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DECEMBER 21, 2012!

This is the dawning of the Age of Aquarius!

We are all energy... nothing created, nothing destroyed.

We will not stay in these bodies forever, but our entities will live forever.
Stop and take a look at the body you drive everyday. Eating well, sleeping, absorbing sunshine...etc... is your BMS lol
We here are searching for cool transport, yet we are cool transport! 8)

See ya's all on the next go around! :twisted:


Tommy L sends....\\m// Rocking Onward every single day \\m//
 
Tommy L said:
This is the dawning of the Age of Aquarius!

We are all energy... nothing created, nothing destroyed.

We will not stay in these bodies forever, but our entities will live forever.
Stop and take a look at the body you drive everyday. Eating well, sleeping, absorbing sunshine...etc... is your BMS lol
We here are searching for cool transport, yet we are cool transport! 8)

Ya, I wanna believe all that, I really do.

Been doing a Doomsday Marathon all week trying to scare the shit out of myself with every documentary and movie I can find. AND IT’S WORKING! :lol:

Knowing was the best
 
Dee Jay said:
What do you wanna do before we all die?

If you had just a minute to breathe and they granted you one final wish
Would you ask for something like another chance?
Or something similar as this? Don't worry too much
It'll happen to you as sure as your sorrows are joys
- Traffic - Low Spark of High Heeled boys

What's to do? I grew up quite anxious to have my own family, but that doesn't seem to be working out. If I was watching all coming to a close, I wouldn't be thinking about a bucket list, I'd be thinking about the things that stood in the way, the life I never had because there was no opportunity.

Ah, but what about the things I DID do? There I could quote the author of 'Silas Marner' and other works, one George Eliot, who said "It's never too late to be the person you always wanted to be." For all the efforts of my mentally ill mother to deliberately keep me from doing well in school, I did finally get to be an honor student - Although I had to wait until after I'd first graduated from college to continue with school and reach the Gold Key level. Keep in mind George Eliot was born Mary Anne Evans. NOOOOO, this is not a transsexual, she wanted to separate her work from the light romances other female writers of her era were producing, (She even published an article criticizing the female writers of her time) hence the male penname.

But as the question points out, we don't think about that at the last minute, do we? The thing is, I don't hold myself back. It was never about fear - That's why Dad started calling me 'Dauntless.' The only thing I'd say I'd be serious about if I thought I was about to die was to get the house cleaned up, painted, new roof/windows - Like I don't want the next owner talking about me living this way when they didn't even know me. Oh, I should leave them with the solar on the new roof. If the world was ending though, it wouldn't matter, right?

[youtube]udyNr0pY6ak[/youtube]
 
Damn, Burning Man was no 1 on my bucket list. Any way to do a virtual Burning Man?

Been thinking. Maybe Dec21 will fulfill my bucket list by making me a burning man. If not, I'll have another chance next year.
 
salty9 said:
Damn, Burning Man was no 1 on my bucket list. Any way to do a virtual Burning Man?

Been thinking. Maybe Dec21 will fulfill my bucket list by making me a burning man. If not, I'll have another chance next year.

Daffy Duck can tell you how to one up everyone on this one.

[youtube]lEYYYMuwCyA[/youtube]
 
The Mayan calendar that ends in Dec 2012...it was using a year of 360 days, so that particular calendar has already expired.

2012 on the Catholic calendar is the same as 5773 on the Jewish calendar, so...Who knows?
 
Bring It
 
salty9 said:
Damn, Burning Man was no 1 on my bucket list. Any way to do a virtual Burning Man?

Been thinking. Maybe Dec21 will fulfill my bucket list by making me a burning man. If not, I'll have another chance next year.
Burning Man is a great idea, been wanting to go for along time now. They should have an fair-thee-well event called Burning Men, Women and Children :lol:

I realized that my question was not about what's on your bucket list but more about the things you had been planning on doing, things that you thought you had plenty of time to do but ended up getting short-changed at the checkout counter.. or is that the same thing?

