Bar end shifter for Shimano CUES?

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I have a Greenspeed trike, and it uses bar-end shifters. I want to change the derailleur and Shimano's CUES system is intended for longevity. Shimano only provides trigger shifters.

Does anyone have a recommendation for a bar-end shifter that will work with CUES? My trike currently has 10spd Micro-shift, but I'm open to changing all over to 11spd CUES.
 
I have a Greenspeed trike, and it uses bar-end shifters. I want to change the derailleur and Shimano's CUES system is intended for longevity. Shimano only provides trigger shifters.

Does anyone have a recommendation for a bar-end shifter that will work with CUES? My trike currently has 10spd Micro-shift, but I'm open to changing all over to 11spd CUES.
I'm not savvy Shimano's CUES sys. I am, however, somewhat knowledgeable with the highly regarded Suntour barcons. These are friction barcons, NOT indexed... meaning however, they will pair-up with nearly any derailleur, providing there's sufficient cable travel. The Suntours are extremely well made - akin to a Swiss Watch - and smooth as glass. I even use one for my SRAM i-3 IGH.

 
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I even use one for my SRAM i-3 IGH.
Thanks.

Can you say how you determine you've shifted? Is it a feel, a "thunk", a sound or a lack of sound (grinding), something else?

I am old enough to have ridden non-indexed derailleurs, so I have some experience. But it might be something else, and I'll only know if I ask.
 
For me, the easiest thing to tell is the change in the feedback in the pedals to the gear change (increase or decrease in torque resistance).
 
Thanks.

Can you say how you determine you've shifted?
Depends on the gearing used. On the i-3 (and the AW Sturmey), it's usually feed back from the hub via the pedals. On the derailleur, I can audibly detect when all is silent after the shift (sometimes occasionally tweaking the shifter if necessary). I realize it probably sounds awkward to others, but I've acclimated years ago.

But reality is, nearly all cable actuated shifting mechanisms leaves much to be desired. Stainless cables & Teflon housings have improved shifting somewhat, but not to the point, in my opinion, optimizing feedback. Without a doubt, the Suntour Superbe Pro Group +stainless cables smeared w/Drislide, was one of the smoothest.
 
Since I haven't had to deal with CUES yet, I don't know how long its (proprietary) cable pull is. But I do know it's 11 speed. And it's a safe bet it's a longer pull than SIS.

It's pretty normal for older friction shifters to lack enough physical range to shift 11, or even 8/9/10 speed cassettes. There may not be any kind of friction shifter that has enough range for CUES.

No 11-speed system is designed for durability, unless you mean durability compared to other 11-speed setups.
 
Allegedly . . . as I have no first hand knowledge of the new stuff.
The CUES system is cross compatible between 9,10,11 speed systems.
So a road 11 speed bar end shifter should work.

See this article
 
Allegedly . . . as I have no first hand knowledge of the new stuff.
The CUES system is cross compatible between 9,10,11 speed systems.
So a road 11 speed bar end shifter should work.

See this article
CUES is only cross compatible with other CUES family components (they say). That implies a different, probably longer, cable pull increment.

As Shimano's de facto industry standard SIS pull ratio becomes fractured into myriad mutually incompatible systems, in time we'll probably discover some happy accidents where things that were never intended to work together, somehow do.
 
It's pretty normal for older friction shifters to lack enough physical range to shift 11, or even 8/9/10 speed cassettes. There may not be any kind of friction shifter that has enough range for CUES.
Could a pulley designed like the TravelAgent
be used to correct this the same way the TA corrects lever pull for brake cables?
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The articles mention the CUES system works from the 11 speed chain implying the cog spacing must be the same 11 speed as well.
For many years Shimano shifters have been 1:1 pull ratio so if the rear cassette was 9 speed the shifter needing to be 9 speed and so on.
Reading between the lines of the various articles I suspect an 11 speed bar end shifter will have the correct cable pull for CUES with some unused "clicks" if a 9 or 10 speed cassette is used.
The question : who will be brave enough to make the purchase to try ?
 
From: Shimano Cues kills off Alivio, Acera and Altus, with Tiagra to be phased out

"The Shimano Cues range is broken down into the following tiers:
  • Shimano Cues U3000: 9-speed
  • Shimano Cues U4000: 9-speed
  • Shimano Cues U6000: 10- or 11-speed
  • Shimano Cues U8000: 11-speed
This isn’t a strictly accurate representation of how the range is laid out because some components (eg, front derailleurs or cranksets) span multiple ‘speed’ groupsets, but it gives a rough overview of the hierarchy.

