Votol EM-100 & EM-150 controllers

Tell me please!
There is a display photo below, it needs to be connected to the votol em150 72490 controller.
Power supplied 12v, no indication,
There is no image on the device!
I didn’t dare supply power from a 60v battery directly to the display!!!
Tell me, what kind of power is supplied to the display?!
 

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As for power supply, the issue is closed, power is supplied from the battery!
I’m still experimenting with how this display works together with the controller.
Any information will be useful!🤔
 
View attachment IMG_1706.webp
ok so I have a Qs 138 with a Votol em 200.
it works great in an adapted golf buggy, I am struggling to get the forward/reverse to function correctly. I have pin 1 and 6 for the reverse, works fine, 12 volt supply to 4 and 5 which lights up the display. When I try to go forward I have to flick the knob reverse forward to get it to change And I have no neutral.
does anyone have any idea how to get it to function correctly
TIA
 
It say android refuse agree share your BT for APP. I'll update a App version to ask BT dialog.View attachment 332380

Hello Fishblood,

I just went through this thread and saw your android app. I'll try it tomorrow with my EM30S, I have not tried using bluetooth with it before but I have an HC05 laying around.

I was wondering what environment you were building in till I saw your attachment of an MIT App Inventor snippet. I know a bit of flutter development and would love to build an app like yours on the flutter sdk so it works for both iOS and Android. I already saw your excel sheet on the VOTOL protocol but it'll be great help if you can share your MITAI2 project file.

Right now, I'm looking to control the controller with an Arduino board which should be straightforward once I get around understanding the protocol. Any guidance is appreciated!
 
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Hello, does anyone know what motor temp sensors can be used with Votol controllers?
Will the regular NTC 10K work?
Fardriver controllers allow you to select the sensor type, I don't see this in the votol software.
Thank you!
 
Hey guys,

I am trying to get my speedometer readings calibrated. I have the votol EM-150 controller with a QS motor and controller kit. I have two different pairs of wires labled CAN. one says its for the controller and one says speedometer. (see attached photos).

I am assuming i connect a magnetic sensor to my CAN line labled ‘speedometer’. Can some one please tell me what sensor I need and what needs to be set in the controller to get this working?

Thank you!
 

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CAN usually means CANbus, which is a specific serial communications protocol. It's unlikely that either set of wires with that label would support a speedo sensor, but if you find such a sensor that sends it's data via CANbus and you can program/setup the controller to read it, then it might work, if the data it sends is compatible with what that controller expects.

It's possible the diagram is mistaken and the speedometer connector is not CANbus, but just the usual digital input, or that it is *capable* of CANbus but is also used for just a digital input.

Most of these controllers use the hall sensors in the motor to read wheelspeed, for hubmotors. For nonhubmotors they may have a separate speedometer / wheelspeed sensor input, which would just be a regular digital input that simply counts pulses.

If the speed sensor is just a simple magnetic reed switch, like most are, with just two wires, it shouldn't hurt to try it on this connector...but if the wires really are CANbus and they trancievers they used don't have any short circuit protection, the repeated shorting of the wires that the sensor will do could damage them. If it works as a speedo sensor, then that's not a worry...but if it doesn't, you should disconnect the sensor until you find out why.



The two pictures you show only show the connectors and labelling, but not what they go to or any other context. Does the manual, or even the setup program, say anything about these connectors? Or about the speedo sensor choices themselves?
 
CAN usually means CANbus, which is a specific serial communications protocol. It's unlikely that either set of wires with that label would support a speedo sensor, but if you find such a sensor that sends it's data via CANbus and you can program/setup the controller to read it, then it might work, if the data it sends is compatible with what that controller expects.

It's possible the diagram is mistaken and the speedometer connector is not CANbus, but just the usual digital input, or that it is *capable* of CANbus but is also used for just a digital input.

Most of these controllers use the hall sensors in the motor to read wheelspeed, for hubmotors. For nonhubmotors they may have a separate speedometer / wheelspeed sensor input, which would just be a regular digital input that simply counts pulses.

If the speed sensor is just a simple magnetic reed switch, like most are, with just two wires, it shouldn't hurt to try it on this connector...but if the wires really are CANbus and they trancievers they used don't have any short circuit protection, the repeated shorting of the wires that the sensor will do could damage them. If it works as a speedo sensor, then that's not a worry...but if it doesn't, you should disconnect the sensor until you find out why.