Me, aside from the obvious things like seeing the kids growing up and living full lives (and seeing new Star Wars films) <-- :roll: :lol: all I really ever wanted to do was grow and harvest some jalapenos . :lol: I wonder if I'll even get to harvest them :lol:
 
spinningmagnets said:
The Mayan calendar that ends in Dec 2012...it was using a year of 360 days, so that particular calendar has already expired.

2012 on the Catholic calendar is the same as 5773 on the Jewish calendar, so...Who knows?


I know what happens. Just like every other calendar when you get to the end. You flip to a new copy and start over from day 1. Sun still rises, but everyone in this age happens to understand the heliocentric nature of our solar system. What will the next age bring and what understandings will be part of this paradigm?
 
if anybody would like a safe place for their gold<silver. diamonds ect i am prepared to accept the responsibility :mrgreen:
 
kriskros said:
if anybody would like a safe place for their gold<silver. diamonds ect i am prepared to accept the responsibility :mrgreen:

Mom seems to think she'll have them after the end of the world. In fact, that's what she BOUGHT it all for, to have it after the end of the world. I've tried to explain 'End of the World' to her, but she doesn't seem to get it.

If you just need to go to a bunch of insanity that uses art as it's excuse, they have some crazy yet downright civilized (Well, so I'm told) events in Canada. (One last August, the other was a day ago.)

http://www.scotiabanknuitblanche.ca (Nicknamed "Burning Man Metropolis.")

http://www.torontobuskerfest.com

Apparently each has all the insanity of Burning Man, but held downtown in Canada. I discovered them trying to figure out about this girl that was getting mentioned in some blogs that would pop up in some searches. There was the occasional picture, but no real explanation. So I'm assuming that she was at Nuit Blanche, that she was a spectator and not a performer, that she didn't that stop her from running around naked all night and popping up in considerable stills and video. If I could find one of the stills real quick, probably wouldn't be good to put it here as every picture I've seen so far would make this not safe for work. Oh, not sure if you'd consider a few of those pictures not safe for work.

http://flickrhivemind.net/Tags/heartmachine/Interesting

6211540828_b3bbcf6af7.jpg
 
I've had a good life. If the entire world ends on December 21st (which I don't have any faith it will), then as long as I don't leave behind my kids to fend for themselves, then I'm ok. I'd like them to live happy, healthy lives, but I only can do so much for them. At some point they are on their own.

I have a lot of tales to tell, so that's the sign of a good life (I just turned 44 and am healthy), but I have a few regrets here and there.

My two biggest dreams growing up were (in this order) to be a professional surfer and a rock star. I had (like pretty much anyone) the ability, but (also like most people) I lacked the confidence to pursue those dreams and I lacked the perspective to know they were possible. My dreams of professional surfing started at a very young age (about ten), but I was living in an area where most guys were already proficient by that age, and I was catching up. What I didn't know was that 90% of most professional sports is in the brain, not the body. Sure, some sports mandate a certain body type (which is why women who are 6,3 will not be Olympic gymnasts), but I have a standard-issue physique, and pro surfing was certainly possible. But I didn't pursue it. I did, however, have a lot of good waves in my life, and feel like my childhood and teenage years were magical. I wouldn't trade my youth for anything. It was so nice growing up on the beach in Southern California in a very small town where most people knew each other. It was south of Los Angeles and few people knew about it (Leucadia, California). I can honestly say that other than sickness or the few times I got in trouble, every day was a good day, and boredom was never an issue for us.

Growing up a surfer was more than any sport or even lifestyle. It went beyond that to a religion of sorts. I have seen as close to magic as one can. Getting tubed is metaphysical, if that's the right word. To catch a way, ride it, and all of a sudden realize you are about to be inside it....that's just one of the most amazing feelings in the world. You literally cannot think of anything else at that moment. No fear, no pain, no stress. It's surreal, and even though it only lasts a few seconds, time slows. I've been in barrels (tubes) that I had no chance of getting out of. I was set apart from the world as that curtain came down, and for two to three more seconds (until wipeout) it was like being in another dimension. No matter how good a surfer becomes at high-performance moves, he is always....always...always tamed by and addicted to the barrel. The surfer hardly moves when in the barrel. He sets himself up for it with the right turns and speed, but once he's locked into just the right spot, he is on autopilot and the wave and surfer are one (for a few seconds). After that he might bash his head on a coral reef, but that's not even really a thought until it happens.

