luggage with some very long M8 screw. The box does not move at all.
there are holes in the battery box to hold it secure and also for the wires.
bike with home made box r3.JPG
bike with home made box r3.JPG (85.5 KiB) Viewed 168 times
battery box description.jpg
battery box description.jpg (253.9 KiB) Viewed 168 times
English is not my mother tongue but I hope I can be understood.

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k2orbust   1 mW

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Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by k2orbust » Jan 15 2021 7:18pm

Indeed that is a generously sized battery! I am most curious how you will pad the batteries inside the metal box. Or are they bolted right to the metal?

Peterfr12   1 W

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Location: Northamptonshire, United Kingdom

Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by Peterfr12 » Jan 16 2021 3:34pm

Hi,

My 20s14p battery is assembled using NESE modules purchased here from a guy from Lithuania. i purchased the 18560 cell battery from a Polish man nickname 'Tumish'.
the NESE modules are arranged to make a block and keep tight thanks to a 'fence' made of sticks of wood. the battery with the wooden enclosure weights 18 kg by itself. the 'fence shape' allows me to lift the battery easily and there is no need for handles as I was thinking to add initially.

once the wooden crate is inside the aluminum box, it does not move due to the weight of the battery itself. I can add a little piece of wood to fill the 1 cm space. With this system i can remove my battery if i want to charge it at home.
20s14p from top NESE modules.jpg
20s14p from top NESE modules.jpg (54.79 KiB) Viewed 130 times
20s14p from top NESE modules side view.jpg
20s14p from top NESE modules side view.jpg (54.94 KiB) Viewed 130 times
20s14p from top NESE modules other side view .jpg
20s14p from top NESE modules other side view .jpg (44.82 KiB) Viewed 130 times
battery box with the 20s14p battery.png
battery box with the 20s14p battery.png (944.87 KiB) Viewed 130 times

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k2orbust   1 mW

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Joined: Mar 27 2011 5:23pm

Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by k2orbust » Jan 22 2021 9:35pm

The suspension fork got here! Manitou Markhor 26" off eBay:
PXL_20210122_170652987.jpg
PXL_20210122_170652987.jpg (2.35 MiB) Viewed 57 times
But now I realize the old fork has a threaded steerer--headaches ensue. At least all headsets and steerers involved have straight 1 1/8" tubes. It looks like Peterfr12 changed headsets at some point, too!

The challenge is this long, recumbent-specific stem grabs onto a 1" diameter quill steerer--it won't fit over the 1 1/8" threadless steerer of the new fork.
PXL_20210122_184105338.jpg
PXL_20210122_184105338.jpg (3.6 MiB) Viewed 57 times
The quick and dirty solution is to mount the new fork without a star fangled nut, by some creative other means. (These alternative means can make it difficult to preload the headset bearings, though.) Then the old quill steerer would drop right inside the new fork:
PXL_20210122_182937868.jpg
PXL_20210122_182937868.jpg (2.47 MiB) Viewed 57 times
The more correct solution involves ordering a 1 1/8" stem from Nazca in Holland--in March when their winter holiday is over! I may not have the patience to do it right.

A retrograde solution would be to turn the new threadless fork into a threaded one. Machine shops can do it but I understand strength can be compromised with aluminum steerer tubes.
Last edited by k2orbust on Jan 22 2021 10:11pm, edited 4 times in total.

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amberwolf   100 GW

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Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by amberwolf » Jan 22 2021 9:50pm

k2orbust wrote:
Jan 22 2021 9:35pm

The quick and dirty solution is to mount the new fork without a star fangled nut, by some creative other means. (These alternative means can make it difficult to preload the headset bearings, though.) Then the old quill steerer would drop right inside the new fork:
How about this?
https://www.universalcycles.com/shoppin ... p?id=10600
;)
Attachments
10600.jpg
10600.jpg (18.92 KiB) Viewed 54 times
10600 (3).jpg
10600 (3).jpg (18.48 KiB) Viewed 53 times

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k2orbust   1 mW

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Posts: 13
Joined: Mar 27 2011 5:23pm

Re: Nazca Pioneer solar recumbent build

Post by k2orbust » Jan 22 2021 9:55pm

amberwolf wrote:
Jan 22 2021 9:50pm

How about this?
https://www.universalcycles.com/shoppin ... p?id=10600
;)
I did search for Problems Solvers headsets but this item didn't come up! Thanks for the tip. Problem Solvers solve so many problems :-D

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