The two pictures you show only show the connectors and labelling, but not what they go to or any other context. Does the manual, or even the setup program, say anything about these connectors? Or about the speedo sensor choices themselves?
Amberwolf,
The connectors pictured are from the Em-150 wiring diagram i received. After reading your comments and looking at the setup screen again though i think i need to use the ‘Lin’ sensor. As you can see in the attached photo of the setup software, the options are Hall speedometer or One-lin. In the wiring diagram i highlighted the single white wire labled ‘Lin signal’.

Currently, my display does show speed using the Hall speedometer setting its just off by more than double. If i switch to the One-lin setting in the software i assume it’s going to try and read that single white wire on the harness. do you have any idea what input that white wire should receive? As you said the magnetic sensors have two wires.

Thank you!
 

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Currently, my display does show speed using the Hall speedometer setting its just off by more than double.

is the number of pole pairs setup correctly? That is the number of pairs of magnets in your motor.


If i switch to the One-lin setting in the software i assume it’s going to try and read that single white wire on the harness. do you have any idea what input that white wire should receive?
No; if that's an input and not an output, then presumably it must receive the data in the "one line" format. There is a thread for Votol one-line protocol info around here somewhere.
 
CAN usually means CANbus, which is a specific serial communications protocol. It's unlikely that either set of wires with that label would support a speedo sensor, but if you find such a sensor that sends it's data via CANbus and you can program/setup the controller to read it, then it might work, if the data it sends is compatible with what that controller expects.

It's possible the diagram is mistaken and the speedometer connector is not CANbus, but just the usual digital input, or that it is *capable* of CANbus but is also used for just a digital input.

Most of these controllers use the hall sensors in the motor to read wheelspeed, for hubmotors. For nonhubmotors they may have a separate speedometer / wheelspeed sensor input, which would just be a regular digital input that simply counts pulses.

If the speed sensor is just a simple magnetic reed switch, like most are, with just two wires, it shouldn't hurt to try it on this connector...but if the wires really are CANbus and they trancievers they used don't have any short circuit protection, the repeated shorting of the wires that the sensor will do could damage them. If it works as a speedo sensor, then that's not a worry...but if it doesn't, you should disconnect the sensor until you find out why.



The two pictures you show only show the connectors and labelling, but not what they go to or any other context. Does the manual, or even the setup program, say anything about these connectors? Or about the speedo sensor choices themselves?
Amberwolf,
The connectors pictured are from the Em-150 wiring diagram i received. Looking at the setup screen though i think i need to use the ‘Lin’ sensor. As you can see in the attached photo of the setup software, the options are Hal speedometer or One-lin. In the wiring diagram i highlighted the single white wire labled ‘Lin signal’.

Currently, my display does show speed using the Hal
is the number of pole pairs setup correctly? That is the number of pairs of magnets in your motor.
This is the QS-138 motor and in the Votol configuration it has 5 pole pairs. Do you know how many it is supposed to have? Does hall angle affect the displayed speed?
 

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This is the QS-138 motor and in the Votol configuration it has 5 pole pairs. Do you know how many it is supposed to have?
How many magnet pairs does it have? that's the number you put in there.
 
Hello!
Can we connect a pot (potentiometer) to the Votol Controller 150 (PD15, maybe...) to change the EBS ratio or regenerative current?
Sorry fỏ by bad English!
 
No, you have to adjust the regen power level via the GUI.

Your English was perfect up until your apology ;)
 
Can we connect a pot (potentiometer) to the Votol Controller 150 (PD15, maybe...) to change the EBS ratio or regenerative current?
If you want variable regen, so that the brake lever varies the amount of braking just like your mechanical brakes do, then you may need a different controller. Most FOC controllers should have this ability; the Phaserunner by Grin Tech or other ASI-based controllers could do it, VESC of probably any flavor could do it (check the implementation before buying), etc. The Lebowski brain can do it; but you have to "build" your controller so only if you're very DIY).

Some of them implement this as a separate variable-voltage input from the throttle, some of them use the brake light switch (or ebrake switch) to engage braking mode, that then turns the throttle into a braking force control.
 
Hi,

I recently bought an EM-70, which is basically an em-100 I guess... After I made all the connections, the controller didn't work. It can't be connected by pc. I tried several pc's with windows 10, 11, 8 and a few usb-serial connectors including the one that comes with the controller. I changed the language of windows to Chinese, opened chinese language support. Nothing changed.

The producer tried to connect to the controller through remote acess... They also could not make it work.

Sending the unit back will cost me around 70$, so I want to repair it. I am good in electronics. I opened the case by force. My version is sealed by silicone glue, so it was hard to open. When opening I guess I also broke a resistor. It is very easy for me to solder another one, if I knew what would be the value.