So, although I didn't become a pro surfer, I had some magical times out on that ocean in California, Hawaii, Mexico, Florida, North Carolina, and a few other spots.

My dream of becoming a rock star was even more powerful as I grew older and lost my will to surf professionally (although I still surfed almost every day and loved it. I just wasn't interested anymore in competition. I'll always be a surfer until the day I can no longer move). I would put on headphones and listen to hard rock and heavy metal, imagining myself on stage in front of thousands as the guitarist or bassist. My fantasies were so powerful that all the hair on my body would stand up. I got that feeling the first time listening to Ozzy Osbourne's first album, especially the opening track.

My first instrument was an electric bass I bought when I was 15. I couldn't afford an amp, so I would put on the stereo and play that electric bass as hard as I could in order to hear it above the background music. I played Rush, Dio, Black Sabbath, Metallica....all the stuff from that time period. I was obsessed with that bass. I can still play, but in all those years I lacked the confidence to put a real band together and make a go of it (even though I told the world I would be a rock star someday). We threw a band together and played one gig. That was it, and I never played before a crowd again (although I would still fantasize about it).

I went the normal route and finished college, started teaching, and have been doing that ever since. It's a good life and I'm glad to be contributing to the world and attempting to make it a better place (even though I don't have faith in man's ability to stop murdering his fellow man. Geesh, what's the deal with that).

For me, my dream is to raise two happy daughters, be the best father and husband possible, and after that my priority is to give all the children I teach a positive experience in school (I teach fifth grade). I'm not the most effective teacher when it comes to getting them to perform the best on the springtime standardized testing (they do fine), but I don't see myself as that kind of educator.

I strive to give kids a positive experience in which I fill their heads full of confidence and convince each of them that they have a gift. I tell them that finding that gift is the hardest challenge of all, but that it's in there just waiting to come out. I am proud that one of the things parents tell me is, "My kid used to hate coming to school. Now he loves it." You can't measure that with a test. I instill in kids a love for learning and try to get them to understand what Mark Twain once said: "Try not to let school get in the way of learning." He said something like that, and I tell the kids, "We are going to teach you all about the big, wonderful world.....all from within the confines of a concrete box." Sure, it's sarcastic, but I often feel like a square peg when it comes to education. Kids need to be outside as much as possible and exploring, not stuck in a small room with four walls, one door and two tiny windows that don't open.

I want to honor childhood. I want every child to not only have a great time of it (growing up), but to be excited about the possibilities and the wonderful things that await their future. I want a world in which children are never robbed of their innocence. This is a right. Children have a right to be happy, safe, un-molested of body and mind, and never abused.

Now, I can't protect them from what goes on outside the school, but while they are in school I work my hardest to make sure they are taken care of, even if that means being pushy or demanding of other teachers (many of whom forget how sensitive children are and how little things make a big difference). There are no do-overs for childhood. You only get to be a kid once, so we adults need to let them really enjoy it. Yes, they have a lot of learning to do, but it really pisses me off that children are often used as the punching bag of adults who are bitter about their own lives.


Back on topic: If I knew for sure that the world was going to blow up on December 21st, I'd want to spend this next three months on the island of Oahu. I'd sleep in every day, wake up and have a good breakfast with my family, take them to the beach, surf at least once each day...preferably twice...and drink good beer all evening with my wife and kids (although they can have soda...all they want).

That's about it for me.
 
MikeFairbanks said:
I've had a good life. If the entire world ends on December 21st (which I don't have any faith it will), then as long as I don't leave behind my kids to fend for themselves, then I'm ok. I'd like them to live happy, healthy lives, but I only can do so much for them. At some point they are on their own.

