My own battery store and battery repair shop: ( Goodboybattery

Oh we can order them, but getting batteries shipped is a nightmare, we can get Lead Acid from the local costco, for lithium units, you either have to go to Bass Pro (they sometimes have them I am told) or up to Sacramento which is like 100ish miles out.
 
What I can't get into my own head is how I'm going to start

We have all heard about a dude starting a hobby in his garage and then from there find some people alike and then bam having a place.

Number one - The place: The location, location, location so to say a place. I can't have it in my wardrobe, office, atic or cellar so it must be somewhere else.

Number two: I need more time so I really need help with sharing cost and workload because my guess is it will be the goldrush when the jobs start coming in even though I have a plan to counter attack that.
 
::blinks::

I hate having to be adult..

ok, Biz 101.

Find your niche, the deeper your niche market is, the less foot traffic exposure you need.

I mean yeah, it would be awesome to have a wee bike shop on the side of a well used trail in the middle of nowhere, but it all depends on what you are looking for. A cool hobby almost sometimes kinda pays for itself, or a money making venture.

If you are selling tobacco products (ok, now a days this is a less stable example) you had to be up front with signage and be preferably in a locale that has an anchor attraction to bring additional new clientelle in. There is an associated cost per person, The primary metric used in marketing is "Cost per eyeball" It can be stated any way you want, but this is the measurement that marketing companies use to validate their bills.

In a bike shop, again you need to have just lifelong local exposure, or dedicated translational exposure.. Either you need to be in a mall with guaranteed foot traffic, or next to a shop that has non-competitive product, but does have the same basal market space.

The example I generally use is a place selling riding gear next to a motorcycle shop. Yeah that shop is going to lose a smidge of it's sales volume because non-associated stuff will attract the people they want. Whereas a bad idea would be a tobacco store next to a gas station. If your discount is not deep enough, they will not walk across the parking lot to you. And if your profit line is so slim that you can get them to walk over You probably are not marketing your merchandise for strong long term proposal (in other words sell it too close, and there is no covering the bills, much less the owner sanctity

Bike shops.. Honestly I never looked at them as a market venture, Chalo will certainly have a better grasp of the business, it is what he does. I am just a dork that went to Haas.

The Battery thing... Batteries+ and the other battery store that sounds the same neither one of them does much market research for their franchisees or they simply don't care because the number of failed locations I read somewhere was like 8-1 Wherein most the shops fail ou t in under 3 years. I only know because my current career ended up with me doing a lot of interaction with battery vendors etc. I met the original owner of the local franchise who had a *LOT* of anger at the whole thing I can't say, I will say thie is what lead me to looking at how these weird specialty shops stay alive. It is certainly not a community destination.

History of the Battery store in Tracy, Ca (as I heard it) the shop had an original franchisee running it, did very well for himself lots and lots of trucks and boats, the backbone of the battery world) he was also willing to take on anything, so he also set up and rigged an overhead boom truck so he could do in the field installations on Forklifts and such... Hard core go-getter..... He retired in I am told the 90's and someone (not sure whom) took over the shop and proceeded to demand that all business take place *IN* his location, no more drop ship options, no field repair.. Hell I am told he refused to even look in boats. This lead to him losing a lot of that hard won business/clientele

This was evidently then a decade long money losing situation til owner 3 got in, and his solution to the poor income.. he reduced stock on hand by like 80ish percent, when I saw it I was impressed that it said battery store nad had less than I had seen at Waly world.

There was a guy last year wanting to buy the franchise but Not sure what became of him, he had the budget for it htough..

SO there is a bit of how to look at your business.

If you are *just* wanting to look into ebike batteries.. Uhm.. odds are really low for your success.

Inventory management is going to be your best friend and worst nightmare. People do not go to Spatula city hoping to find a lovely carving set, boss if you oddly have one, but that is fringe business, smalls that will support the greater section of your counter space. but it will not benefit you if it takes more than a small fraction of your time.

If you are looking to build/assemble battery units I guarantee that they are under the evil eye right now, and no min-mall ettte would want anything to do with you.. unless of curse they *also* had a battery they really did not want to have to wait for...

In this case you are the entrepreneur you have to figure out how you are facing this *short" list that is already too long.

Last tidbit that I noticed recently... There are now multiple business' offering fetch and tarry service (they come pick up the vehicle or battery and take it elsewhere for repairs) I assume it is the buyers issue to figure out retains if they want the car in less that completely totaled condition.


I highly suggest you find a jr College and literally take business 101. I hope the Prof you find is as good as mine. I am still quoting him 30 years later.


I see it as a very high potential business, if you stick to your guns and refuse to be enticed by the "we can build it cheaper) mentalities. Do *NOT* sell cheap, as a small busines the old adage is incredibly important:: You can have Cheap, Fast or Good, Choose 2. If you are going into the cheap side, you have already lost, You have ZERO potential of success. You can *NOT* compete with Amazon and Hell, Wally world. They will take your lunch and eat it in front of you.


And, more to the point. You might make a few bucks burning the tourists. the casual person who should *NOT* be considered a cyclist. these are not people that shaved their head to get another .002 on their 500 so they might get an Olympic 2nds placement. That is also *NOT* your audience those people by the time they are ready to purchase tens of thousands of miles are being re-opened for conservation, Not sure I like the idea of a 2nd or 16th mountain capping leading to inevitable toxins release... But I believe that people can do the right thing too.