I made my tests. I am suspecting the STM32 chip. Nothing else seems to be the problem, but STM32 chip heats up fast to somewhere I would call limits of a chip. Besides that, no problem what so ever.

Anyway, I am planning to solder a new STM32 chip; but I don't have the firmware. And can I upload the firmware through the controller or should I use another platform first?

I am also uploading the photos of the controller. I am not sure but I guess I broke one resistor. If anyone knows it's value, can you tell me? I marked it with a red circle in one of the photos.
 

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If the chip is heating up, it was probably damaged by something else--it almost certainly wouldn't have just failed this way. The most common way is a wiring fault, either a misconnection or a short between signal level and battery level votlages in things like the motor cable or display cable where both types are present (or a throttle with a battery meter or "ignition" switch on it). This short can be very intermittent and still cause this damage, yet be undetectable when it is not actively happening (like if a cable only has the internal short when it is in a very specific position, etc. :( It can also happen to someone else, who then sends the controller back to the seller as defective, who then just resells it not even testing it or caring--then the second purchaser can't even know why it's blown up, just that it is. :/

It could also be that the LVPS in the controller that makes the 5v, 12v, etc out of battery voltage is damaged or defective, and it putting out a higher voltage than it is supposed to, damaging everything on that voltage bus whether inside or outside the controller.

It could also be that the programming cable should be 3.3v but is 5v (there are several voltage ranges used on different serial ports), if the MCU is 3.3v inputs with direct connnections to the TX/RX lines, and that could also damage the MCU.

Those are the most common reasons for a fried MCU, if that's what's wrong.
 
If the chip is heating up, it was probably damaged by something else--it almost certainly wouldn't have just failed this way. The most common way is a wiring fault, either a misconnection or a short between signal level and battery level votlages in things like the motor cable or display cable where both types are present (or a throttle with a battery meter or "ignition" switch on it). This short can be very intermittent and still cause this damage, yet be undetectable when it is not actively happening (like if a cable only has the internal short when it is in a very specific position, etc. :( It can also happen to someone else, who then sends the controller back to the seller as defective, who then just resells it not even testing it or caring--then the second purchaser can't even know why it's blown up, just that it is. :/

It could also be that the LVPS in the controller that makes the 5v, 12v, etc out of battery voltage is damaged or defective, and it putting out a higher voltage than it is supposed to, damaging everything on that voltage bus whether inside or outside the controller.

It could also be that the programming cable should be 3.3v but is 5v (there are several voltage ranges used on different serial ports), if the MCU is 3.3v inputs with direct connnections to the TX/RX lines, and that could also damage the MCU.

Those are the most common reasons for a fried MCU, if that's what's wrong.
Thank you for your response. Actually, I am suspecting the 78m06 linear voltage regulator also. Because, when it is not loaded, it gives around 8V. This is not a case I am used to from 78xx chips. They give exactly the same voltage that they show.

As I understand, there are three phase voltage ragulation in this board. First: 72V to 14.4V. Second: 14.4V to 6 V. Third 6V to 3.3V.

Even this 78m06 is a damaged chip, it is not a reason for the MCU to not to work, because MCU works with 3.3V and for that there is another voltage ragulator (1117) and that gives stable 3.3V. Maybe at some point an overvoltage surge happened (due to a wrong wiring) and 1117 could not regulate it, but stayed alive after the incident? I don't know.

I checked all the condansators, which is known for tendency to short when faulty. They are ok. I checked the automatic fuses (I don't know the term of them, but there are some diodes that acts like an automatic fuse when a wrong connection is made. They let the voltage in when a voltage threshold is passed; but it is also connected to a resistor, so it grounds the voltage), they are also ok. Resistors are also ok.

I beleive, for an instant, because of a wrong wiring, MCU was fried, but the rest is ok.

The thing I don't know is: when I solder a new MCU, will I be able to flash it with the original usb cable? And do anyone have a firmware for EM80 or EM100 without bus line?

Also, there is an area that I beleive I damaged. I beleive in that area there should be a resistor. Can anyone tell me what is the value of that resistor?

If I solder a new MCU, I can check whether the new one will also fry or not. :D
 
Thank you for your response. Actually, I am suspecting the 78m06 linear voltage regulator also. Because, when it is not loaded, it gives around 8V. This is not a case I am used to from 78xx chips. They give exactly the same voltage that they show.

Yeah, it should be perfectly regulated with or without a load.