I have a lot of tales to tell, so that's the sign of a good life (I just turned 44 and am healthy), but I have a few regrets here and there.

My two biggest dreams growing up were (in this order) to be a professional surfer and a rock star. I had (like pretty much anyone) the ability, but (also like most people) I lacked the confidence to pursue those dreams and I lacked the perspective to know they were possible. My dreams of professional surfing started at a very young age (about ten), but I was living in an area where most guys were already proficient by that age, and I was catching up. What I didn't know was that 90% of most professional sports is in the brain, not the body. Sure, some sports mandate a certain body type (which is why women who are 6,3 will not be Olympic gymnasts), but I have a standard-issue physique, and pro surfing was certainly possible. But I didn't pursue it. I did, however, have a lot of good waves in my life, and feel like my childhood and teenage years were magical. I wouldn't trade my youth for anything. It was so nice growing up on the beach in Southern California in a very small town where most people knew each other. It was south of Los Angeles and few people knew about it (Leucadia, California). I can honestly say that other than sickness or the few times I got in trouble, every day was a good day, and boredom was never an issue for us.

Growing up a surfer was more than any sport or even lifestyle. It went beyond that to a religion of sorts. I have seen as close to magic as one can. Getting tubed is metaphysical, if that's the right word. To catch a way, ride it, and all of a sudden realize you are about to be inside it....that's just one of the most amazing feelings in the world. You literally cannot think of anything else at that moment. No fear, no pain, no stress. It's surreal, and even though it only lasts a few seconds, time slows. I've been in barrels (tubes) that I had no chance of getting out of. I was set apart from the world as that curtain came down, and for two to three more seconds (until wipeout) it was like being in another dimension. No matter how good a surfer becomes at high-performance moves, he is always....always...always tamed by and addicted to the barrel. The surfer hardly moves when in the barrel. He sets himself up for it with the right turns and speed, but once he's locked into just the right spot, he is on autopilot and the wave and surfer are one (for a few seconds). After that he might bash his head on a coral reef, but that's not even really a thought until it happens.

So, although I didn't become a pro surfer, I had some magical times out on that ocean in California, Hawaii, Mexico, Florida, North Carolina, and a few other spots.

My dream of becoming a rock star was even more powerful as I grew older and lost my will to surf professionally (although I still surfed almost every day and loved it. I just wasn't interested anymore in competition. I'll always be a surfer until the day I can no longer move). I would put on headphones and listen to hard rock and heavy metal, imagining myself on stage in front of thousands as the guitarist or bassist. My fantasies were so powerful that all the hair on my body would stand up. I got that feeling the first time listening to Ozzy Osbourne's first album, especially the opening track.

My first instrument was an electric bass I bought when I was 15. I couldn't afford an amp, so I would put on the stereo and play that electric bass as hard as I could in order to hear it above the background music. I played Rush, Dio, Black Sabbath, Metallica....all the stuff from that time period. I was obsessed with that bass. I can still play, but in all those years I lacked the confidence to put a real band together and make a go of it (even though I told the world I would be a rock star someday). We threw a band together and played one gig. That was it, and I never played before a crowd again (although I would still fantasize about it).

I went the normal route and finished college, started teaching, and have been doing that ever since. It's a good life and I'm glad to be contributing to the world and attempting to make it a better place (even though I don't have faith in man's ability to stop murdering his fellow man. Geesh, what's the deal with that).

For me, my dream is to raise two happy daughters, be the best father and husband possible, and after that my priority is to give all the children I teach a positive experience in school (I teach fifth grade). I'm not the most effective teacher when it comes to getting them to perform the best on the springtime standardized testing (they do fine), but I don't see myself as that kind of educator.