Unlike Shimano’s existing groupsets, the cable pull ratio, cassette cog spacing and chains are shared across all components – regardless of whether they are 9-, 10- or 11-speed, and where they sit in the product hierarchy. This means bike brands and consumers will be freer to spec from “a menu of components” to suit their needs. If the unconfirmed drop-bar shifters use the same cable pull ratio, this will mean mullet-drivetrain builds – pairing truly wide-range MTB drivetrains with drop bars – will soon be a possibility."

Edit to Add (for what it's worth):

The CUES shifters and derailleurs use the Linkglide cable pull ratio.

Somebody on Reddit measured the Linkglide cable pull ratio:
The CUES shifters and derailleurs use the Linkglide cable pull ratio.

One index click of the Linkglide shifter moves 3.5mm of cable, which moves the derailleur 3.7mm to shift to the next cog. This gives a cable pull ratio of 3.7mm / 3.5mm = 1.05. This is NOT the same cable pull ratio as mechanical 11-speed Dura-Ace, Ultegra and 105-- Mechanical 11sp DA, Ultegra and 105 use a 1.4 cable pull ratio. 1mm of cable pull moves the derailleur 1.4mm. So no, CUES shifters and derailleurs will not be compatible with Mechanical 11sp DA, Ultegra or 105 shifters or derailleurs.
 
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Could a pulley designed like the TravelAgent
be used to correct this the same way the TA corrects lever pull for brake cables?

Travel Agent can be used to increase or decrease the amount of cable travel by about a 2:1 ratio. So yes, it could multiply the cable travel of a friction shifter at the cost of some precision.

JTek made similar widgets with closer ratios for the purpose of reconciling Shimano and Campagnolo parts, or components for different numbers of cassette sprockets.
 
A copy paste from the internet :
CUES U6000 is a 10 & 11-speed group. Both use 11-speed chains and Shimano's newer LinkGlide (LG) shifting. This means that the cassette pitch and cable pull ratios make them inter-compatible with Deore M5130 and XT M8130 LG drive trains.

Shimano Compatibility chart :
Link to chart

It's been a long time since I've been a bike builder and buyer of new stuff . . . back in the day I mixed road shifters with mountain bike rear derailleurs / cassettes on every bike.
A good, fast, aerodynamic recumbent requires a wide range gear system.
Low gears to climb the hills and high gears to take advantage of the faster pace.
The best way to know what works is to try it.
 
Do you think 3D printed plastics (like ABS instead of PETG) would survive long as a pulley in that type of system?

I ask because I have a printer (that I still have to learn how to use and model for) but my metalworking skills for things that require any degree of precision are rather poor, and I think I could use something like this to modify the travel of a cable-operated throttle. I use two of those, one for the actual thumb throttle (not often used but necessary on occasion), and one to control the variable regen braking force, pulled by a brake lever. However, the amount of throttle movement I get on the brake COT is less than that of the throttle COT, thus less voltage output. The Cycle Analyst doesn't have a way to compensate for this. I could probably make something electronic to do the compensation instead, but am curious if this is a potential solution in general, for other people that need this sort of solution.
 
Do you think 3D printed plastics (like ABS instead of PETG) would survive long as a pulley in that type of system?
For that kind of application, you might be fine with PLA. ABS and PETG will both bend, shift and deform before they break from stress, whereas PLA is shown to be stronger on average than most filaments, until it shatters. So maybe, use PLA and carry a backup?
 
I'm not totally sure, but I don't think stress would be the issue in this type of application, just wear on the pulley-cable interface surface.
 
Do you think 3D printed plastics (like ABS instead of PETG) would survive long as a pulley in that type of system?

Probably, if you stick to the principle that cables should wrap around sheaves 50x their diameter. If you use dinky pulleys like JTek, both the specific forces on the pulley and the fatigue on the cable strands could be a problem.

50x would be 60mm, close to 2-1/2" in this case, so pretty big and goofy. Point remains that bigger is better.
 
I'm not totally sure, but I don't think stress would be the issue in this type of application, just wear on the pulley-cable interface surface.
Hm, then maybe it would be a good application for PETG. I'd be interested to see it.
 
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