I wonder why they used a 7806 and not a 7805, because 6v is too much for the things that must be powered by 5v, such as throttle hall, ebrake halls (if they're not using regular switches), etc. (motor halls are usually tolerant up to 20-30v)



As I understand, there are three phase voltage ragulation in this board. First: 72V to 14.4V. Second: 14.4V to 6 V. Third 6V to 3.3V.
14.4v? I don't know this series of controllers' design, but usually its either 15v (7815) or 12v (7812), or sometimes a switching regulator is used, or a different linear regulator like the 317, for a different gate-driver supply voltage.



Even this 78m06 is a damaged chip, it is not a reason for the MCU to not to work, because MCU works with 3.3V and for that there is another voltage ragulator (1117) and that gives stable 3.3V. Maybe at some point an overvoltage surge happened (due to a wrong wiring) and 1117 could not regulate it, but stayed alive after the incident? I don't know.
Possible. But if the MCU has any 5v signal inputs (even with resistive voltage dividers) with pullups, like the hall signals, etc., the pullups on those would be powered by the too-high voltage line, and be brought up above what the MCU inputs can probably take, and that could damage the MCU.

Same thing for if this controller was previously owned (which you have no way of knowing) and returned after being damaged by one of those wiring faults I mentioned (which could have caused the "5v" regulator damage as well).


I checked the automatic fuses (I don't know the term of them, but there are some diodes that acts like an automatic fuse when a wrong connection is made. They let the voltage in when a voltage threshold is passed; but it is also connected to a resistor, so it grounds the voltage), they are also ok.
THe diodes are probably zeners. They're usualy wired in reverse polarity from the signal they're protecting to ground, with a small current-limiting resistor in series with the source of the signal.


The thing I don't know is: when I solder a new MCU, will I be able to flash it with the original usb cable? And do anyone have a firmware for EM80 or EM100 without bus line?
That i don't know. My guess is that you will need to connect with the STLink instead of the usb-serial; I think that is what the TSDZ2 and other opensource projects have to do for the systems that don't have a bootloader already on the MCU.


Also, there is an area that I beleive I damaged. I beleive in that area there should be a resistor. Can anyone tell me what is the value of that resistor?

Best guess is it is the same value as the other one; it looks like it goes to the same set of four pads near the MCU that is probably for the STLink type of programming. So it's probably a pullup resistor (and the other probably is too). The caps next to them probably buffer the supply voltage to the MCU from the STLink (as that is normally used without powering the controller up, so only the MCU is powered).

If I solder a new MCU, I can check whether the new one will also fry or not. :D
I'd make sure that regulator is replaced first. Heck, it might even fix the system (though I doubt it).
 
Hello everyone, I have a Votol 150-2 SP and I've already been on quite a journey trying to get this thing to work. At first it was non-responsive and would not connect to the software via adapter. The controller seemed to be flashing out an error code via the LED.
I tried everything including the steps Siaecosys recommended I take, but ended up having to get them to remote access my computer just to get it to connect.

When I finally got into the software I discovered the fault that I suspected. The error was listed as "Hall fault" which after some confusion I determined to be nothing to do with the hall sensor, but in fact a throttle fault. The throttle I have connected works because I was using it on my previous controller without issue. I can also measure the correct values going directly into the controller with +5v and +0.8-4.6v on the signal cable. What I don't understand is what could be causing the fault.
Interestingly if I use the remote throttle in the software, the motor will spin up normally. But as soon as I switch it back to local throttle, it goes into fault. I guess it's possible that the throttle is incompatible, but I thought hall throttles were pretty standardised.

Siaecosys have not been particularly helpful beyond the software problem, and at this point I'm feeling like the controller is faulty and needs to be returned. Unfortunately they don't seem interested in me sending the thing back and only asked if I was using their brand of throttle (which I am not), and to check the wiring which I have tried transposing to no avail. Are there any recommendations at this point? I only have the minimal things plugged in currently (hall sensor, ignition/e-lock, throttle, battery, motor).
 
Are the throttle signal voltages at the controller's throttle input pin, as measured, within the limits the software has setup?

If the power-on voltage of the throttle exceeds the throttle-high limit, or the throttle-low limit, then when the unit turns on and reads that it will fault to prevent a possible runaway condition. Similarly, if the throttle was normal but goes too high while using it, it should fault the same way.

I don't recall if the software shows you the voltage it reads there, but if it does and it's not matching the actual voltage, and / or shows the voltage is out of it's limits, that could confirm the above.
 
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