I strive to give kids a positive experience in which I fill their heads full of confidence and convince each of them that they have a gift. I tell them that finding that gift is the hardest challenge of all, but that it's in there just waiting to come out. I am proud that one of the things parents tell me is, "My kid used to hate coming to school. Now he loves it." You can't measure that with a test. I instill in kids a love for learning and try to get them to understand what Mark Twain once said: "Try not to let school get in the way of learning." He said something like that, and I tell the kids, "We are going to teach you all about the big, wonderful world.....all from within the confines of a concrete box." Sure, it's sarcastic, but I often feel like a square peg when it comes to education. Kids need to be outside as much as possible and exploring, not stuck in a small room with four walls, one door and two tiny windows that don't open.

I want to honor childhood. I want every child to not only have a great time of it (growing up), but to be excited about the possibilities and the wonderful things that await their future. I want a world in which children are never robbed of their innocence. This is a right. Children have a right to be happy, safe, un-molested of body and mind, and never abused.

Now, I can't protect them from what goes on outside the school, but while they are in school I work my hardest to make sure they are taken care of, even if that means being pushy or demanding of other teachers (many of whom forget how sensitive children are and how little things make a big difference). There are no do-overs for childhood. You only get to be a kid once, so we adults need to let them really enjoy it. Yes, they have a lot of learning to do, but it really pisses me off that children are often used as the punching bag of adults who are bitter about their own lives.


Back on topic: If I knew for sure that the world was going to blow up on December 21st, I'd want to spend this next three months on the island of Oahu. I'd sleep in every day, wake up and have a good breakfast with my family, take them to the beach, surf at least once each day...preferably twice...and drink good beer all evening with my wife and kids (although they can have soda...all they want).

That's about it for me.

Right on dude... Right. On.
 
[youtube]dGt2CkfpvQY[/youtube]

cal3thousand said:
Right on dude... Right. On.

yeah, he even mentioned Mark Twain.

So I was in the 8th grade when a rather tempermental priest came to the class to share a life lesson from his experience at the library. Seems he couldn't find 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,' when he asked the librarian suggested he look under Samuel Clemens. So the priest stalked off and came to tell us about keeping one's head when dealing with such ignorance. As I was about to have to learn.

You see, during my summer of age 10 I'd discovered reruns of an failed primetime TV series that was used as a kids show, sometimes cut up during the cartoon anthologies. Bad influence that television is, it caused me to read the first of the books on which the series was based, 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.' Proved a bit of a challenge, but I bet there's only one in 100 million 10 year olds reading that book. I even wound up reading the first meeting between Tom and Huck to the class, which led to a classmate using it when she entered some dramatic reading contest for kids. I was busy winning the Statewide Boys Club reading contest at the time.

From there came the coming of age drama 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,' then the science fiction 'Tom Sawyer Abroad' which seemed the true inspiration for the TV series 'The New Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.' Seemed hard for me to believe that there was someone who didn't know that Mark Twain's real name was Samuel Clemens. But this priest there in my 8th grade classroom wasn't getting it even as I told him.

So I held up 'Tom Sawyer, Detective' with the author as SAMUEL CLEMENS. And that fool nun that was supposed to be teaching me said that's not a real Mark Twain book, Samuel Clemens was just some guy who wrote with Mark Twains' characters. (Sigh. HEAVY sigh.) Indeed, I learned a lesson in keeping one's head when faced with such loud, obnoxious IGNORANCE.

And whatever I did in life, I wanted to do it as Tom Sawyer. In grade school I'd emerged as the star of school and playground basketball courts alike, only to have the lifelong leg troubles emerging in 8th grade. So much for the NBA. I came from a real car family, ironically our last name is used as an abbreviation for 'Vehicle.' Dad the president of the Long Beach MB club and the Scoring Marshall for the major racing on the west coast (Indycars, Formula 1, etc.) how could I not dream of racing. Dad died before I finished school, leaving me with OLDER brothers and sisters to support. Racing is expensive, darn it.