I just don't hold my breathe waiting on it.

Might well be your first "office" is a Sprinter... Or talk to the builders here. I imagine it would be really awesome if you could make a trailer fit a bike... and that wherevver you are doing this has NO hills.. not even little ones.


Ok, I have burned my typing budget for a while. and I smell ham...
 
::blinks::

I hate having to be adult..

ok, Biz 101.

Find your niche, the deeper your niche market is, the less foot traffic exposure you need.

I mean yeah, it would be awesome to have a wee bike shop on the side of a well used trail in the middle of nowhere, but it all depends on what you are looking for. A cool hobby almost sometimes kinda pays for itself, or a money making venture.

If you are selling tobacco products (ok, now a days this is a less stable example) you had to be up front with signage and be preferably in a locale that has an anchor attraction to bring additional new clientelle in. There is an associated cost per person, The primary metric used in marketing is "Cost per eyeball" It can be stated any way you want, but this is the measurement that marketing companies use to validate their bills.

In a bike shop, again you need to have just lifelong local exposure, or dedicated translational exposure.. Either you need to be in a mall with guaranteed foot traffic, or next to a shop that has non-competitive product, but does have the same basal market space.

The example I generally use is a place selling riding gear next to a motorcycle shop. Yeah that shop is going to lose a smidge of it's sales volume because non-associated stuff will attract the people they want. Whereas a bad idea would be a tobacco store next to a gas station. If your discount is not deep enough, they will not walk across the parking lot to you. And if your profit line is so slim that you can get them to walk over You probably are not marketing your merchandise for strong long term proposal (in other words sell it too close, and there is no covering the bills, much less the owner sanctity

Bike shops.. Honestly I never looked at them as a market venture, Chalo will certainly have a better grasp of the business, it is what he does. I am just a dork that went to Haas.

The Battery thing... Batteries+ and the other battery store that sounds the same neither one of them does much market research for their franchisees or they simply don't care because the number of failed locations I read somewhere was like 8-1 Wherein most the shops fail ou t in under 3 years. I only know because my current career ended up with me doing a lot of interaction with battery vendors etc. I met the original owner of the local franchise who had a *LOT* of anger at the whole thing I can't say, I will say thie is what lead me to looking at how these weird specialty shops stay alive. It is certainly not a community destination.

History of the Battery store in Tracy, Ca (as I heard it) the shop had an original franchisee running it, did very well for himself lots and lots of trucks and boats, the backbone of the battery world) he was also willing to take on anything, so he also set up and rigged an overhead boom truck so he could do in the field installations on Forklifts and such... Hard core go-getter..... He retired in I am told the 90's and someone (not sure whom) took over the shop and proceeded to demand that all business take place *IN* his location, no more drop ship options, no field repair.. Hell I am told he refused to even look in boats. This lead to him losing a lot of that hard won business/clientele

This was evidently then a decade long money losing situation til owner 3 got in, and his solution to the poor income.. he reduced stock on hand by like 80ish percent, when I saw it I was impressed that it said battery store nad had less than I had seen at Waly world.

There was a guy last year wanting to buy the franchise but Not sure what became of him, he had the budget for it htough..

SO there is a bit of how to look at your business.

If you are *just* wanting to look into ebike batteries.. Uhm.. odds are really low for your success.

Inventory management is going to be your best friend and worst nightmare. People do not go to Spatula city hoping to find a lovely carving set, boss if you oddly have one, but that is fringe business, smalls that will support the greater section of your counter space. but it will not benefit you if it takes more than a small fraction of your time.

If you are looking to build/assemble battery units I guarantee that they are under the evil eye right now, and no min-mall ettte would want anything to do with you.. unless of curse they *also* had a battery they really did not want to have to wait for...

In this case you are the entrepreneur you have to figure out how you are facing this *short" list that is already too long.

Last tidbit that I noticed recently... There are now multiple business' offering fetch and tarry service (they come pick up the vehicle or battery and take it elsewhere for repairs) I assume it is the buyers issue to figure out retains if they want the car in less that completely totaled condition.


I highly suggest you find a jr College and literally take business 101. I hope the Prof you find is as good as mine. I am still quoting him 30 years later.


I see it as a very high potential business, if you stick to your guns and refuse to be enticed by the "we can build it cheaper) mentalities. Do *NOT* sell cheap, as a small busines the old adage is incredibly important:: You can have Cheap, Fast or Good, Choose 2. If you are going into the cheap side, you have already lost, You have ZERO potential of success. You can *NOT* compete with Amazon and Hell, Wally world. They will take your lunch and eat it in front of you.


And, more to the point. You might make a few bucks burning the tourists. the casual person who should *NOT* be considered a cyclist. these are not people that shaved their head to get another .002 on their 500 so they might get an Olympic 2nds placement. That is also *NOT* your audience those people by the time they are ready to purchase tens of thousands of miles are being re-opened for conservation, Not sure I like the idea of a 2nd or 16th mountain capping leading to inevitable toxins release... But I believe that people can do the right thing too.

I just don't hold my breathe waiting on it.

Might well be your first "office" is a Sprinter... Or talk to the builders here. I imagine it would be really awesome if you could make a trailer fit a bike... and that wherevver you are doing this has NO hills.. not even little ones.


Ok, I have burned my typing budget for a while. and I smell ham...
Thanks
Much wisdom in your words.I get your points.
 
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