But I'd always remember Tom Sawyer in this TV show, coming alive in 'MacGyver' fashion as at last his reading and daydreaming of far off places and people became useful. The realities of casting left us with a straight haired, oversize Tom who had none of the originals' fear of being mistaken for a girl, but his chemistry with the undersized but at least red haired Huck captured the true spirit of the books. It also brought to life the way I wanted to live. That and Dad talking to me before he died, about the difference in the way I was turning out compared to the others as well as reminding me of how when I was little he'd called me Dauntless, a play on Douglas, because it just never mattered how scared I got, I would go ahead and just do it. (Picture the southern twang, "Dawwnetless.")

And that part I've always achieved. I've encountered far more ignorance than just on the work of Mark Twain, but there was plenty there, too. Just because Tom was too busy with his literature to memorize the bible verses for Sunday school, (He had memorized 'Robin Hood' and 'Ivanhoe' at 13, don't forget) or got a bit figety in his regular class, people lose sight of what a well rounded education he displayed at a young age. Huck, meanwhile, was saying he'd decided he enjoyed school in the first chapter of the only book with his name in the title, then became the budding journalist covering local celebrity Tom on quests for new adventures for his 'Evening with Tom Sawyer' speaking appearances in that time of no radio or TV in time for the 3rd book. People who've never read any of these books talk knowingly of what illiterate bumpkins Tom and especially Huck are, even though 14-15 year old Huck rushes to read everything he can about the Crusades because Tom likens an event in town to that time in history. (It's all right there in Mark Twain/Samuel Clemens work.) I could bore you with my own ongoing education, but this is what really led to me just staying in school as my socalled career never became fulltime. Tom was right, it's all great fun to understand when noone else does.

So maybe I just always feel like there's something else to get done. I always think these people who obsess over the end of the world are people whose life never really got started in the first place. The world ending makes the latest convenient excuse for not hoisting the hiney off the couch. I assume they weren't going to be playing the school team high school sports, I wonder if they played in the intramural leagues. (I had 3 basketball and one baseball intramural championships. Bad leg and all.) I remember the friend that said he'd never go racing unless he could be with a top team from the start. So is he facing the 21st with dread? He sure never came racing gokarts or bikes with me. These people who say 'Noone ever died wishing he'd worked more' are probably those who never put themselves into their work. And they're wrong, many die wishing they'd worked harder.

As much as I enjoyed the 4 books, I wish Twain had finished the others. 'Tom Sawyer's Conspiracy' was all but finished and could have been timely in the times of the Communist blacklists, the Civil Rights 60's, post 9/11, etc. 'Tom Sawyer among the Indians' had maybe a third of the trip to the Indian Territory Huck mentions at the end of the 2nd book, but what a fabulous bashing of James Feinmore Coopers' Pathfinder/Natty Bumpo type heroes. Haven't seen published the 'Schoolhouse Hill' manuscript (The only time Becky Thatcher appears after the first book, if in fact what I've read about it is right) where Tom and Huck don't make it to class that day because of a chance encounter with. . .THE DEVIL. . . .

I'll have finals before December 21st, so I'll be able to finish these two classes I have right now before the world was scheduled to end. (Mayve I'll have enough recycling done to prevent it.) If I don't go to school, it all ends early for me, just like those who have already given up. Unless I decided to go get lost in McDougal's cave. . . .

Tom's most well now, and got his bullet around his neck on a watch-guard for a watch, and is always seeing what time it is, and so there ain't nothing more to write about, and I am rotten glad of it, because if I'd a knowed what a trouble it was to make a book I wouldn't a tackled it, and ain't a-going to no more. But I reckon I got to light out for the Territory ahead of the rest, because Aunt Polly she's going to adopt me and sivilize me, and I can't stand it. I been there before.

-Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Huck's final words

[youtube]9nCD_uCtMWY[/youtube]
[youtube]uRyrbeKPpZw[/youtube]
 
DAND214 said:
So does the earth end or mankind as we know it?

All I want to know is. Who's gonna take care of my dog?
OH I forgot my E-bikes too.

Dan
check it out
[youtube]5wMQz7vziMA[/youtube]
 
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